VintageBigBlue.org

 

Re: Roads of various flavors


Feb 10, 2005

 


----------------------------

#1524 Feb 10, 2005

Hi Group,



I would like to clear up the discussion on this CD.



First off the reason there is 8 of each is because they are all

different sizes. Look at them, the titles under the pic's have a

letter S (small) L (large) M (medium) VL ( very large) VVL (very

very large). That way when you print them out you can decide which

size will work for your scale.

If you look at them on the screen at 100% they are fuzzy.



Second if you print them they look great.

I'm very happy with my CD.



Thankx

Have a groovy day

Bob Black

Train Mania

www.trainmania.net



----------------------------

#1529 Feb 10, 2005

Bob writes -

First off the reason there is 8 of each is because they are all

different sizes. Look at them, the titles under the pic's have a

letter S (small) L (large) M (medium) VL ( very large) VVL (very

very large). That way when you print them out you can decide which

size will work for your scale.

Um, why is this necessary??? If one is going to print the sign to use on

their models, they usually would place the picture in a Word document (or

any other) and scale it to the size they want. At least, that's what I do. I

generate my own signs at 20-40 times bigger than needed, then just adjust

the jpeg (or giff or tiff, whatever) to what fits. I then place several on

an 8.5x11 sheet in Word and print that sheet.

I would guess from your description that you set the pictures to a very low

resolution. What advantage is 8 low-res copies over one hi-res? It would be

interesting to do a disk-usage comparison, but I'd bet the single-copy would

take far less disk space.

Besides, if you're advertising 6000 pictures, but in reality you're selling

8 copies of 750 pics, is that truth in advertising?

Just my opinion. I could be wrong.

BTW - if Bob isn't the producer of the CD, my apologies. Bob, don't take it

personally.

Bert



----------------------------

#1530 Feb 10, 2005

Bob wrote: > If you look at them on the screen at 100% they are fuzzy.> Second if you

> print them they look great.



Bob,

This is an interesting phenomenon concerning how things look on the computer

screen.



On my CDs of old logging equipment, the photo that opens may sometimes look

fuzzy. But when you zoom in on the photo, it becomes sharper.



Has to do with dpi of the photo. The screen can only show so much detail

(not much) but the printer can bring it out.



I don't own a copy of the CD with the signs, but I do know there are a lot

of people on this list who are doing good to just print out a photo withou

manipulating it with a photo editing program. So I can certainly see the

benefit of different sizes for the neophyte computer user.



Darryl Huffman

Anchorage, Alaska



Check out my web page at www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3.html

for photos of some of my modelbuilding projects.



----------------------------

#1538 Feb 10, 2005

All I can say is I like the CD, it has a lot of stuff on it that

would take a lot of time to find.



I'm not the producer of the CD, I own Train Mania, and I'm a

model railroader that's all.





Have a groovy day

Bob



--- Bert Greeley bert-tpsrr@...> wrote:

> Bob writes -

> First off the reason there is 8 of each is because they are

> all

> different sizes. Look at them, the titles under the pic's have

> a

> letter S (small) L (large) M (medium) VL ( very large) VVL

> (very

> very large). That way when you print them out you can decide

> which

> size will work for your scale.

> Um, why is this necessary??? If one is going to print the sign

> to use on

> their models, they usually would place the picture in a Word

> document (or

> any other) and scale it to the size they want. At least,

> that's what I do. I

> generate my own signs at 20-40 times bigger than needed, then

> just adjust

> the jpeg (or giff or tiff, whatever) to what fits. I then

> place several on

> an 8.5x11 sheet in Word and print that sheet.

> I would guess from your description that you set the pictures

> to a very low

> resolution. What advantage is 8 low-res copies over one

> hi-res? It would be

> interesting to do a disk-usage comparison, but I'd bet the

> single-copy would

> take far less disk space.

> Besides, if you're advertising 6000 pictures, but in reality

> you're selling

> 8 copies of 750 pics, is that truth in advertising?

> Just my opinion. I could be wrong.

> BTW - if Bob isn't the producer of the CD, my apologies. Bob,

> don't take it

> personally.

> Bert

>

>

>









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----------------------------

#1565 Feb 13, 2005

Darryl,



You wrote:

> I don't own a copy of the CD with the signs, but I do know there are a

lot > of people on this list who are doing good to just print out a photo

without > manipulating it with a photo editing program. So I can certainly see the

> benefit of different sizes for the neophyte computer user.



