Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale? Birds nests/ground cover


Aug 5, 2009

 


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#9111 Aug 5, 2009

(www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra/pages/164a%20-%202-10-0%20No%20164%20switches%20Berger%20Yard%2C%20Atwater.htm)



Don't know if that's the effect you're after but I use a combination of

several layers of make-up applied with a 1/2" soft paint brush, followed by

and over spray of Dulcote followed by an India ink wash applied with very

fast flapping motion with a 21/2" fan brush, to remove most of the India ink

and avoid those watermarks as to tone everything down, followed by a final

coating of Dulcote. Repeat any single step until desired results are

obtained.



Cheers.



Roger T.

See the GER at: -

www.islandnet.com/~rogertra/



----------------------------

#9114 Aug 6, 2009

Roger,



Your example is great - but it's not what I'm looking for.



What I'm trying to achieve are those distinctive 'stains'

that have a definite appearance of a "run" of liquid -

where the edges of the 'stain' are very definite/recent and

straight down the side of the tender almost as though they

were "cut in" by a skilled painter.

Yes, I realize/know that the water spills dried and didn't

look that way very long. But for the first mile or two after

they took on water they did. And some of the road dust/grime

would attach itself to the tender while it was wet. And

if it was oil then it would be there until it was cleaned ...

and if the evidence in the Huxtable book can be trusted it

seems to have happened fairly frequently - and, of course,

the presence of a spill would be a lot more noticeable on a

tender painted in Daylight colors than it would on a black one.

- Jim



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#9115 Aug 6, 2009

Also depends on the type of fuel oil you want toshow down the sides of the tender. I remember watching a "mass produced" railvideo several years ago on the U.P. turbines. Those turbines ran on "Bunker Cfuel" which had to be "pre-heated" in the storage tanks at the yards and in thetenders of the locomotives.��Bunker C was real thick stuff, cheap also.Which was why ALCO and GE designed the turbines to burn Bunker C. When theBunker C "spilled over" it was black as coal and "stuck" to whatever it came incontact with.������Probably primarily because the material I'm usingis 1-1 scale running on a 1:87 scale model - so it can't really behave thesame way as it would if



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#9116 Aug 6, 2009

Roger,

>

> Your example is great - but it's not what I'm looking for.



I tried. :-)



How about using a gloss varnish but applied using the same technique? Use a

firm paint brush, say 1/4" using a dry brush technique and flick the brush

down (only) from the top of the tender to simulate the water shine left by

the overflow running down the side of the tender. You need to make sure the

brush is almost dry, place the tip of the bristles just on the lip of the

tender and then flick or snap/drag the tip down the tender side. Hard to

explain in words but easy to do.



Try it on a piece of scrap, black plastic first. Might be worth a try.



Cheers.



Roger T.

See the GER at: -

www.islandnet.com/~rogertra/



----------------------------

#9120 Aug 7, 2009

Jim,



I think the effect you are after is not achieved with the use of washes.



Try this.



Take your acrylic color, white for example, and mix it with matte medium.

About one part color to 20 parts medium. Mix well.



Then paint this mixture onto your surface. As you are actually painting it

the color will be solid white. But when the paint dries the medium will

become clear leaving only the trace amount of white showing.



If this is too dark try another test with one part color to 40 parts medium.

If it was too light, simply paint another coat over the first.



And now for another great tip which sounds gross but works.



When blending small amounts of color onto a surface, instead of using water

or alcohol as the medium, put saliva on the surface instead.



This is not April first and this is not a joke. Saliva works great for this

for some reason. Just don't tell anyone how you did it.



Darryl Huffman

12020 Old Seward Highway

Anchorage, AK 99515



Interested in casting detail parts?

www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3_1.html



----------------------------

#9121 Aug 7, 2009

You're right about the saliva, Darryl - don't ask how I know! But how do you get the bubbles out?!



Now if you'll forgive me for drifting slightly off-topic, what about this:



I know a fella who took condoms back in the day when they were made of sheep's bladders and called french letters, and he used them to make sails for a model sailing ship which stood for many years at the docks on his model railroad. The sails looked fantastic too, just like oiled sailcloth.



