Re: [weathering] Paint on wood vs metal


Mar 4, 2014

 


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#12304 Mar 4, 2014

I saw a great method for modeling fading paint on a freight car using an oil-based "slather" of white or lighter paint color, then selectively removing most of the paint using thinner soaked brushes of various shapes to get an uneven effect. The example though, was a relatively modern metal sided covered hopper.

My question to this group is: does freight car paint on wood sided cars fade too? Or does it just flake off or wear thin, making it look like it might be faded? ��Most wood car photos I've seen are in b/w and those in color tend to be of cars 30-50 years after it was built. I suppose paint on a wooden building might give an answer, but modern paint is VERY different from paint in the 1900-1930 era. �� So how did early 20th century wood freight car sides and ends "weather" over 5-10 years of use? ��Can I use contemporary freight car weatherers, sans graffiti, techniques to weather wood cars? If not, what should I do?

I want a nice mix of weathering, with most of it fairly light, and very few decrepit cars, unless they are on my Buildings & Bridges train (i.e., MoW for 1935-1940 era steam railway).

Dave Bott



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#12305 Mar 4, 2014

Years ago, like in the 1800's, cars were often painted Oxblood Red.��The paint got its name from the painters using real Oxblood when mixing thepaint to give its characteristic red��color.�� Being an organicsubstance, it did indeed fade.�� I have a picture of a 11-car train and notwo of them look alike due to their fading.��Keevan��In a message dated 3/4/2014 9:07:15 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,dbott@... writes:My question to this group is: does freight car paint on wood sided carsfade too? Or does it just flake off or wear thin, making it look like it mightbe faded? ��Most wood car photos I've seen are in b/w and those in colortend to be of cars 30-50 years after it was built. I suppose paint on a woodenbuilding might give an answer, but modern paint is VERY different from paintin the 1900-1930 era. �� So how did early 20th century wood freight carsides and ends "weather" over 5-10 years of use? ��Can I use contemporaryfreight car weatherers, sans graffiti, techniques to weather wood cars? Ifnot, what should I d o?

I want a nice mix of weathering, with most of it fairly light, and veryfew decrepit cars, unless they are on my Buildings & Bridges train (i.e.,MoW for 1935-1940 era steam railway).

Dave Bott



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#12306 Mar 4, 2014

Years ago, like in the 1800's, cars were often painted Oxblood Red. The

paint got its name from the painters using real Oxblood when mixing the

paint to give its characteristic red color. Being an organic substance, it

did indeed fade. I have a picture of a 11-car train and no two of them look

alike due to their fading.



Keevan





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You just have to go back 10 to 15 years to the boxcar era to see that.



You could photograph a yard and there'd be dozens of shades of boxcar red,

all with the same road name.



Which is why I never bother to use "boxcar red". I spray all my boxcars

that I'm decaling myself with automotive primer. Any brand, even if they

don't match because neither did the prototype after a year or two in the

weather.







Roger Traviss



Home of the late Great Eastern Railway

greateasternrailway.com



More photos of the late GER at: -

s94.photobucket.com/albums/l99/rogertra/Great_Eastern/



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#12307 Mar 5, 2014

Roger,

Have you built another layout since the Great Eastern?

Christopher



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#12308 Mar 5, 2014

Yes, a new GER is under construction. �� ��

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 5, 2014, at 17:14, myrddin@...> wrote:



Roger,

Have you built another layout since the Great Eastern?

Christopher



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#12309 Mar 7, 2014

Also worth remembering that in the days of steam EVERYTHING was covered in a larger of soot, so it was race between Mother Nature and coal soot which got to the car first, or anything else nearby. Coal soot usually won hands, covering everything in the stuff, but usually preserving the original color underneath.Try just running a very sharp dark grey or brown coloured pencil down the grooves between the weather boards, it doesn't' take long and you will be surprised at the difference it makes .

Evan



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#12310 Mar 7, 2014

Okay. Some good answers, but one question was not addressed directly:��Can I use contemporary freight car weatherers' techniques, sans graffiti, to weather wood cars?

Using varied base paint from car to car is one technique. Dark grey or brown pencil in grooves is another.

The modern weathering guru's most common mantra is use lots of techniques but always use photos as guides. Since every photo but one that I have of my railroad prototype is black and white, and the era I want to model is mid 30's which is at least 5-10 years before any general railroad color photos, what photos can I use to best replicate weathering techniques used for modern cars on wood cars?

Dave Bott



Sent from my iPad



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