You make a good point, but the seller of the CD should note this, not just

advertise 6000 images, when it's actually 700+. His ad gives you the

impression that there are 6000 different images on the CD when there isn't.

Many of us are computer literate enough to resize the images as we need,

and I myself was very disappointed with the CD for this reason, among

others.



Larry



Larry Rickert

Brooklyn, NY, USA

lrickert@...

profiles.yahoo.com/lhrickert



"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do

nothing."

Edmund Burke



Over 1900 model railroaders can't be wrong! Check out:

pw2.netcom.com/~lrickert/On30/On30.html

and join the Conspiracy!







----------------------------

#1567 Feb 13, 2005

Larry,



I certainly understand your concerns.



700 images in 8 different sizes would be a better description.



Darryl Huffman

Anchorage, Alaska



Check out my web page at www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3.html

for photos of some of my modelbuilding projects. ----- Original Message -----

From: "Larry Rickert" lrickert@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Sunday, February 13, 2005 6:44 AM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Model Railroads Clip-Art CD





>

> Darryl,

>

> You wrote:

>

>> I don't own a copy of the CD with the signs, but I do know there are a

> lot

>> of people on this list who are doing good to just print out a photo

> without

>> manipulating it with a photo editing program. So I can certainly see the

>> benefit of different sizes for the neophyte computer user.

>

> You make a good point, but the seller of the CD should note this, not just

> advertise 6000 images, when it's actually 700+. His ad gives you the

> impression that there are 6000 different images on the CD when there

> isn't.

> Many of us are computer literate enough to resize the images as we need,

> and I myself was very disappointed with the CD for this reason, among

> others.

>

> Larry

>

> Larry Rickert

> Brooklyn, NY, USA

> lrickert@...

> profiles.yahoo.com/lhrickert

>

> "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do

> nothing."

> Edmund Burke



----------------------------

#1568 Feb 13, 2005

Darryl wrote - , > I don't own a copy of the CD with the signs, but I do know there are a lot

> of people on this list who are doing good to just print out a photo

without > manipulating it with a photo editing program. So I can certainly see the

> benefit of different sizes for the neophyte computer user.



I didn't see Darryl saying that. And the truth of the matter is, if anyone

has the ability to send/receive emails, can type a document or view

pictures, they would be able to use the method I described. There is no need

for a photo-editing program - just copy the photo to the clipboard, paste it

in a word (or whatever word processor you're using) document, and use the

corner handles to size it to what you want. The corner handles are those

little squares on the edge of the picture when you first paste it in. I

usually have to re-size several times before I get the exact size I want.

Back when I was teaching, one of the things I found interesting was the

surprise my students showed when they realized just how easy many of the

processes were. Since with M$ products there are about 6 different ways to

perform each act, I would teach as many as I knew (no, I didn't know

_everything_, but I know enough to help about anyone improve their skills)

and let the student decide which one was right for themselves.

For that matter, I had major job problems in Corporate America's computer

arm. I was often getting in trouble for actually taking the time to explain

what was happening in the program/computer to users when they asked. I guess

I was eroding the mystery the IS managers wanted to maintain. Knowledge is

power, and they wanted to retain that power for themselves. Unfortunately, I

believe that's wrong.

If anyone out there would like some help learning this of other steps, I

would be glad to help off-list.

Bert



----------------------------

#1571 Feb 13, 2005

No, Bert, I must respectfully disagree. What you did was exactly right in

the grand scheme of things.

Bravo to you , and keep up the good work.

I use Photoshop for resizing, and many printers include a basic version,

like Elements, as part of the software bundle. So many folks on this list

probably already have some sort of graphics-specific program on their hard

drives. If Word or similar is all a person has, plenty good enough.

But you are sure correct. It ain't rocket science or I couldn't do it.

Cheers :)

Roy Inman



on 2/13/05 11:25 AM, Bert Greeley at bert-tpsrr@... wrote:

> I was eroding the mystery the IS managers wanted to maintain. Knowledge is

> power, and they wanted to retain that power for themselves. Unfortunately, I

> believe that's wrong.

> If anyone out there would like some help learning this of other steps, I

> would be glad to help off-list.



----------------------------

#4226 Mar 1, 2006

I have a "what I did" about making old roads at:



www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/scenery/clods/



www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/photos/clods.jpg



Thank you if you visit

Harold



----------------------------

#4227 Mar 1, 2006

Harold, what a great technique. Thank you for shareing.