Someone's bound to wonder: he never told whether the condoms were used or not!



-John Le Forestier, Toronto





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#9122 Aug 7, 2009

First, I asked Hal Carstens for the OK to post some images and articles

> from an old RMC to a Yahoo Group





That'll be a bit difficult. He's dead.



Cheers.



Roger T.

See the GER at: -

www.islandnet.com/~rogertra/







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#9123 Aug 7, 2009

A normal person would think your joking, but these "HO" and "N scale" PT boats:

img.photobucket.com/albums/v235/foley777/IMG00018-1.jpg

Are made from medical waste and garbage:

img.photobucket.com/albums/v235/foley777/IMG00002b.jpg

Bob Foley --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, John Le Forestier johnleforestier@...> wrote:

>

>

> You're right about the saliva, Darryl - don't ask how I know! But how do you get the bubbles out?!

>

> Now if you'll forgive me for drifting slightly off-topic, what about this:

>

> I know a fella who took condoms back in the day when they were made of sheep's bladders and called french letters, and he used them to make sails for a model sailing ship which stood for many years at the docks on his model railroad. The sails looked fantastic too, just like oiled sailcloth.

>

> Someone's bound to wonder: he never told whether the condoms were used or not!

>

> -John Le Forestier, Toronto

>

>

---------------

> Looking for the perfect gift? Give the gift of Flickr!

>

> www.flickr.com/gift/

>



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#9124 Aug 8, 2009

Roger: Yes he is. I don't know the exact year of his death but I imagine it was a generation ago! I just e-mailed the Craftsman. The E-mail reply I got was signed by a guy called Hal Carstens, though. I was surprised, but then I presumed it to be from his son. I don't know the ins and outs. This was four, maybe five years ago. -John

--- On Fri, 8/7/09, Roger T. rogertra@...> wrote:



> From: Roger T. rogertra@...>

> Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale?

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> Received: Friday, August 7, 2009, 9:03 PM

>

>

>

> > First, I asked Hal Carstens for the OK to post some

> images and articles

> > from an old RMC to a Yahoo Group

>

>

> That'll be a bit difficult.. He's dead.

>

> Cheers.

>

> Roger T.

> See the GER at: -

> www.islandnet.com/~rogertra/

>

>

>

>

---------------

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

> . . mailto:weathering-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

>

>

>





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#9125 Aug 8, 2009

Roger: Yes he is. I don't know the exact year of his death but I imagine it was a generation ago! I just e-mailed the Craftsman. The E-mail reply I got was signed by a guy called Hal Carstens, though. I was surprised, but then I presumed it to be from his son. I don't know the ins and outs. This was four, maybe five years ago. -John

--- On Fri, 8/7/09, Roger T. rogertra@...> wrote:



> From: Roger T. rogertra@...>

> Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale?

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> Received: Friday, August 7, 2009, 9:03 PM

>

>

>

> > First, I asked Hal Carstens for the OK to post some

> images and articles

> > from an old RMC to a Yahoo Group

>

>

> That'll be a bit difficult.. He's dead.

>

> Cheers.

>

> Roger T.

> See the GER at: -

> www.islandnet.com/~rogertra/

>

>

>

>

---------------

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

> . . mailto:weathering-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com

>

>

>





---------------

Looking for the perfect gift? Give the gift of Flickr!



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----------------------------

#9126 Aug 8, 2009

Hal Carstens passed away June 23, 2009.�� Railroad Model Craftsman washis magazine.��Keevan��In a message dated 8/8/2009 7:16:47 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time,johnleforestier@... writes:Roger:Yes he is.�� I don't know the exact year of his death but I imagine it wasa generation ago!�� I just e-mailed the Craftsman.�� The E-mail replyI got was signed by a guy called Hal Carstens, though.�� I was surprised,but then I presumed it to be from his son.�� I don't know the ins andouts.�� This was four, maybe five years ago. -John

--- On Fri,8/7/09, Roger T. rogertra@...> wrote:

> From:Roger T. rogertra@...>> Subject: Re: [weathering]Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale?> To:weathering@yahoogroups.com> Received: Friday, August 7, 2009, 9:03PM> > > > > First, I asked Hal Carstens for theOK to post some> images and articles > > from an old RMC to aYahoo Group> > > That'll be a bit difficult.�� He'sdead.> > Cheers.> > RogerT.



