Re: Staining wood to simulate 'mother nature'


Sep 27, 2008

 


----------------------------

#8126 Sep 27, 2008

Her is a little something that is a bit off the wall, but takes planning. Why not leave a certain amount of sized stripwood out in the weather for a month or two (or 3?) and let it weather naturally. Then you wouldn't have to try and duplicate what Mother nature can do on her own.



Any thoughts?

Tony Burgess

Tulsa, OK ----- Original Message -----

From: dlhuffman

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 12:00 PM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Staining wood to simulate aged piers and wharfs + structures





Ron,



It varies according to the wood and the amount of rain and sun and whether

it was ever painted. I have seen structures with both the reddish brown and

silver grey.



Darryl Huffman

Anchorage, Alaska

dlhuffman@...



Scratchbuilding is fun and easy. Learn how:



www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/contact.html



----- Original Message -----

From: "Ron Hildebrand" rrmdlr5@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 9:35 AM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Staining wood to simulate aged piers and

wharfs + structures



> Very interesting, Cliff.

>

> I usually associate silver gray with strong and extended sun

> bleaching alone of untreated wood, but perhaps it needs a lot of

> water, too. I've seen lots of darker silver gray on wood that edge

> gardens that were nowhere near salt water, so it might just require a

> regular washing down with any sort of water, as well as the sun

> bleaching, to turn things gray. I also recall having seen it on very

> some old railroad cars where the paint has worn away--but I only

> remember it being a darker silver gray, not that very light gray. But

> as to Colorado, like you, everything I've ever seen ends up a pretty

> dark reddish brown. (Maybe it's a chemical reaction to all that

> mercury left in the ground! :-))

>

> Isn't it interesting that for as long as this hobby has had a real

> interest in weathering, this very, very basic stuff isn't enshrined

> somewhere definitively as part of "Weathering Wood 101" by now?

>

> I smell a new DVD, Darryl: what environmental conditions make rust

> the colors you see, and what conditions affect the coloring of aged wood!

>

> Ron Hildebrand

>

> At 06:10 AM 9/27/2008, Cliff wrote:

>

>>Hi All: I too have been down the street seeking the elusive "silver

>>grey" weathered building finishbecause the experts say it is a must.

>> From limited trips to Colorado I have not seen a mine or mill or

>>leavings I would call Silver Grey. Photos posted in the NG Groups

>>usually show a dirty brown or old BARN red cast. The only place I

>>have seen "silver Grey" is on structures along the salt water

>>beaches that are subject to long term WIND blown SPRAY and Sunshine.

>>Where in Colorado should I look for the silver grey mines etc. next

>>time I'm there? I am really curious .Thanks for any help I

>>receive-----Cliff F

>

>

---------------

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>













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----------------------------

#8127 Sep 27, 2008

Tony,



Be sure to rotate the stripwood every couple of days to weather it equally

on all sides. Will possibly warp as Mother Nature would have it be too. Then

you could build 'naturally curved' roofs.



And,,,,,here where I live in Colorado I'm not about to put several dollars

worth of a variety of stripwood out where the 100 mph winds might carry it off

to Oklahoma or others parts out yonder.



I suppose one could place the stripwood in one of those rotissarie baskets

on the barby, switch it on and let rotate for a month or so. No added heat of

course. I realize this is not the 'green way' so important these days, but

you get what you want.



8))



Keevan





In a message dated 9/27/2008 11:36:20 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time,

adm.nelson@... writes:



Her is a little something that is a bit off the wall, but takes planning.

Why not leave a certain amount of sized stripwood out in the weather for a

month or two (or 3?) and let it weather naturally. Then you wouldn't have to try

and duplicate what Mother nature can do on her own.









**************Looking for simple solutions to your real-life financial

challenges? Check out WalletPop for the latest news and information, tips and

calculators. (www.walletpop.com/?NCID=emlcntuswall00000001)





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#8128 Sep 27, 2008

Good thought Keevan, a grill might not be a bad idea, or better, a small frame slightly smaller than the length of the stripwood. You can tape the very ends down to the frame, and rotate the frame every few days. In fact, I just might give that a try.

Tony Burgess

Tulsa, OK ----- Original Message -----

From: Kjb80401@...

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 1:11 PM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Staining wood to simulate 'mother nature'





Tony,



Be sure to rotate the stripwood every couple of days to weather it equally

on all sides. Will possibly warp as Mother Nature would have it be too. Then

you could build 'naturally curved' roofs.