Tony



Harold Minkwitz hminky@...> wrote:

I have a "what I did" about making old roads at:



www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/scenery/clods/



www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/photos/clods.jpg



Thank you if you visit

Harold











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----------------------------

#4228 Mar 2, 2006

Harold,



Very nice technique and results!



May I ask a question?



What kind of latex paint (color, company, etc.) do you use with the grout?



Regards,

Lawrence

On 3/1/06, Harold Minkwitz hminky@...> wrote:

>

> I have a "what I did" about making old roads at:

>

> www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/scenery/clods/

>

> www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/photos/clods.jpg

>

> Thank you if you visit

> Harold

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#4229 Mar 2, 2006

What kind of latex paint (color, company, etc.) do you use with the

grout? >



I think it is Harvest Gold from Walmart, the cheapest latex. I just

matched it to the red paver sand I use for ground cover. When I change

paver sands later in construction I will use the basic latex paint that

matches that paver sand



www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/gravel/



Harold



----------------------------

#4230 Mar 2, 2006

Harold the more I visit your website the more I.m impress, just return from

visit the clods pictures, I have to remove the mud from my boots. Very good

info, and all that for free with nothing to sell.







Gerard























_____



De : weathering@yahoogroups.com [mailto:weathering@yahoogroups.com] De la

part de Lawrence Rast

Envoy. : 2 mars, 2006 07:56

. : weathering@yahoogroups.com

Objet : Re: [weathering] Making clay clods and old dirt roads







Harold,



Very nice technique and results!



May I ask a question?



What kind of latex paint (color, company, etc.) do you use with the grout?



Regards,

Lawrence

On 3/1/06, Harold Minkwitz hminky@...> wrote:

>

> I have a "what I did" about making old roads at:

>

> www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/scenery/clods/

>

> www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/photos/clods.jpg

>

> Thank you if you visit

> Harold

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









_____



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*. Visit your group "weathering

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----------------------------

#4231 Mar 2, 2006

Hi Harold,



Yet another fine piece of work. I have visited your web sight a

lot (it's in my favorites), and I always come away with another

great idea. You web sight is an inspiration to this great hobby.



Keep up the great work, the photos are awesome, and the

explanations are top notch.



Thankx for sharing

Bob Black

> On 3/1/06, Harold Minkwitz hminky@...>

> wrote:

> >

> > I have a "what I did" about making old roads at:

> >

> > www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/scenery/clods/

> >

> > www.pacificcoastairlinerr.com/photos/clods.jpg

> >

> > Thank you if you visit

> > Harold





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----------------------------

#11815 Mar 3, 2012

At some point on another board I described how the use of an inexpensive material easily found at Michael's or Joanne Fabrics called Creatology Fun Foam can make a decent road surface and is quite easy to work with. Rather than fully describe the product and process here, tonight I documented weathering this stuff with chalk on my site with pics.



Question - years ago I purchased weathering chalks in little square plastic containers- they were about 1" square themselves. There are pics on the post at my own site ( rail.habersack.com/?p=81 ). I would like to try to purchase more of this weathering chalk, and if anyone can identify where they came from or where to get them, can you let me know? They are pretty old and I had written off the ability to find more, but low and behold there was an article in MRH recently and a photo of the same product - so I though I'd ask here.



Thanks in advance.



----------------------------

#11816 Mar 3, 2012

That would be Bragdon's Weathering Powders, I have a set andthey workwell.��www.bragdonent.com/��Where is your site for us to see the pictures you made mention of?��Keevan��In a message dated 3/3/2012 8:41:46 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,joppaironworks@... writes:Question- years ago I purchased weathering chalks in little square plastic containers-they were about 1" square themselves. There are pics on the post at my ownsite ( rail.habersack.com/?p=81 ). I would like to try to purchase moreof this weathering chalk, and if anyone can identify where they came from orwhere to get them, can you let me know? They are pretty old and I had writtenoff the ability to find more, but low and behold there was an article in MRHrecently and a photo of the same product - so I though I'd askhere.







----------------------------

#11817 Mar 3, 2012

Hi Mike,



I have not seen chalks in those containers in the last few years. But I use Bragdon's and they work quite well.





Regards

Rod Hutchinson

---------------

Mooroolbark, Victoria, Australia





Question - years ago I purchased weathering chalks in little square plastic containers- they were about 1" square themselves. There are pics on the post at my own site ( rail.habersack.com/?p=81 ). I would like to try to purchase more of this weathering chalk, and if anyone can identify where they came from or where to get them, can you let me know? They are pretty old and I had written off the ability to find more, but low and behold there was an article in MRH recently and a photo of the same product - so I though I'd ask here.



