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Re: [weathering] Re: Airbrush Recommendations


Oct 19, 2004

 


----------------------------

#917 Oct 19, 2004

I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by

the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good and bad.



Thanks,



Barry



----------------------------

#919 Oct 19, 2004

Generally, I prefer an airbrush that you can control both the paint flow and

the air flow. This is called "double acting".



As for brand, your budget will dictate what you buy. For most modeling

painting, the lower cost airbrushes do a fine job. Having an interchangeable

paint cup is well worth having. I prefer the brushes that have screw top

lids on plastic bottles that then insert into the bottom of the brush. You

can mix several colors and interchange them without completely cleaning the

airbrush each time. This is much faster, and you waste a lot less paint. I

have Badger and Aztek brand brushes, and I like both of them. I also have a

single acting brush that I used for years, and though I was quite proficient

with it, I have laid it aside because of the ease of using the double acting

tools.



You might try E-Bay for some bargains, but IMHO, it is worth holding a few

brushes and seeing which you like before you purchase. You might also check

with a local art school or sign painting/hot rod painting shop to get their

opinions. Also, check with nail salons, as they often use airbrushes to

paint flames and little trains on fingertips! :)



Tom

----- Original Message -----

From: "Barry_Roth" barry_roth@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 11:59 PM

Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations





>

>

> I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by

> the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good and bad.

>

> Thanks,

>

> Barry



----------------------------

#920 Oct 19, 2004

Barry,



I undertook an Adult Education Course on airbrushing. Their recommendation

is to buy something of the quality of Badger.



Good airbrushes will

1..Be made of non ferrous material.

many cheaper airbrushes will rust from the inside to outside.

2..Have washers and seals that are immune to solvents (Usually Teflon).

Rubber washers prone to solvent abuse.

3..Spare parts are readily available.

Very important as moving parts can ware down



If it is your first airbrush go for a double action type. Once you have

mastered it( which won't take much time at all) a single action is little

better than an expensive spray gun.



I have two Badgers a single (200) and a double (150) action. Parts are

interchangeable between both. A friend of mine uses an "anthem" for very

fine work.



Go for quality as in the final analysis, all the time you have spent

modelling will be lost with a poor paint job. Try DIXIE ART

www.dixieart.com/ in new Orleans for a good price. All their brushes

are at the quality end of the market. I imported a Badger (150) to

Australia from them.







Regards

Rod Hutchinson

---------------

Melbourne, Australia



From: Barry_Roth

I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by the

number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any recommendations

by list members, or reports of experience -- good and bad.



Thanks,



Barry









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#923 Oct 20, 2004

Barry,

I've used a Paasche VL double action for several decades, and parts are easy to get.

Phil ----- Original Message -----

From: Barry_Roth

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 9:59 PM

Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations







I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by

the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good and bad.



Thanks,



Barry









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----------------------------

#924 Oct 20, 2004

Barry, forgot to mention a couple of suppliers I like. One is MIster Art online, and the other is Bear Air, online.

Bear has everything at good prices.

Phil ----- Original Message -----

From: Barry_Roth

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 9:59 PM

Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations







I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by

the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good and bad.



Thanks,



Barry









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ADVERTISEMENT











---------------

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weathering-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#926 Oct 20, 2004

I'd suggest that you join the modelairbrush yahoo mailing list and post your

question there, as well. The choice between "single action" or "double

action" brush as been discussed and there are valid opinions as to which of

the two is better, especially for someone first starting out.



My brush is a single action paasche brush (F series); it works for the tasks

I've asked it to perform and is a reliable unit. But, I wouldn't consider

myself knowledgeable enough recommend between the two types.



One question that you didn't ask about was compressors - I'd suggest that

you purchase something from Sears, HD, Lowes, or Menards that has a small

air tank. This'll set you back around $120, but will be usable for

airbrushing, as well as some general purpose shop tasks such as running a

small brad nailer. Just be sure that you get something with a pressure gauge

and adjustment and a moisture trap.



-- Jerry



> I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by

> the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good and bad.

>

> Thanks,

>

> Barry



----------------------------

#927 Oct 20, 2004

I really like my Aztec!



Micro-Mark carries them.



www.micromark.com



Mark

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: Barry_Roth

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 9:59 PM

> Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

>

>

>

> I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by

> the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> recommendations by list members, or reports of experience

> -- good and bad.