And,,,,,here where I live in Colorado I'm not about to put several dollars

worth of a variety of stripwood out where the 100 mph winds might carry it off

to Oklahoma or others parts out yonder.



I suppose one could place the stripwood in one of those rotissarie baskets

on the barby, switch it on and let rotate for a month or so. No added heat of

course. I realize this is not the 'green way' so important these days, but

you get what you want.



8))



Keevan





In a message dated 9/27/2008 11:36:20 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time,

adm.nelson@... writes:



Her is a little something that is a bit off the wall, but takes planning.

Why not leave a certain amount of sized stripwood out in the weather for a

month or two (or 3?) and let it weather naturally. Then you wouldn't have to try

and duplicate what Mother nature can do on her own.



**************Looking for simple solutions to your real-life financial

challenges? Check out WalletPop for the latest news and information, tips and

calculators. (www.walletpop.com/?NCID=emlcntuswall00000001)



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]













---------------







No virus found in this incoming message.

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com

Version: 8.0.169 / Virus Database: 270.7.4/1695 - Release Date: 9/27/2008 1:11 PM





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#8131 Sep 27, 2008

That's great unless the weathering of years is different from the weathering of months and you want your model to look years old. I'm going to put some wood out this weekend and see how it goes.



=======================

My Model Railroad Site:

rbdhd.t35.com/

Dave







----- Original Message ----

From: Tony Burgess adm.nelson@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 1:35:39 PM

Subject: [weathering] Staining wood to simulate 'mother nature'





Her is a little something that is a bit off the wall, but takes planning. Why not leave a certain amount of sized stripwood out in the weather for a month or two (or 3?) and let it weather naturally. Then you wouldn't have to try and duplicate what Mother nature can do on her own.



Any thoughts?

Tony Burgess

Tulsa, OK ----- Original Message -----

From: dlhuffman

To: weathering@yahoogro ups.com

Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 12:00 PM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Staining wood to simulate aged piers and wharfs + structures



Ron,



It varies according to the wood and the amount of rain and sun and whether

it was ever painted. I have seen structures with both the reddish brown and

silver grey.



Darryl Huffman

Anchorage, Alaska

dlhuffman@alaska. com



Scratchbuilding is fun and easy. Learn how:



www.darrylhu ffman.50megs. com/contact. html



----- Original Message -----

From: "Ron Hildebrand" rrmdlr5@hilstudio. com>

To: weathering@yahoogro ups.com>

Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 9:35 AM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Staining wood to simulate aged piers and

wharfs + structures



> Very interesting, Cliff.

>

> I usually associate silver gray with strong and extended sun

> bleaching alone of untreated wood, but perhaps it needs a lot of

> water, too. I've seen lots of darker silver gray on wood that edge

> gardens that were nowhere near salt water, so it might just require a

> regular washing down with any sort of water, as well as the sun

> bleaching, to turn things gray. I also recall having seen it on very

> some old railroad cars where the paint has worn away--but I only

> remember it being a darker silver gray, not that very light gray. But

> as to Colorado, like you, everything I've ever seen ends up a pretty

> dark reddish brown. (Maybe it's a chemical reaction to all that

> mercury left in the ground! :-))

>

> Isn't it interesting that for as long as this hobby has had a real

> interest in weathering, this very, very basic stuff isn't enshrined

> somewhere definitively as part of "Weathering Wood 101" by now?

>

> I smell a new DVD, Darryl: what environmental conditions make rust

> the colors you see, and what conditions affect the coloring of aged wood!

>

> Ron Hildebrand

>

> At 06:10 AM 9/27/2008, Cliff wrote:

>

>>Hi All: I too have been down the street seeking the elusive "silver

>>grey" weathered building finishbecause the experts say it is a must.

>> From limited trips to Colorado I have not seen a mine or mill or

>>leavings I would call Silver Grey. Photos posted in the NG Groups

>>usually show a dirty brown or old BARN red cast. The only place I

>>have seen "silver Grey" is on structures along the salt water

>>beaches that are subject to long term WIND blown SPRAY and Sunshine.

