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Re: [weathering] Re: fast drying acrylics


Aug 27, 2010

 


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#10290 Aug 27, 2010

I don't know if this comes under the heading of "weathering" but I've been doing my own lettering on a Hartford Hobart Estates caboose with acrylic ink and a very fine nib pen. It seems that the ink drys to the point that it won't flow in a very short time. I've tried using distilled water to thin the ink. It will re-wet the ink, but for a very short time. I've tried windshield washer fluid but I still experience a very limited time before the ink won't flow in the pen. I'm sure that others have encountered this problem before and have come up with a solution (sic) that I have yet to discover. Is there anyone out there who can point me in the right direction? Thanks.



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#10291 Aug 27, 2010

I have used for testing only a product called Golden Retarder, it is a acrylic medium that you mix into the paint at different ratios to slow the dry time, so far my tests have resulted in 45 minutes of dry time with working time of nearly 15 minutes.

Hope this helps

Dave Schroedle

www.protoweathering.com/SMF



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#10292 Aug 28, 2010

I will admit up front that I know nothing about the composition of the paint or product you are using, but I wonder if you might try adding a surfactant. Perhaps a drop of dish washing fluid would help make the stuff flow better before it dries. Is the diluent(solvent)indeed just water or some sort of alcohol? That could be a big issue. If it is alcohol, adding just water may be causing the stuff to become stiff or even slightly "rubbery" in a molecular sense. After all what we see with our eyes may or may not reflect the actual chemistry of the situation.



When all else fails, you might even contact the technical support section of the manufacturer of the product. If they want to sell the product, they may be willing to help as long as it doesn't involve proprietary information.



Not to make this any longer than needed, but you could even get some Flowtrol (sp?). It's the stuff you add to latex house paint to make it "flow" better. I believe that hinders drying thus making paint go on better with a brush or roller.



Gene Cimino



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#10306 Sep 7, 2010

Hello Dave.�� Thanks for the suggestion.�� I knew someone out therewould have an answer.�� I haven't had a chance to try it yet but itsounds like exactly what is needed.



royce



PS sorry for the delayed response - I'm time challenged.

On 8/27/2010 7:01 PM, Hummerdave wrote:��I have used for testing only a product called GoldenRetarder, it is a acrylic medium that you mix into thepaint at different ratios to slow the dry time, so far mytests have resulted in 45 minutes of dry time with workingtime of nearly 15 minutes.

Hope this helps

Dave Schroedle

www.protoweathering.com/SMF



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#10307 Sep 7, 2010

Hi Gene.�� Thank you for your thoughtful response to my question.�� Myperception is that the problem is premature polymerization of theink.�� I don't know what the soluent is but I've tried both distilledwater and alcohol.�� In addition, I've tried windshield washer fluidwhich has been suggested as a surfactant - to no avail.�� Oncepolymerization begins any solvent seems ineffective at restoring theoriginal viscosity.



Hummer Dave has suggested a "retarder" that I have yet to try.�� Butit is designed to retard "drying".�� I am hopeful that it will work.



Your suggestion of contacting the mfg's tech support is an excellentone.�� I have yet to do so.



Thanks for taking the time to address my quesiton.



royce



On 8/28/2010 1:38 PM, Gene Cimino wrote:��I will admit up front that I know nothing about thecomposition of the paint or product you are using, but Iwonder if you might try adding a surfactant. Perhaps adrop of dish washing fluid would help make the stuff flowbetter before it dries. Is the diluent(solvent)indeed justwater or some sort of alcohol? That could be a big issue.If it is alcohol, adding just water may be causing thestuff to become stiff or even slightly "rubbery" in amolecular sense. After all what we see with our eyes mayor may not reflect the actual chemistry of the situation.



When all else fails, you might even contact the technicalsupport section of the manufacturer of the product. Ifthey want to sell the product, they may be willing to helpas long as it doesn't involve proprietary information.



Not to make this any longer than needed, but you couldeven get some Flowtrol (sp?). It's the stuff you add tolatex house paint to make it "flow" better. I believe thathinders drying thus making paint go on better with a brushor roller.



Gene Cimino



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#10645 Feb 2, 2011

I have used Liquitex's Flow-Aid and have found it did a pretty good job getting my older paints to flow again. Here's a description...��Flow-Aid Fluid Additive increases the flow, absorbency, and blending of any water-based paint, ink, or dye. Minimizes brushstrokes. Use it with Liquitex Soft Body color to create very fluid washes without hard edges, to create staining effects on raw canvas, and to produce a fluid spray when mixed with acrylics in airbrushes or spray guns.





From: Royce lulu800@...>To: weathering@yahoogroups.comSent: Tue, September 7, 2010 8:29:03 PMSubject: Re: [weathering] Re: fast drying acrylics

��Hi Gene.�� Thank you for your thoughtful response to my question.�� My perception is that the problem is premature polymerization of the ink.�� I don't know what the soluent is but I've tried both distilled water and alcohol.�� In addition, I've tried windshield washer fluid which has been suggested as a surfactant - to no avail.�� Once polymerization begins any solvent seems ineffective at restoring the original viscosity.

Hummer Dave has suggested a "retarder" that I have yet to try.�� But it is designed to retard "drying".�� I am hopeful that it will work.

Your suggestion of contacting the mfg's tech support is an excellent one.�� I have yet to do so.

Thanks for taking the time to address my quesiton.

royce



On 8/28/2010 1:38 PM, Gene Cimino wrote:��I will admit up front that I know nothing about the composition of the paint or product you are using, but I wonder if you might try adding a surfactant. Perhaps a drop of dish washing fluid would help make the stuff flow better before it dries. Is the diluent(solvent)indeed just water or some sort of alcohol? That could be a big issue. If it is alcohol, adding just water may be causing the stuff to become stiff or even slightly "rubbery" in a molecular sense. After all what we see with our eyes may or may not reflect the actual chemistry of the situation.

When all else fails, you might even contact the technical support section of the manufacturer of the product. If they want to sell the product, they may be willing to help as long as it doesn't involve proprietary information.

Not to make this any longer than needed, but you could even get some Flowtrol (sp?). It's the stuff you add to latex house paint to make it "flow" better. Ibelieve that hinders drying thus making paint go on better with a brush or roller.

Gene Cimino







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