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#9128 Aug 8, 2009

I'm impressed by the PT Boats. Does the hobby make one abnormal, or does it help to be abnormal before one begins? -John L



--- On Fri, 8/7/09, foleyenterprises777 > A normal person would think your

> joking.....





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#9129 Aug 8, 2009

Hi,



Thanks for all the suggestions. I'm going to be doing some experimenting

on this project ... but not "right away". I have to wait a couple of weeks

to check with the owner of the loco (I'm doing it for someone else who is

'afraid' of weathering) to make certain I know what he wants - and he is out

of town.

I'll let you know how it goes.



On posting the images ... I wouldn't even consider asking Nils for

permission. It's a -book- not a magazine and permission to post the

images would probably have to come from the publisher ... and even if

I could obtain permission it would take too long.

I was thinking that some of you would have the book and be able to

look at it to see exactly what I'm talking about. Guess there aren't

that many Daylight lovers on this list as on some others. *G*

From the answers I'd say that many of you know what I'm talking

about.



The one variable that makes this particular project difficult is that

it is a Daylight tender. That means that I'll be doing this 'run'

across bright reds and oranges and silver decal stripes and ... well

you get the picture.

I'm treating it as something that I'm only going to get to do "once"

and that if it isn't right the first time it's likely to look terrible

and I'm going to be faced with stripping and re-painting a brass

tender ... and trying to match the new paint to the factory paint that

is on the loco. This is -not- something I want to even attempt!

So I'm "going slow" and asking questions and will be doing some testing

and ... well, let's just say that this project has to be approached

differently than the way I'd approach doing a freight car. Oh yes ... and

I need to say again "the model isn't mine".



Again - thanks for all of your suggestions, they -do- help. If any

of you have ever seen a weathered Daylight loco I'd appreciate talking

to the owner ... every one I've ever seen was "paint shop fresh" and

the owner of this one noticed the pics in his Huxtable book and said

to me "I'd like it to look kind of like these" and shoved the book in

my hands.

- Jim







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#9130 Aug 8, 2009

Lennard Stewart wrote:



���������������������� Hi John and Roger and Everyone else



�������������������� Hal Carstens just passed away in June of this year. He wasin his 80's.

Lennard StewartOwner of groups.yahoo.com/group/1-87scalevehiclesales/



John Le Forestier wrote:��

Roger: Yes he is. I don't know the exact year of his death but Iimagine it was a generation ago! I just e-mailed the Craftsman. TheE-mail reply I got was signed by a guy called Hal Carstens, though. Iwas surprised, but then I presumed it to be from his son. I don't knowthe ins and outs. This was four, maybe five years ago. -John



--- On Fri, 8/7/09, Roger T. rogertra@highspeedp lus.com>wrote:



> From: Roger T. rogertra@highspeedp lus.com>

> Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale?

> To: weathering@yahoogro ups.com

> Received: Friday, August 7, 2009, 9:03 PM

>

>

>

> > First, I asked Hal Carstens for the OK to post some

> images and articles

> > from an old RMC to a Yahoo Group

>

>

> That'll be a bit difficult.�� He's dead.

>

> Cheers.

>

> Roger T.

> See the GER at: -

> www.islandne t.com/~rogertra/

>

>

>

>

> ------------ --------- --------- ------

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

> �� �� mailto:weathering-fullfeat ured@yahoogroups .com

>

>

>



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----------------------------

#9131 Aug 8, 2009

Roger: Yes he is. I don't know the exact year of his death but I imagine it

was a generation ago! I just e-mailed the Craftsman. The E-mail reply I

got was signed by a guy called Hal Carstens, though. I was surprised, but

then I presumed it to be from his son. I don't know the ins and outs. This

was four, maybe five years ago. -John



---------------



Yes, I too rec'd an e-mail from RMC signed Hal Carstens this past week

though the founder Hal Carstens died June 23rd 2009.