----------------------------

#11861 Apr 18, 2012

I've recently become aware of the memory of the roads I knew in my youth.



I've become more and more disappointed in my model roads. No matter what I did the roads always looked like I painted the surface.



Oh I would be artistic in the process with weathering and color blending, even layering of the assorted tones I saw in/on roadway surfaces.



Lately, I've begun to take pictures of road surfaces because I just can not model the surfaces in any other realistic way.



I'll attach a basic image of worn roadway and you see if the actual thing is so much more complex that one can't really model it with the traditional craft approach based on methods of paint.



I'm working to make photo-real roadways as a result.



Mike Bauers



----------------------------

#11870 Apr 19, 2012

Looks very good, and you need to send along more pics as it progresses. I have also started to like the appearance of photos. In last month's MRH and this month's MR photos are used in modeling with excellent results that you just cannot get with traditional products. I'm wondering if adding any relief under the photo road would complete the illusion - such as rubbing the substrate over sand or something to add a texture before gluing it down?

m

��Mike Habersack

Home Web:rail.habersack.comModerator:groups.yahoo.com/group/HO_Scale_Structures/

Maryland - the land of pleasant living... From: Mike Bauers mwbauers55@...> To: Weathering@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2012 7:21 AM Subject: [weathering] Roads [1 Attachment]

��I've recently become aware of the memory of the roads I knew in my youth.



I've become more and more disappointed in my model roads. No matter what I did the roads always looked like I painted the surface.



Oh I would be artistic in the process with weathering and color blending, even layering of the assorted tones I saw in/on roadway surfaces.



Lately, I've begun to take pictures of road surfaces because I just can not model the surfaces in any other realistic way.



I'll attach a basic image of worn roadway and you see if the actual thing is so much more complex that one can't really model it with the traditional craft approach based on methods of paint.



I'm working to make photo-real roadways as a result.



Mike Bauers



----------------------------

#11872 Apr 19, 2012

My working materials are non-perspective, top down images that I flood fill to create printable streets. Add in sampled and photo-pasted man-holes sewer grates and assorted tar seams, road patches, and 'painted' street lines.



I hope to have success with graphic program 'airbrushed' traffic oil and dirt streaks. I have to do more experimentation with transparency and tone effects on those.



One odd thing about roads is that as they weather and age, asphalt roads begin to look like concrete surfaces and concrete surfaces begin to look like asphalt. Respective materials fading and dirtying does this over time. It makes for modeling judgement mistakes from just looking at older pictures of a road or street.



This sort of thing is actually a lot of fun during the process.



On Apr 19, 2012, at 12:06 PM, Mike Habersack wrote:



>

>

> Looks very good, and you need to send along more pics as it progresses. I have also started to like the appearance of photos. In last month's MRH and this month's MR photos are used in modeling with excellent results that you just cannot get with traditional products. I'm wondering if adding any relief under the photo road would complete the illusion - such as rubbing the substrate over sand or something to add a texture before gluing it down?



I suspect and need to experiment a bit, that the photo-real texture of a scale image using a photo-matte paper or semi-gloss paper will give that wanted texture look with out having to apply any sort of loose materials.



Loose gravel should model well with loose scenic materials. While the hard road surface scales at a tenth of a thousandth surface variation. Which is likely about the same surface texture of a photo-paper with a matte surface.



That's what real world experience tells me as a best guess without lab testing it..



Mike Bauers



----------------------------

#11873 Apr 19, 2012

Out of curiosity - what would you folks recommend for implementing old brick roads?

On Apr 19, 2012, at 5:08 PM, Mike Bauers wrote:

My working materials are non-perspective, top down images that I flood fill to create printable streets. Add in sampled and photo-pasted man-holes sewer grates and assorted tar seams, road patches, and 'painted' street lines.

I hope to have success with graphic program 'airbrushed' traffic oil and dirt streaks. I have to do more experimentation with transparency and tone effects on those.

One odd thing about roads is that as they weather and age, asphalt roads begin to look like concrete surfaces and concrete surfaces begin to look like asphalt. Respective materials fading and dirtying does this over time. It makes for modeling judgement mistakes from just looking at older pictures of a road or street.

This sort of thing is actually a lot of fun during the process.