>

> Thanks,

>

> Barry



----------------------------

#928 Oct 20, 2004

Greetings,

I have a couple of air brushes I picked up from Harbor Freight for about $9 and $20. The $9 is a single action external mix brush and is all I have used so far. The other is a dual action internal mix but I haven't used it yet. The cheaper of the 2 can be found in stores sometimes for around $5. This might be an option for you to get started without much cost and then as your skill improves you can invest in a more expensive brush. Hobby and some toy stores carry a Badger 150 (I think) external mix brush ($20 the last time I saw one).

I have seen an airbrush and compressor set for $50 at Wal-mart.

www.harborfreight.com

my 0.02

Rob



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----------------------------

#929 Oct 20, 2004

Hi all,

Since the airbrushing thread got started, I have a comment, and a question

on compressors. I bought a $99 Campbell Hausfield compressor at Wal Mart

and have been very satisfied. It is a 2 gal. tank, goes up to 120 or so PSI

and it is really pretty quiet. You can talk when it runs and hear the TV

pretty well also. In a 1 hour spraying session, it only kicks on twice. I

do have a question for old-timers that have used compressors for years.

Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month or

less) or should I let it stay filled up. I have heard that if you keep it

filled, it will wear out the pump or seals or something?



Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris

>From: "Carol & Jerry Jankura"

jerry.jankura@...> >Reply-To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

>To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

>Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

>Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:24:28 -0400

>

>

>I'd suggest that you join the modelairbrush yahoo mailing list and post

your >question there, as well. The choice between "single action" or

"double >action" brush as been discussed and there are valid opinions as to

which of >the two is better, especially for someone first starting out.

>

>My brush is a single action paasche brush (F series); it works for the

tasks >I've asked it to perform and is a reliable unit. But, I wouldn't

consider >myself knowledgeable enough recommend between the two types.

>

>One question that you didn't ask about was compressors - I'd suggest

that >you purchase something from Sears, HD, Lowes, or Menards that has a

small >air tank. This'll set you back around $120, but will be usable for

>airbrushing, as well as some general purpose shop tasks such as running

a >small brad nailer. Just be sure that you get something with a pressure

gauge >and adjustment and a moisture trap.

>

>-- Jerry

>

>

> > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered

by > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good

and bad. > >

> > Thanks,

> >

> > Barry

>

>

>

>

>



----------------------------

#930 Oct 20, 2004

In a message dated 10/20/04 3:09:51 PM Mountain Daylight Time,

bitlerisvj@... writes:



< Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month

or

less) or should I let it stay filled up. >>



Yes. Moisture can accumulate inside and lead to rusting of the metal which

in turn can lead to a violent failure at some future date. Most compressors

I've used have a blowdown on the bottom specifically intended for this purpose

of removing moisture accumulation.



Keevan







----------------------------

#931 Oct 20, 2004

Barry



I have a friend who is extremely happy with his Iwata Eclipse BCS

airbrush that he uses for Acrylics.



www.dixieart.com/Eclipse.html



Dixieart was best price he found on the web. I have seen them start

for more on ebay. Best deal is air brush with hose and quick dis-

connect for $85.



You can also get a finer nozzle and super lube (94 015001) that

makes cleanup real easy, it is listed in part 2 of the catalog that

can be downloaded from their website.



Regards Bill





> > From: Barry_Roth

> > To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> > Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 9:59 PM

> > Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> >

> >

> >

> > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really

bewildered by > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for

any > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience

> > -- good and bad.

> >

> > Thanks,

> >

> > Barry



----------------------------

#932 Oct 20, 2004

Vic,

You should always bleed the tank after each session.

There will always be moisture in the air held in the tank.

That moisture can cause rusting and eventually eat a hole in the wall of

the tank.

Clark Womack





At 05:04 PM 10/20/2004 -0400, you wrote:

>Hi all,

>Since the airbrushing thread got started, I have a comment, and a question

>on compressors. I bought a $99 Campbell Hausfield compressor at Wal Mart

>and have been very satisfied. It is a 2 gal. tank, goes up to 120 or so PSI

>and it is really pretty quiet. You can talk when it runs and hear the TV

>pretty well also. In a 1 hour spraying session, it only kicks on twice. I

>do have a question for old-timers that have used compressors for years.

>Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month or

>less) or should I let it stay filled up. I have heard that if you keep it

>filled, it will wear out the pump or seals or something?

>

>Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris

>

>>From: "Carol & Jerry Jankura"

>jerry.jankura@...>

>>Reply-To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

>>To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

>>Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

>>Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:24:28 -0400

>>

>>

>>I'd suggest that you join the modelairbrush yahoo mailing list and post

>your

>>question there, as well. The choice between "single action" or

>"double

>>action" brush as been discussed and there are valid opinions as to

>which of

>>the two is better, especially for someone first starting out.

