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Re: [weathering] Re: Bragdon vs Doc O'brien's weathering chalks


Jun 2 8:04 AM

 


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#11033 Jun 2 8:04 AM

Has any one had experience with both Bragdon and Doc O'Brien's weathering chalks? If so, which did you prefer, and why? Thank you.



Pete Nelson



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#11034 Jun 2 8:30 AM

I've been using Bragdon's for several years now and am quite satisfied withhow it works.�� Not experienced with the other, no motivation to,��socan't comment.��Bragdon's contains a micro-adhesive that is activated upon rubbing it onand adheres very well.�� I don't use any overspray afterwards as it sticksquite well without it.�� Even with the handling of rolling stock.��Before I came upon Bragdon's I was using ladies eye shadow and thelike.�� Before that, used atrists' chalks.��Keevan��In a message dated 6/2/2011 9:04:30 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time,pnelson01@... writes:Has anyone had experience with both Bragdon and Doc O'Brien's weathering chalks? Ifso, which did you prefer, and why? Thank you.

PeteNelson



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#11035 Jun 2 11:03 AM

I've used all three....Dr. Ben's work better, has better service and more colors.��www.debenllc.com/servlet/the-Doctor-Ben%27s-Scale-Consortium-cln--dsh--Weathering-Pigments/Categories



��Scott G. Perry, CPMUtah Society of Railroad ModelersNMRA Rocky Mtn Region DirectorEditor, RMR CallboardNMRA #110470



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#11036 Jun 3 6:21 AM

How well does the Dr. Bens hold up to handling? Do you have to overspray with clear flat to fix it?



Mike Conder



scott perry@... wrote: >

> I've used all three....Dr. Ben's work better, has better service and more colors.



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#11038 Jun 3 9:23 AM

Hi,



I've used Dr. Ben's and Bragdon's but not Doc O'Briens.

Neither of the ones I've used are "chalks". They are

weathering powders. As in "pigments". They work well.

But they are permanent - they 'bond' with the surface

in ways that "chalks" don't.

One place I do -not- like these pigments is "any where

around the track" ... such as for coloring ballast on

the side of the right-of-way. The color goes on 'wrong'

and looks like 'stains' rather than 'weathering'. And

the way they discolor the ties is "all wrong" (to my eye).

I do like them on structures or rolling stock - but

you have to KNOW ahead how it will come out ... due to

the 'permanent' nature of them. I ruined 3 or 4 models

before I figured it out to a point where I can use them

effectively. Start with an old shake the box kit!

The 'trick' - as in all weathering - is to start small

(slight effect) and work up to the level you want.



I have been using "artist's chalks" (brand name is/was

Alphacolor) for a couple of decades or more. A friend of

mine and I bought a box each of the greys (white to black

and about 10 colors in between) and the "earth tones". We

took the two boxes of sticks of chalk and broke the sticks

in half and each of us ended up with a single box of both

color sets but half a stick of each color.

And if the chalks don't look right you can literally

"wash them off and start over" with very little residue.

Most of the time now I use chalks in a "wet slurry". I

mix several colors to a blend/shade/color that I want (dry),

add water and a few drops of white glue (Krystal Klear) as

a binder ... keep stirring and letting it sit until the

slurry is consistent and there are very few clumps of

chalk left (or none depending upon need), apply with an

eye dropper, let dry (at least a couple of hours, usually

more) - and repeat as necessary.

Chalks are an excellent way to get those 'detritus'

effects for the roofs of freight cars or in the bed of

a gon.

Another 'trick' with chalks is to actually "go for" the

clumps in the slurry ... and then after they are dry to

use your finger to 'draw' the clumps in the direction you

want a 'stain' (such as towards the edge of the roof).

Or a small clump on the side of a box car that when 'drawn'

with your finger makes a great representation of a rust

stain that is 'weeping' color from a 'blow out'.



I use acrylic washes almost always in any situation where

I might consider some of these 'pigments'. On most of

my structures/rolling stock I end up with a combination

of chalks plus acrylic washes. If I eliminate either of

those it will be the chalks.



I also use lacquer washes - they produce an entirely

different effect. Thin to a -very- thin level and apply

with a brush and it will 'flow' into the corners where

two surfaces meet in ways that acrylic washes won't.

This technique is especially useful for getting that

"hint of rust starting to form" look on dark colors

such as black or charcoal.

- Jim



P.S. I started out to just respond to the subject

question ... but this turned into a "book" ...



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#11039 Jun 3 12:48 PM

For some reason it bonds much better than the others.�� Still all of them come off with some kind of friction, but I have some freight cars that have heavy handling with no clear coat and they are fine.

��Scott G. Perry, CPMUtah Society of Railroad ModelersNMRA Rocky Mtn Region DirectorEditor, RMR CallboardNMRA #110470



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#11040 Jun 4 6:37 AM

Thanks to everyone for a most interesting discussion.



As a side note on chalks/pastels, I use wallboard sanding screen to reduce these to 'chalkdust', in fact I have a spice jar where I've replaced the transparent lid insert with a piece of wallboard screen. Rub the pastel over the screen and the dust collects in the jar :-)



dave







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#11067 Jun 7 10:30 AM

Hi Jim,



Thanks for the reply. I really liked your weathering techniques and can't wait to try some of them. I remember 45 years ago I weathered a Camino On3 gon with powdered chalk and then I rubbed cigar ask onto the sides. Very effective. Again, thanks.



Pete



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