>>Where in Colorado should I look for the silver grey mines etc. next

>>time I'm there? I am really curious .Thanks for any help I

>>receive--- --Cliff F

>

>

> ------------ --------- --------- ------

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>



------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -



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Checked by AVG - www.avg com

Version: 8.0.169 / Virus Database: 270.7.4/1695 - Release Date: 9/27/2008 1:11 PM



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]













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----------------------------

#8135 Sep 28, 2008

I found out accidentally that oven cleaner ages wood extensively. I

was building a shuttle launch complex and forgot I had used

toothpicks on one of the assemblies i was taking paint off of. It

looked exactly like some old wood you might find on an antique out

house or something.

Bob Foley --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, Dave D dcwebguy@...> wrote:

>

> That's great unless the weathering of years is different from the

weathering of months and you want your model to look years old. I'm

going to put some wood out this weekend and see how it goes.

>

---------------

> My Model Railroad Site:

> rbdhd.t35.com/

> Dave

>

>

>

> ----- Original Message ----

> From: Tony Burgess adm.nelson@...>

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 1:35:39 PM

> Subject: [weathering] Staining wood to simulate 'mother nature'

>

>

> Her is a little something that is a bit off the wall, but takes

planning. Why not leave a certain amount of sized stripwood out in

the weather for a month or two (or 3?) and let it weather naturally.

Then you wouldn't have to try and duplicate what Mother nature can do

on her own.

>

> Any thoughts?

> Tony Burgess

> Tulsa, OK

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: dlhuffman

> To: weathering@yahoogro ups.com

> Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 12:00 PM

> Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Staining wood to simulate aged piers

and wharfs + structures

>

> Ron,

>

> It varies according to the wood and the amount of rain and sun and

whether

> it was ever painted. I have seen structures with both the reddish

brown and

> silver grey.

>

> Darryl Huffman

> Anchorage, Alaska

> dlhuffman@alaska. com

>

> Scratchbuilding is fun and easy. Learn how:

>

> www.darrylhu ffman.50megs. com/contact. html

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Ron Hildebrand" rrmdlr5@hilstudio. com>

> To: weathering@yahoogro ups.com>

> Sent: Saturday, September 27, 2008 9:35 AM

> Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Staining wood to simulate aged piers

and

> wharfs + structures

>

> > Very interesting, Cliff.

> >

> > I usually associate silver gray with strong and extended sun

> > bleaching alone of untreated wood, but perhaps it needs a lot of

> > water, too. I've seen lots of darker silver gray on wood that edge

> > gardens that were nowhere near salt water, so it might just

require a

> > regular washing down with any sort of water, as well as the sun

> > bleaching, to turn things gray. I also recall having seen it on

very

> > some old railroad cars where the paint has worn away--but I only

> > remember it being a darker silver gray, not that very light gray.

But

> > as to Colorado, like you, everything I've ever seen ends up a

pretty

> > dark reddish brown. (Maybe it's a chemical reaction to all that

> > mercury left in the ground! :-))

> >

> > Isn't it interesting that for as long as this hobby has had a real

> > interest in weathering, this very, very basic stuff isn't

enshrined

> > somewhere definitively as part of "Weathering Wood 101" by now?

> >

> > I smell a new DVD, Darryl: what environmental conditions make rust

> > the colors you see, and what conditions affect the coloring of

aged wood!

> >

> > Ron Hildebrand

> >

> > At 06:10 AM 9/27/2008, Cliff wrote:

> >

> >>Hi All: I too have been down the street seeking the

elusive "silver

> >>grey" weathered building finishbecause the experts say it is a

must.

> >> From limited trips to Colorado I have not seen a mine or mill or

> >>leavings I would call Silver Grey. Photos posted in the NG Groups

> >>usually show a dirty brown or old BARN red cast. The only place I

> >>have seen "silver Grey" is on structures along the salt water

> >>beaches that are subject to long term WIND blown SPRAY and

Sunshine.

> >>Where in Colorado should I look for the silver grey mines etc.

next

> >>time I'm there? I am really curious .Thanks for any help I

> >>receive--- --Cliff F

> >

> >

> > ------------ --------- --------- ------

> >

> > Yahoo! Groups Links

> >

> >

> >

> >

>

> ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -

>

> No virus found in this incoming message.