>>

>>My brush is a single action paasche brush (F series); it works for the

>tasks

>>I've asked it to perform and is a reliable unit. But, I wouldn't

>consider

>>myself knowledgeable enough recommend between the two types.

>>

>>One question that you didn't ask about was compressors - I'd suggest

>that

>>you purchase something from Sears, HD, Lowes, or Menards that has a

>small

>>air tank. This'll set you back around $120, but will be usable for

>>airbrushing, as well as some general purpose shop tasks such as running

>a

>>small brad nailer. Just be sure that you get something with a pressure

>gauge

>>and adjustment and a moisture trap.

>>

>>-- Jerry

>>

>>

>> > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered

>by

>> > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

>> > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good

>and bad.

>> >

>> > Thanks,

>> >

>> > Barry

>>

>>

>>

>>

>>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>



----------------------------

#933 Oct 20, 2004

Hello Barry,



I used several types of airbrushes throughout the years. By far the best

I've used for Model Railroading is the Badger 155 or 360. See sites below.

They are the same airbrush but the 360 model allows you to spray small

amounts of paint without a bottle.



www.dixieart.com/Badger_155_Anthem_General_Purpose_Airbrush.html

www.dixieart.com/Badger_360_Universal_Swivel_Airbrush.html



I also recommend buying a air compressor that has a tank from Sears, Home

Depot, Harbor Freight, etc. Be sure to use a water trap even in dry

climates.

One other option to supply the air is a 5 lb. C02 tank from a welding shop

which is what I use.



A double action airbrush takes a little longer to get used to but you will

not regret the purchase. I teach people to airbrush using my 155 and it only

takes them a couple of minutes to get used to using it.



Good luck,



Jerry

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Barry_Roth" barry_roth@...>

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 11:59 PM

> Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

>

>

> >

> >

> > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered by

> > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good and

bad. > >

> > Thanks,

> >

> > Barry







----------------------------

#934 Oct 20, 2004

Just to add to the thread,



If you buying a compressor obtain one with a tank rather than one which

pumps straight into the hose. This will ensure smooth flow of air rather

than a pulsating flow. I get moisture in my tank. They should be emptied

and drained daily to reduce rust build up inside and increase tank

longevity.



You will need a pressure gauge and moisture trap.



Gloss finishes should be sprayed at low pressure otherwise the paint dries

in the air and produces a sandy or pitted affect on the model. I spray Gloss

paints around 10-15 PSI. Flat paints are more forgiving.







Regards

Rod Hutchinson





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#936 Oct 20, 2004

Hi, Victor:

> I do have a question for old-timers that have used compressors for years.

> Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month

or > less) or should I let it stay filled up. I have heard that if you keep

it > filled, it will wear out the pump or seals or something?



You should empty and drain your tank, even if you use it on a daily basis,

because the tank will gather and retain moisture that can rust the air

holding tank.



-- Jerry



----------------------------

#937 Oct 20, 2004

I agree with Jerry's recommendation. I'm new to airbrushing but am

getting good results with an Anthem 155. I use acrylics only

(Badger's Modelflex or artist quality medium viscosity paints)



For an air supply, I went to an auto supply store and bought a tank

that I fill at the local gas station - free air and quiet operation.

One fill-up lasts me one or two evenings. This is a low cost

solution; I'll probably get a compressor later.



HTH Bill



--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry & Karen Bengtson"

jkbengtson@c...> wrote: > Hello Barry,

>

> I used several types of airbrushes throughout the years. By far

the best > I've used for Model Railroading is the Badger 155 or 360. See

sites below. > They are the same airbrush but the 360 model allows you to spray

small > amounts of paint without a bottle.

>

>

www.dixieart.com/Badger_155_Anthem_General_Purpose_Airbrush.ht

ml > www.dixieart.com/Badger_360_Universal_Swivel_Airbrush.html

>

> I also recommend buying a air compressor that has a tank from

Sears, Home > Depot, Harbor Freight, etc. Be sure to use a water trap even in dry

> climates.

> One other option to supply the air is a 5 lb. C02 tank from a

welding shop > which is what I use.

>

> A double action airbrush takes a little longer to get used to but

you will > not regret the purchase. I teach people to airbrush using my 155

and it only > takes them a couple of minutes to get used to using it.

>

> Good luck,

>

> Jerry

>

> >

> > ----- Original Message -----

> > From: "Barry_Roth" barry_roth@y...>

> > To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> > Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 11:59 PM

> > Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> >

> >

> > >

> > >

> > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really

bewildered by > > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for

any > > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience --

good and > bad.