Jerry JankuraAbstract art is a product of the untalented,��sold by the unprincipled to the utterly��bewildered - Al Capp







----------------------------

#11874 Apr 19, 2012

Laser etched wood is coming on and looks great. Monster Model Works

has some and if you can get Jimmy a good picture he can duplicate it for you.



monstermodelworks.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=15>



At 18:29 4/19/2012, you wrote:



>Out of curiosity - what would you folks recommend for implementing

>old brick roads?



-

Bruce Wilson

Barrie, Ontario

Life Member NMRA Member Gauge 0 Guild

Member Scale 7 Group Member 7mm NGA

Member Bird Studies Canada Member Ontario Bird Banding Association



----------------------------

#11875 Apr 24, 2012

Here's an idea............



Brick colored card stock that gets laser cut into walls and streets of scale bricks. I'm not sure if the mortar lines will always become dark by the laser. But you can random color the blank brick sheet in appropriate colors and then cut the complete wall.



Need I mention that this also gives you complete building walls minus the installable doors and windows?



If the huge range of craft cutter card stock is tried, you'll have solidly colored card stock that could yield different color mortar and non-mortared coloring in the laser cut lines.......... streets and walls.......



Got a color laser printer to make the master sheets with?



Mike Bauers

On Apr 19, 2012, at 5:41 PM, Bruce Wilson wrote:



> Laser etched wood is coming on and looks great. Monster Model Works

> has some and if you can get Jimmy a good picture he can duplicate it for you.

>

> monstermodelworks.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=15>

>

> At 18:29 4/19/2012, you wrote:

>

>

>> Out of curiosity - what would you folks recommend for implementing

>> old brick roads?



----------------------------

#11910 May 16, 2012

In case anyone is wondering at all the posts .. I'm in the middle of moving articles/threads from my forum that no one visits .. to my website. Thought I would share ..



I have a small section title .. umm .. 'Roads' (go figure)

etraxx.com/projects/scenery/roads/

--------

Ancient Asphalt - on the Westlake forum had someone ask how to model "decaying asphalt" .. his diorama being a "... post-apocalyptic Mad Max sort of setting .." .. as he put it. I came up with this .. kinda over the top but I think it would work great for general rocky ground.



etraxx.com/lcnrr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Image22.jpg



etraxx.com/projects/scenery/roads/ancient-asphalt/

--------

Ancient Asphalt Redux - a variation on the first try. This one I think would work pretty well.



etraxx.com/lcnrr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Flexible.jpg



etraxx.com/projects/scenery/roads/ancient-asphalt-redux/

--------

Pump House Road - a variation on the last one



etraxx.com/lcnrr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Image15.jpg



etraxx.com/projects/scenery/roads/pump-house-road/



----------------------------

#11911 May 16, 2012

Hi Ed ��Personal observations: ��I thought this one looked like volcanic lava that had hardened etraxx.com/lcnrr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Image22.jpgWhile the other looked a little too evenly sized chunks.I just checked my driveway, which needs resurfacing and the buts of asphalt which are only an inch or so in thickness ��vary quite a lot from bigger bits to very small pieces across a given area.I think your one with some extra work would be better for cracked and broken concrete. ��My 2 cents worthRussell �� �� ��From: weathering@yahoogroups.com [mailto:weathering@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Edward TraxlerSent: Thursday, 17 May 2012 12:46 p.m.To: weathering@yahoogroups.comSubject: [weathering] Roads of various flavors



----------------------------

#11912 May 17, 2012

--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, Russell J Postlewaight russell.unfire@...> wrote: >

> Hi Ed

>

> Personal observations:

>

> I thought this one looked like volcanic lava that had hardened

> etraxx.com/lcnrr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Image22.jpg>

> etraxx.com/lcnrr/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Image22.jpg

> While the other looked a little too evenly sized chunks.

> I just checked my driveway, which needs resurfacing and the buts of asphalt

> which are only an inch or so in thickness vary quite a lot from bigger bits

> to very small pieces across a given area.

> I think your one with some extra work would be better for cracked and broken

> concrete.

>

> My 2 cents worth

> Russell



I agree. The original reason for the .. surface .. was as I said to see if I could replicate a sorta-kinda 'Mad Max' post-pocalyptic thing.



I think though the technique would work for a rocky surface as you said, it looks like vocanic rock. I was thinking that brushing some fine sand/powder of the surface in all the low places and a scenic cement would make for a great (interesting) surface.



Hopefully .. I get feedback. The blog is Wordpress which means there is a comment box at the bottom. My plan was for posts like that to generate responses .. suggestions with others taking the idea and running with it.



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