> Checked by AVG - www.avg com

> Version: 8.0.169 / Virus Database: 270.7.4/1695 - Release Date:

9/27/2008 1:11 PM

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>







----------------------------

#8138 Sep 28, 2008

You may want to give the wood a helping hand, Dave. I seem to remember

a discussion about soaking in amonia (SIC) first and it may have been

redwood the fellow was using. I recall the very first weathing clinic I

attended bu Robert Smith of the Gazette & 3/8" fame on using vinegar

and steel wool to make real rust. My buddy Chris & I could wait to rush

home and place a gallon container of Robert's formula and we waited two

weeks as Robert had stated that it would take for the vinegar to turn

the steel wool into rust in the hot Florida sun-not a darn thing

happened so we waited two more weeks and two more weeks for about three

months. And still, not a speckle of rust and we were beginning to

become the brunt of jokes as to how long to takes something to happen.

I.E. Question: How long do you think that it'll take you to build that

structure? Answer: About two weeks. Question: How long do you think

it'll take you to paint that boxcar? Answer: About two weeks and so on.

The long store short was that the vinegar was preserving the steel wool

and that if we wanted it to rust, we had to give Mother nature a hand-

exactly a handful of rust from the trunk of an old Chevy Corvair into

the solution and we had rust, it about two weeks. This hobby can be

very entertaining. later, ben | www.DrBens.com --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, Dave D dcwebguy@...> wrote:

> That's great unless the weathering of years is different from the

weathering of months and you want your model to look years old. I'm

going to put some wood out this weekend and see how it goes.

>

---------------

> My Model Railroad Site:

> rbdhd.t35.com/

> Dave



----------------------------

#8139 Sep 28, 2008

Why have we digressed into making this so difficult and now scientific? Who

cares?"



K.I.S.S.!, Folks. Let's get 'real'.



Keevan





In a message dated 9/28/2008 4:09:04 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,

yahoo.groups.for@... writes:



You may want to give the wood a helping hand, Dave. I seem to remember

a discussion about soaking in amonia (SIC) first and it may have been

redwood the fellow was using. I recall the very first weathing clinic I

attended bu Robert Smith of the Gazette & 3/8" fame on using vinegar

and steel wool to make real rust. My buddy Chris & I could wait to rush

home and place a gallon container of Robert's formula and we waited two

weeks as Robert had stated that it would take for the vinegar to turn

the steel wool into rust in the hot Florida sun-not a darn thing

happened so we waited two more weeks and two more weeks for about three

months. And still, not a speckle of rust and we were beginning to

become the brunt of jokes as to how long to takes something to happen.









**************Looking for simple solutions to your real-life financial

challenges? Check out WalletPop for the latest news and information, tips and

calculators. (www.walletpop.com/?NCID=emlcntuswall00000001)





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#8140 Sep 28, 2008

Well, perhaps because real weathering actually *is* scientific.



It may not be your cup of tea, Keevan, but it may indeed be of

interest to someone else. We all have different criteria for reaching

our weathering goals. Some want to be very precise and desire

repeatable results that looks as real as one can possibly make

it. Others want it "down and dirty,

looks-close-enough-for-government-work" simple. I would hope there is

room for all of us here.



Ron Hildebrand



At 02:12 PM 9/28/2008, Keevan wrote:

>Why have we digressed into making this so difficult and now scientific? Who

>cares?"

>

>K.I.S.S.!, Folks. Let's get 'real'.



----------------------------

#8143 Sep 29, 2008

I recall the very first weathing clinic I

attended bu Robert Smith of the Gazette & 3/8" fame on using vinegar

and steel wool to make real rust.

> Dave





Dave and all

As a carpenter-furniture maker I have used the steel wool soaked in vinegar solution to blacken wood. When this solution is applied to wood it reacts with the tannin and instantly creates a black color such as one would see extending from nails on a pallet that has been exposed to rain. I use this technique when I wish to make a certain special effect (Ebonize) that other paints or pigments can not. The advantage is the grain does not load and fill. Diluting this solution, significantly, would give less black saturation. As I use it, the surface gets a metallic bluish sheen (much like the rainbow effect of an oil slick on the surface of water) that turns dead black when the final finish is applied.

The only rust that has ever come of this technique was when the steel was removed from the vinegar and exposed the the air. Then the rust was plentiful and aggressive.

JD Huth (Jerry)









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#8145 Sep 30, 2008

Geez, Keevan. Why so grumpy? It's OK to digress on occasion. It's not

like we're on the S Scale Yahoo Group list beating "scale couplers" to

death. Besides, some of these posts ARE thought provoking.