> > >

> > > Thanks,

> > >

> > > Barry



----------------------------

#938 Oct 20, 2004

Vic,

I have the same compressor, and have had it charged constantly for about 8 years or more, I have a very small leak, which recharges every few days or so for about 10 seconds, but I think mine is in the connections. Other than that I am very pleased with it.

Tony



Victor Bitleris bitlerisvj@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Since the airbrushing thread got started, I have a comment, and a question

on compressors. I bought a $99 Campbell Hausfield compressor at Wal Mart

and have been very satisfied. It is a 2 gal. tank, goes up to 120 or so PSI

and it is really pretty quiet. You can talk when it runs and hear the TV

pretty well also. In a 1 hour spraying session, it only kicks on twice. I

do have a question for old-timers that have used compressors for years.

Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month or

less) or should I let it stay filled up. I have heard that if you keep it

filled, it will wear out the pump or seals or something?



Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris

>From: "Carol & Jerry Jankura"

jerry.jankura@...> >Reply-To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

>To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

>Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

>Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:24:28 -0400

>

>

>I'd suggest that you join the modelairbrush yahoo mailing list and post

your >question there, as well. The choice between "single action" or

"double >action" brush as been discussed and there are valid opinions as to

which of >the two is better, especially for someone first starting out.

>

>My brush is a single action paasche brush (F series); it works for the

tasks >I've asked it to perform and is a reliable unit. But, I wouldn't

consider >myself knowledgeable enough recommend between the two types.

>

>One question that you didn't ask about was compressors - I'd suggest

that >you purchase something from Sears, HD, Lowes, or Menards that has a

small >air tank. This'll set you back around $120, but will be usable for

>airbrushing, as well as some general purpose shop tasks such as running

a >small brad nailer. Just be sure that you get something with a pressure

gauge >and adjustment and a moisture trap.

>

>-- Jerry

>

>

> > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered

by > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -- good

and bad. > >

> > Thanks,

> >

> > Barry

>

>

>

>

>







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----------------------------

#939 Oct 20, 2004

I have read all the other posts here, and all worry about a tank rupture.

While it is a possibility, I have been using compressors in my modeling for

years, but more importantly, I use them daily in my construction business.

Some of the subs come out who have never drained the tank except when the

poor thing was completely full of water, and I have never seen one rupture

or rust through. So, IMHO, while it is a good idea, draining the tank down

is really kinda unnecessary in the service you will be giving a compressor

pumping up an airbrush. Draining away the water is important, and should be

done at the least daily, but I personally do not worry about completely

draining down the tank.



If you want an inexpensive source of air, consider using a spare tire or

innertube! Paasche and others make Schrader valve adapters that permit you

to attach your airbrush to a valve stem. You can generally get several hours

of continuous spraying out of a tire before you have to go get it aired up

at the corner filling station.



Tom

----- Original Message -----

From: "Victor Bitleris" bitlerisvj@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2004 4:04 PM

Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations





>

> Hi all,

> Since the airbrushing thread got started, I have a comment, and a question

> on compressors. I bought a $99 Campbell Hausfield compressor at Wal Mart

> and have been very satisfied. It is a 2 gal. tank, goes up to 120 or so

PSI

> and it is really pretty quiet. You can talk when it runs and hear the TV

> pretty well also. In a 1 hour spraying session, it only kicks on twice.

I

> do have a question for old-timers that have used compressors for years.

> Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month

or

> less) or should I let it stay filled up. I have heard that if you keep

it

> filled, it will wear out the pump or seals or something?

>

> Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris

>

> >From: "Carol & Jerry Jankura"

> jerry.jankura@...>

> >Reply-To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> >To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> >Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> >Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:24:28 -0400

> >

> >

> >I'd suggest that you join the modelairbrush yahoo mailing list and

post

> your

> >question there, as well. The choice between "single action"

or

> "double

> >action" brush as been discussed and there are valid opinions as

to

> which of

> >the two is better, especially for someone first starting out.

> >

> >My brush is a single action paasche brush (F series); it works for the

> tasks

> >I've asked it to perform and is a reliable unit. But, I wouldn't

> consider

> >myself knowledgeable enough recommend between the two types.

> >

> >One question that you didn't ask about was compressors - I'd suggest

> that

> >you purchase something from Sears, HD, Lowes, or Menards that has a

> small

> >air tank. This'll set you back around $120, but will be usable for

> >airbrushing, as well as some general purpose shop tasks such as

running

> a

> >small brad nailer. Just be sure that you get something with a pressure

> gauge

> >and adjustment and a moisture trap.

> >

> >-- Jerry

> >

> >

> > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered

> by

> > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience --

good

> and bad.