Cheers.



Roger T.

See the GER at: -

www.islandnet.com/~rogertra/



----------------------------

#9132 Aug 8, 2009

Jim,

If this has been suggested before, please excuse my duplication.Cut a very narrow "V" in the edge of a 3 X 5 card or a business card and use it as a mask or stencil. Line up the opening with the top edge of the car, make sure you have the cut vertical and spray your glossy color coat. You can, obviously make a double cut with one being shorter or just move the single card. There is an advantage to this method. You don't have to lick either the car or the card.We're all waiting for pictures, Jim.Dick Dale

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#9133 Aug 8, 2009

I'd like to see those pictures, but since I can't, here's some miscellaneous ideas for getting a) thin streaks and b) streaks to go where you want them.



1. Watercolorists know that wet will follow wet, so if you draw a thin line of wetting agent on the tender, the flow will tend to follow that line, even if it's wiggly. 2. Watercolorists use a very thin sable brush called a rigger or liner brush. This has very few, but very long hairs. Originally used for painting the lines of sailing craft rigging in watercolor paintings, they give very good control- a bit expensive, 'tho. 3. Not quite as good, a wooden toothpick makes a pretty good quill. Plastic toothpicks in particular can be trained to draw very thin lines, but they do require some practice. 4. Finally, the edge of a painter's pallette knife will draw color along after it, and might work very well to 'guide' your drip along. Again, all this depends on just what those famous drips of yours actually do look like!



Still pulling for you,

-John Le Forestier, Toronto









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----------------------------

#9147 Aug 9, 2009

Darryl, I won't tell anyone about the 'spit,' but I'm really interested in how you went about discovering this phenomenon. This gives new meaning to the word, "Experimentation." ...Tom

--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Darryl Huffman" darrylhuffman@...> wrote:

>

> Jim,

>

> I think the effect you are after is not achieved with the use of washes.

>

> Try this.

>

> Take your acrylic color, white for example, and mix it with matte medium.

> About one part color to 20 parts medium. Mix well.

>

> Then paint this mixture onto your surface. As you are actually painting it

> the color will be solid white. But when the paint dries the medium will

> become clear leaving only the trace amount of white showing.

>

> If this is too dark try another test with one part color to 40 parts medium.

> If it was too light, simply paint another coat over the first.

>

> And now for another great tip which sounds gross but works.

>

> When blending small amounts of color onto a surface, instead of using water

> or alcohol as the medium, put saliva on the surface instead.

>

> This is not April first and this is not a joke. Saliva works great for this

> for some reason. Just don't tell anyone how you did it.

>

> Darryl Huffman

> 12020 Old Seward Highway

> Anchorage, AK 99515

>

> Interested in casting detail parts?

> www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3_1.html

>







----------------------------

#9148 Aug 9, 2009

Tom,



I have spent most of my time in this hobby trying to come up with better

ways to do things.



When weathering with acrylics, I was looking for a fluid that had more body

than water but without using matte medium as a carrier. Saliva is always

handy.



You should know also that when using the crushed salt under paint techique

that wetting the surface with saliva is much better than wetting the surface

with water.



The body of the saliva causes the paint to look more like it lifted off the

surface rather than chipped off the surface.



Most people accept I am fairly odd - - - - but harmless.



When I asked everyone on the finescaleminiatures list to trim their

fingernails and mail the clippings to me a few years ago I got lots of

clippings and a few very odd letters with the nailes.



The clippings were to represent HO scale dinosaur ribs in my dinosaur

diorama:



darrylhuffman.50megs.com/photo6.html



Darryl Huffman

12020 Old Seward Highway

Anchorage, AK 99515



Interested in casting detail parts?

www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3_1.html



----- Original Message -----

From: "tomgschilling" tomgschilling@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2009 3:00 PM

Subject: [weathering] Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale?