Besides, I already think Doctor Ben's weatherings are the K.I.S.S. King

of Weathering products ;^) Later, Ben | www.DrBens.com

888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888 --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, Kjb80401@... wrote:

>

> Why have we digressed into making this so difficult and now

scientific? Who

> cares?"

>

> K.I.S.S.!, Folks. Let's get 'real'.

>

> Keevan







----------------------------

#8146 Sep 30, 2008

Maybe those here that interested in having their wood look good and

realistic rather than something from a cartoon or toy, are

interested. After all this group is called "WEATHERING"...and

not "Slap Krylon On An RTR Model" ......if you don't want to learn

and grow, or it's just to tough for you to comprehend....maybe you

need to sit back, zip-it, and let those that do care and want to

improve their skills participate/converse/learn.



Marc



.--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, Kjb80401@... wrote: >

> Why have we digressed into making this so difficult and now

scientific? Who > cares?"

>

> K.I.S.S.!, Folks. Let's get 'real'.

>

> Keevan

>

>

> In a message dated 9/28/2008 4:09:04 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,

> yahoo.groups.for@... writes:

>

> You may want to give the wood a helping hand, Dave. I seem to

remember > a discussion about soaking in amonia (SIC) first and it may have

been > redwood the fellow was using. I recall the very first weathing

clinic I > attended bu Robert Smith of the Gazette & 3/8" fame on using

vinegar > and steel wool to make real rust. My buddy Chris & I could wait to

rush > home and place a gallon container of Robert's formula and we

waited two > weeks as Robert had stated that it would take for the vinegar to

turn > the steel wool into rust in the hot Florida sun-not a darn thing

> happened so we waited two more weeks and two more weeks for about

three > months. And still, not a speckle of rust and we were beginning to

> become the brunt of jokes as to how long to takes something to

happen. >

>

>

>

> **************Looking for simple solutions to your real-life

financial > challenges? Check out WalletPop for the latest news and

information, tips and > calculators. (www.walletpop.com/?

NCID=emlcntuswall00000001) >

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>



----------------------------

#8147 Oct 1, 2008

I see no need to rip into fellow members of this group..........



Why not stick with the topic of weathering and stay away from posting

personal snubs of your fellow modelers???



A very old maxim of group lists is that when the topic strays to

posting negative personal comments about the participants; then the

topic is fully exhausted and completely dead.



Best to ya'

Mike Bauers

Milwaukee Wi, USA



On Oct 1, 2008, at 1:55 AM, Marc Reusser wrote:



> Maybe those here that interested in having their wood look good and

> realistic rather than something from a cartoon or toy, are

> interested. After all this group is called "WEATHERING"...and

> not "Slap Krylon On An RTR Model" ......if you don't want to learn

> and grow, or it's just to tough for you to comprehend....maybe you

> need to sit back, zip-it, and let those that do care and want to

> improve their skills participate/converse/learn.

>

> Marc

>

> .--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, Kjb80401@... wrote:

>>

>> Why have we digressed into making this so difficult and now

> scientific? Who

>> cares?"

>>

>> K.I.S.S.!, Folks. Let's get 'real'.

>>

>> Keevan

>>

>>

>> In a message dated 9/28/2008 4:09:04 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,

>> yahoo.groups.for@... writes:

>>

>> You may want to give the wood a helping hand, Dave. I seem to

> remember

>> a discussion about soaking in amonia (SIC) first and it may have

> been

>> redwood the fellow was using. I recall the very first weathing

> clinic I ...............................



----------------------------

#8148 Oct 1, 2008

My apologies for this going to the group. In my haste I forgot to

change the Send To address and instead of going to just Keevan . . .

BTW The KOWP statemnet is a personal joke and is NOT meant in a

durogatory way. Sincerely, Richard Bendever

--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "rebendever" yahoo.groups.for@...>

wrote: >

> Geez, Keevan. Why so grumpy? It's OK to digress on occasion. It's not

> like we're on the S Scale Yahoo Group list beating "scale couplers"

to > death. Besides, some of these posts ARE thought provoking.

>

> Besides, I already think Doctor Ben's weatherings are the K.I.S.S.

King > of Weathering products ;^) Later, Ben | www.DrBens.com

> 888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888888



----------------------------

#8149 Oct 4, 2008

On a constructive note, last year I bought two plain wood racks for my

garden. I purposely left them untreated, and added some coffee

stirrers as well. Eighteen months later, albeit through two awful

English summers, the wood is only now starting to turn slightly grey!