> > >

> > > Thanks,

> > >

> > > Barry

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>

>

>



----------------------------

#940 Oct 20, 2004

Greetings,

I have the same compressor (Harbor Freight). It is great for airbrushing

and other small jobs. I have a regular connection on one side and a

regulator/moisure trap and hose for the airbrush on the other. Can't

beat the price (then). Checker Auto Parts has similar compressors for

about $50.00, Altrade, Coleman etc.

Rob, KC7WVN

Cobalt Creek and Western

RK Industries



On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 17:04:18 -0400 "Victor Bitleris"

bitlerisvj@...> writes: >

> Hi all,

> Since the airbrushing thread got started, I have a comment, and a

> question

> on compressors. I bought a $99 Campbell Hausfield compressor at Wal

> Mart

> and have been very satisfied.

snip>



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----------------------------

#941 Oct 20, 2004

When I was learning about air tanks and uses, I was told about draining

also. However it wasn't about rust in the tank as much as it was about

getting water vapor into whatever the air was being used for.

This is even more important in airbrushing. If you're painting Floquil, for

example, the last thing you want is getting water mixed into the paint. Even

painting water-based paints, the mist from the tank could change the mix you

are trying to use.

Although I don't have a tank, more's the pity, I do have a vapor trap on my

compressor. BTW - I also have quick-connects on the compressor and the ends

of the air brush hoses (I have two). That's well worth the effort if you

don't leave the air brush set up all the time.

The biggest advantage in having a tank, which I haven't seen mentioned yet,

is you can have the tank pressure set to 50psi, then set the regulator on

the tank exit pipe for 5-15psi for air brushing. This keeps the compressor

off longer, which saves on electricity.

Bert







----------------------------

#942 Oct 21, 2004

How do you regulate the pressure? I tried that approach and the small regulator that I bought at Home Depot did not do the job>



Ken





----- Original Message -----

From: wmckenney

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 12:18 AM

Subject: [weathering] Re: Airbrush Recommendations







I agree with Jerry's recommendation. I'm new to airbrushing but am

getting good results with an Anthem 155. I use acrylics only

(Badger's Modelflex or artist quality medium viscosity paints)



For an air supply, I went to an auto supply store and bought a tank

that I fill at the local gas station - free air and quiet operation.

One fill-up lasts me one or two evenings. This is a low cost

solution; I'll probably get a compressor later.



HTH Bill



--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry & Karen Bengtson"

jkbengtson@c...> wrote:

> Hello Barry,

>

> I used several types of airbrushes throughout the years. By far

the best

> I've used for Model Railroading is the Badger 155 or 360. See

sites below.

> They are the same airbrush but the 360 model allows you to spray

small

> amounts of paint without a bottle.

>

>

www.dixieart.com/Badger_155_Anthem_General_Purpose_Airbrush.ht

ml

> www.dixieart.com/Badger_360_Universal_Swivel_Airbrush.html

>

> I also recommend buying a air compressor that has a tank from

Sears, Home

> Depot, Harbor Freight, etc. Be sure to use a water trap even in dry

> climates.

> One other option to supply the air is a 5 lb. C02 tank from a

welding shop

> which is what I use.

>

> A double action airbrush takes a little longer to get used to but

you will

> not regret the purchase. I teach people to airbrush using my 155

and it only

> takes them a couple of minutes to get used to using it.

>

> Good luck,

>

> Jerry

>

> >

> > ----- Original Message -----

> > From: "Barry_Roth" barry_roth@y...>

> > To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> > Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 11:59 PM

> > Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> >

> >

> > >

> > >

> > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really

bewildered by

> > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for

any

> > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience --

good and

> bad.

> > >

> > > Thanks,

> > >

> > > Barry









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----------------------------

#943 Oct 21, 2004

Trouble with that is there is no pressure regulation. You will gradually go from say 40 lbs. (too high) to 5 lbs. (too low)



Ken



----- Original Message -----

From: Tom Jones III

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 12:45 AM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations





I have read all the other posts here, and all worry about a tank rupture.

While it is a possibility, I have been using compressors in my modeling for

years, but more importantly, I use them daily in my construction business.

Some of the subs come out who have never drained the tank except when the

poor thing was completely full of water, and I have never seen one rupture

or rust through. So, IMHO, while it is a good idea, draining the tank down

is really kinda unnecessary in the service you will be giving a compressor

pumping up an airbrush. Draining away the water is important, and should be

done at the least daily, but I personally do not worry about completely

draining down the tank.



If you want an inexpensive source of air, consider using a spare tire or

innertube! Paasche and others make Schrader valve adapters that permit you

to attach your airbrush to a valve stem. You can generally get several hours

of continuous spraying out of a tire before you have to go get it aired up

at the corner filling station.