> Darryl, I won't tell anyone about the 'spit,' but I'm really interested in

> how you went about discovering this phenomenon. This gives new meaning to

> the word, "Experimentation." ...Tom



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#9149 Aug 9, 2009

Uh, Darryl, maybe some of the members could send you some belly button lint so you can line all those bird nests.Dick

---------------

Compete with the big boys. Click here to find products to benefit your business.



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#9150 Aug 9, 2009

Asking for people to send you finger nail clippings? Darryl, I think the deep freeze of Alaska has freezer-burned your brain!



You comment about saliva is correct: it has more body than H2O. Included in the saliva is mucus. It's primary non-water component is of long chains of polysaccharides, which greatly increases the viscosity and adherence to the salt you use in your weathering technique. I purchased your excellent DVD on weathering and used the technique you described and demonstrated on a scratch-built bridge. Boy, does the salt make the bridge's paint look pealed and weathered.



As for the use of saliva instead of water in mixing with acrylic paint, the major enzyme of saliva, amylase, which immediate begins the process of digestion, especially of carbohydrates. Although not a carbohydrate, acrylics are a type of carboxylate, which would be degredated, by chemical reaction of the amylase, thus making the acyrlic's color less intense. In other words, spit works!



Wes



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#9151 Aug 9, 2009

Thanks Dick.



Actually, I find the best lint for lining those bird's nests is "dust

bunnies". Just the kind of lint that gathers naturally somewhere.



My daughter thought the limit to my oddness came with wanting some of her

blonde hair for weeds.



I assume everyone knows that ear wax on the tip of a very tiny Phillips

screwdriver is great for holding a tiny screw when getting it started.



I won't tell you about the claim on another group about the way I dye my

yellow t-shirts.



Darryl Huffman

12020 Old Seward Highway

Anchorage, AK 99515



Interested in casting detail parts?

www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3_1.html



----- Original Message -----

From: dickdale@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2009 4:29 PM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale?





Uh, Darryl, maybe some of the members could send you some belly button lint

so you can line all those bird nests.

Dick



----------------------------

#9152 Aug 9, 2009

Wes.



In the famous words of Slim Pickens in Blazing Saddles: "Ditto!"





Darryl Huffman

12020 Old Seward Highway

Anchorage, AK 99515



Interested in casting detail parts?

www.darrylhuffman.50megs.com/custom3_1.html



----- Original Message -----

From: "Wesley Shankland" drwes@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Sunday, August 09, 2009 4:46 PM

Subject: [weathering] Re: Liquid 'spills' in 1:87 scale?





> Asking for people to send you finger nail clippings? Darryl, I think the

> deep freeze of Alaska has freezer-burned your brain!

>

> You comment about saliva is correct: it has more body than H2O. Included

> in the saliva is mucus. It's primary non-water component is of long

> chains of polysaccharides, which greatly increases the viscosity and

> adherence to the salt you use in your weathering technique. I purchased

> your excellent DVD on weathering and used the technique you described and

> demonstrated on a scratch-built bridge. Boy, does the salt make the

> bridge's paint look pealed and weathered.

>

> As for the use of saliva instead of water in mixing with acrylic paint,

> the major enzyme of saliva, amylase, which immediate begins the process of

> digestion, especially of carbohydrates. Although not a carbohydrate,

> acrylics are a type of carboxylate, which would be degredated, by chemical

> reaction of the amylase, thus making the acyrlic's color less intense. In

> other words, spit works!

>

> Wes







----------------------------

#9156 Aug 10, 2009

On Aug 9, 2009, at 8:51 PM, Darryl Huffman wrote:

> I won't tell you about the claim on another group about the way I

> dye my

> yellow t-shirts.



Is that technique in any of your videos? :)



Jerry Jankura

So many toys.... So little time....



----------------------------

#9157 Aug 10, 2009

Belly button lint? Drier lint worksbetter. Also an endless source---Cliff F



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