----------------------------

#8150 Oct 4, 2008

Certainly, the kind of "weathering" most of us refer to in our modeling

efforts is the result of decades of unprotected exposure of various

materials to the elements. Another factor is that most modeling is, in

essence, a caricature of reality - we have to exaggerate some of the

features in order to tell the story. So, by extremely weathering a barn,

for instance, we are telling the viewer that "this is a very old barn

that was once a lovely and useful building that has been

neglected/abandoned by its owner for some time". I happen to feel that

is what makes our hobby an artistic effort, versus an architects

rendering of a proposed project. Of course, I am sure that others may

differ. :-)



Mike



Mike Siggins wrote: >

>

> On a constructive note, last year I bought two plain wood racks for my

> garden. I purposely left them untreated, and added some coffee

> stirrers as well. Eighteen months later, albeit through two awful

> English summers, the wood is only now starting to turn slightly grey!

>







----------------------------

#8157 Oct 6, 2008

Her is a little something that is a bit off the wall, but

> takes planning. Why not leave a certain amount of sized

> stripwood out in the weather for a month or two (or 3?) and

> let it weather naturally. Then you wouldn't have to try and

> duplicate what Mother nature can do on her own.



To accelerate the process, use some bleach.



Steve



----------------------------

#8160 Oct 6, 2008

Spraying painted wood with oven cleaner works well also.

Found out accidentally while stripping the paint off, the wood looked a

hundred years old when it dried.

Bob Foley Fla. --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen Pushak" teban@...> wrote:

>

> > Her is a little something that is a bit off the wall, but

> > takes planning. Why not leave a certain amount of sized

> > stripwood out in the weather for a month or two (or 3?) and

> > let it weather naturally. Then you wouldn't have to try and

> > duplicate what Mother nature can do on her own.

>

> To accelerate the process, use some bleach.

>

> Steve

>



----------------------------

#8169 Oct 7, 2008

Most oven cleaners are variations on lye. Be very careful with them.



Mike



foleyenterprises777 wrote: >

>

> Spraying painted wood with oven cleaner works well also.

> Found out accidentally while stripping the paint off, the wood looked a

> hundred years old when it dried.

> Bob Foley Fla.



----------------------------

#8170 Oct 7, 2008

I hope that anyone that uses anything, is smart enough to read the

labels before using a product...........



If not............



You'll wind up like my three co-workers did yesterday afternoon when

they blew themselves up....... But I exaggerate..... They were more

thrown about and one slightly crushed and broken.



They actually were standing under a 40 foot long by 10 foot long

heavy equipment platform they were attaching to a mining shovel under

construction.



They were not too far away from a simple sign we have scattered

about....... "We stand behind our cranes. not under them." Similar

and more detailed instructions are attached to the controls and

hooks of the overhead cranes.



Not quite as directly relevant as it could be to using a product to

weather a model. But it does show what can happen when you work

counter to the directions of any product you are using.



Of course, there was the painter that exploded while working in a

boom a couple of years ago, blew out the side of the building in the

process. The explosion acted just like a cannon going off as his

paint fumes ignited in the boom he was painting............. and was

also in, at the time. He was only a little broken in the process.



He overlooked one little must-do detail of how to paint that

part......... the grounding clip/cable.



As specifically outlined in his computer printed job instructions for

that operation.



You just gotta read the instructions before you start the job!!!!!!



Best to ya'

Mike Bauers

Milwaukee Wi, USA



On Oct 7, 2008, at 6:00 AM, Mike Sloane wrote:



> Most oven cleaners are variations on lye. Be very careful with them.

>

> Mike

>

> foleyenterprises777 wrote:

>>

>>

>> Spraying painted wood with oven cleaner works well also.

>> Found out accidentally while stripping the paint off, the wood

>> looked a

>> hundred years old when it dried.

>> Bob Foley Fla.



----------------------------

#8172 Oct 7, 2008

Found that out by accident also. [Smiley] --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sloane mikesloane@...> wrote:

>

> Most oven cleaners are variations on lye. Be very careful with them.

>

> Mike

>

> foleyenterprises777 wrote:

> >

> >

> > Spraying painted wood with oven cleaner works well also.

> > Found out accidentally while stripping the paint off, the wood

looked a

> > hundred years old when it dried.

> > Bob Foley Fla.

>



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