Tom



----- Original Message -----

From: "Victor Bitleris" bitlerisvj@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2004 4:04 PM

Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations





>

> Hi all,

> Since the airbrushing thread got started, I have a comment, and a question

> on compressors. I bought a $99 Campbell Hausfield compressor at Wal Mart

> and have been very satisfied. It is a 2 gal. tank, goes up to 120 or so

PSI

> and it is really pretty quiet. You can talk when it runs and hear the TV

> pretty well also. In a 1 hour spraying session, it only kicks on twice.

I

> do have a question for old-timers that have used compressors for years.

> Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month

or

> less) or should I let it stay filled up. I have heard that if you keep

it

> filled, it will wear out the pump or seals or something?

>

> Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris

>

> >From: "Carol & Jerry Jankura"

> jerry.jankura@...>

> >Reply-To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> >To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> >Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> >Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:24:28 -0400

> >

> >

> >I'd suggest that you join the modelairbrush yahoo mailing list and

post

> your

> >question there, as well. The choice between "single action"

or

> "double

> >action" brush as been discussed and there are valid opinions as

to

> which of

> >the two is better, especially for someone first starting out.

> >

> >My brush is a single action paasche brush (F series); it works for the

> tasks

> >I've asked it to perform and is a reliable unit. But, I wouldn't

> consider

> >myself knowledgeable enough recommend between the two types.

> >

> >One question that you didn't ask about was compressors - I'd suggest

> that

> >you purchase something from Sears, HD, Lowes, or Menards that has a

> small

> >air tank. This'll set you back around $120, but will be usable for

> >airbrushing, as well as some general purpose shop tasks such as

running

> a

> >small brad nailer. Just be sure that you get something with a pressure

> gauge

> >and adjustment and a moisture trap.

> >

> >-- Jerry

> >

> >

> > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really bewildered

> by

> > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for any

> > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience --

good

> and bad.

> > >

> > > Thanks,

> > >

> > > Barry

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>

>

>





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ADVERTISEMENT











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----------------------------

#944 Oct 21, 2004

A typical configuration would be:



Air compressor with regulator/gauge to set the tank pressure. Air line to

your work area terminating in a moisture trap/pressure regulator. This is where

the airbrush is to be connected.



Like others have mentioned, I use quick connects (available at paint and

hardware depts./stores) between the line and the regulator at my spray booth.

This allows for putting away the air line when I'm not using it.



Keevan



----------------------------

#945 Oct 21, 2004

Like others have mentioned, I use quick connects (available at paint and

> hardware depts./stores) between the line and the regulator at my

> spray booth.

> This allows for putting away the air line when I'm not using it.



Does anyone use one of those miniature quick disconnects placed between the

airbrush and the supply line? If so, is it worth the trouble?



Thanks,



-- Jerry



----------------------------

#946 Oct 21, 2004

I would also recommend buying an air dryer in addition to a moisture trap

especially when using lacquers. Grainger's sells a desiccant type moisture

trap for about 40 bucks that will keep all the moisture out of your paint.

When the crystals start turning pink you can remove the desiccant and bake

the crystals in an oven at low temp for a few minutes to recharge them. I do

it two or three times a year.



Rick



-----Original Message-----

From: Ken [mailto:boomer17@...]

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 7:48 AM

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations





Trouble with that is there is no pressure regulation. You will gradually go

from say 40 lbs. (too high) to 5 lbs. (too low)



Ken



----- Original Message -----

From: Tom Jones III

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 12:45 AM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations





I have read all the other posts here, and all worry about a tank rupture.

While it is a possibility, I have been using compressors in my modeling

for

years, but more importantly, I use them daily in my construction business.

Some of the subs come out who have never drained the tank except when the

poor thing was completely full of water, and I have never seen one rupture

or rust through. So, IMHO, while it is a good idea, draining the tank down

is really kinda unnecessary in the service you will be giving a compressor

pumping up an airbrush. Draining away the water is important, and should

be

done at the least daily, but I personally do not worry about completely

draining down the tank.



If you want an inexpensive source of air, consider using a spare tire or

innertube! Paasche and others make Schrader valve adapters that permit you

to attach your airbrush to a valve stem. You can generally get several

hours

of continuous spraying out of a tire before you have to go get it aired up

at the corner filling station.



Tom



----- Original Message -----

From: "Victor Bitleris" bitlerisvj@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Wednesday, October 20, 2004 4:04 PM

Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations





>

> Hi all,

> Since the airbrushing thread got started, I have a comment, and a

question

> on compressors. I bought a $99 Campbell Hausfield compressor at Wal

Mart

> and have been very satisfied. It is a 2 gal. tank, goes up to 120 or so

PSI

> and it is really pretty quiet. You can talk when it runs and hear the

TV

> pretty well also. In a 1 hour spraying session, it only kicks on twice.

I

> do have a question for old-timers that have used compressors for years.

> Should I leak it down and keep it empty between uses (about once a month

or

> less) or should I let it stay filled up. I have heard that if you keep

it

> filled, it will wear out the pump or seals or something?

>

> Thanks and regards, Vic Bitleris

>

> >From: "Carol & Jerry Jankura"

> jerry.jankura@...>

> >Reply-To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> >To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> >Subject: RE: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> >Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 15:24:28 -0400

> >

> >

> >I'd suggest that you join the modelairbrush yahoo mailing list and

post

> your

> >question there, as well. The choice between "single

action"

or

> "double

> >action" brush as been discussed and there are valid opinions as

to

> which of

> >the two is better, especially for someone first starting out.

> >

> >My brush is a single action paasche brush (F series); it works for

the

> tasks

> >I've asked it to perform and is a reliable unit. But, I wouldn't

> consider

> >myself knowledgeable enough recommend between the two types.

> >

> >One question that you didn't ask about was compressors - I'd suggest

> that

> >you purchase something from Sears, HD, Lowes, or Menards that has a

> small

> >air tank. This'll set you back around $120, but will be usable for

> >airbrushing, as well as some general purpose shop tasks such as

running

> a

> >small brad nailer. Just be sure that you get something with a

pressure

> gauge

> >and adjustment and a moisture trap.

> >

> >-- Jerry

> >

> >

> > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really

bewildered

> by

> > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for

any

> > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience --

good

> and bad.

> > >

> > > Thanks,

> > >

> > > Barry

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>

>

>





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ADVERTISEMENT











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a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:

groups.yahoo.com/group/weathering/



b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:

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c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











Yahoo! Groups Links







----------------------------

#947 Oct 21, 2004

Jerry asks -

Does anyone use one of those miniature quick disconnects placed between the

airbrush and the supply line? If so, is it worth the trouble?

I guess I didn't mention that the quick connects I have are the small ones.

And the only reason my quick-connects are next to the compressor is I don't

have a permanent workspace for the air brush. Whichever size you use, or

where you place them, doesn't matter so much as the ease of getting

out/putting away the stuff.

Bert



----------------------------

#950 Oct 21, 2004

Bert,

Where did you purchase you mini (small) quick connects? I know Harbor

Freight sells a hose and quick connects for one brush but I'd like to

find more of the parts for the brushes so I wouldn't have to buy another

"kit". I don't use them currently but it would be nice. Thanx. Rob



snip> > I guess I didn't mention that the quick connects I have are the

> small ones.

> And the only reason my quick-connects are next to the compressor is

> I don't

> have a permanent workspace for the air brush. Whichever size you

> use, or

> where you place them, doesn't matter so much as the ease of getting

> out/putting away the stuff.

> Bert



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----------------------------

#954 Oct 21, 2004

When faced with this source of air (which I from time to time have faced

when doing custom airbrushing on motorcycles and helmets), I simply use an

overinflated tire (holds more pressure than an innertube) and a small valve

inline with the airbrush. I shut the valve way down, and adjust it as my

pressure changes. Most of the time I am not as concerned with the actual

pressure as I am in getting the paint to flow on to the surface being

painted in a nice, smooth, pebble-free coating. High pressure leads to

pebbling and blow-out, low pressure leads to big blobs of paint dorking out

of the gun and in a stream of poo. I rarely, if ever, actually check my

pressure, I just adjust the gun with the little valve and go on. Considering

how little time you actually paint most models, this is not a big deal to

me, especially when compared to the time spent on flaming a helmet or

painting "Born to Be Wild" for the 10,000th time on an individualists

motorcycle. In most cases, I should actually paint "Born to Audit" instead!



Tom

----- Original Message -----

From: "Ken" boomer17@...>

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 7:43 AM

Subject: Re: [weathering] Re: Airbrush Recommendations





>

> How do you regulate the pressure? I tried that approach and the small

regulator that I bought at Home Depot did not do the job>

>

> Ken

>

>

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: wmckenney

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 12:18 AM

> Subject: [weathering] Re: Airbrush Recommendations

>

>

>

> I agree with Jerry's recommendation. I'm new to airbrushing but am

> getting good results with an Anthem 155. I use acrylics only

> (Badger's Modelflex or artist quality medium viscosity paints)

>

> For an air supply, I went to an auto supply store and bought a tank

> that I fill at the local gas station - free air and quiet operation.

> One fill-up lasts me one or two evenings. This is a low cost

> solution; I'll probably get a compressor later.

>

> HTH Bill

>

> --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry & Karen Bengtson"

> jkbengtson@c...> wrote:

> > Hello Barry,

> >

> > I used several types of airbrushes throughout the years. By far

> the best

> > I've used for Model Railroading is the Badger 155 or 360. See

> sites below.

> > They are the same airbrush but the 360 model allows you to spray

> small

> > amounts of paint without a bottle.

> >

> >

> www.dixieart.com/Badger_155_Anthem_General_Purpose_Airbrush.ht

> ml

> > www.dixieart.com/Badger_360_Universal_Swivel_Airbrush.html

> >

> > I also recommend buying a air compressor that has a tank from

> Sears, Home

> > Depot, Harbor Freight, etc. Be sure to use a water trap even in dry

> > climates.

> > One other option to supply the air is a 5 lb. C02 tank from a

> welding shop

> > which is what I use.

> >

> > A double action airbrush takes a little longer to get used to but

> you will

> > not regret the purchase. I teach people to airbrush using my 155

> and it only

> > takes them a couple of minutes to get used to using it.

> >

> > Good luck,

> >

> > Jerry

> >

> > >

> > > ----- Original Message -----

> > > From: "Barry_Roth" barry_roth@y...>

> > > To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> > > Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 11:59 PM

> > > Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> > >

> > >

> > > >

> > > >

> > > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really

> bewildered by

> > > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful for

> any

> > > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience --

> good and

> > bad.

> > > >

> > > > Thanks,

> > > >

> > > > Barry

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

> ADVERTISEMENT

>

>

>

>

>

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> weathering-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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> c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of

Service.

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>

>

>







----------------------------

#955 Oct 21, 2004

Dixieart sell the miniature dis-connects. And in response to a previous

question, definitely worth it if you are using more then one air brush at a

time, or having to clean up as you only need to take the airbrush.







Regards Bill







_____



From: Robert K Nielsen [mailto:the_hobo@...]

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 9:05 AM

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations







Bert,

Where did you purchase you mini (small) quick connects? I know Harbor

Freight sells a hose and quick connects for one brush but I'd like to

find more of the parts for the brushes so I wouldn't have to buy another

"kit". I don't use them currently but it would be nice. Thanx. Rob



snip> > I guess I didn't mention that the quick connects I have are the

> small ones.

> And the only reason my quick-connects are next to the compressor is

> I don't

> have a permanent workspace for the air brush. Whichever size you

> use, or

> where you place them, doesn't matter so much as the ease of getting

> out/putting away the stuff.

> Bert



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----------------------------

#956 Oct 21, 2004

Robert asks -

Where did you purchase you mini (small) quick connects? I know Harbor

Freight sells a hose and quick connects for one brush but I'd like to

find more of the parts for the brushes so I wouldn't have to buy another

"kit". I don't use them currently but it would be nice.

Well, actually, I got them from a garage that was closing down. At the time

I was a mechanic (I got wiser as I got older) and worked next-door to the

place. Got many air tools (subsequently stolen!) and a bunch of air-hose

equipment.

But I have seen them at Harbor Freight Toy Store (or is that Tools?). I

don't' pay attention to them, so I couldn't give a price range.

Bert



----------------------------

#957 Oct 21, 2004

At 08:43 AM 10/21/2004 -0400, you wrote:

>How do you regulate the pressure? I tried that approach and the small

>regulator that I bought at Home Depot did not do the job>

>

>Ken



Ken,

I have a 2 HP, 12 Gallon compressor that I bought from Sears that I

purchased new

from Sears for about $200.00.

The compressor came with a pressure regulator. With that regulator I can

regulate the hose pressure from 5 psi to 125 psi.

I usually keep that pressure at about 40 psi.

Then I have a hobby regulator hooked into that so I can really fine tune

the pressure, depending on the paint I'm using at the time.

This setup works very well.

I don't know what compressor you have but you should be able to set yours

up the same way.

Clark Womack



----------------------------

#960 Oct 21, 2004

This thread has moved on to other interesting and related topics, but I want to

thank all the listmembers who responded to my initial question. This will give

me a much firmer perch to work from.



Barry









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----------------------------

#962 Oct 21, 2004

I tried various auto and home suppliers but couldn't fine a suitable

regulator. So I went to a industrial suppler (pipelines etc.) and

found a nice regulator made by Watts Fluidair Inc. in Kittery,

Maine 03904-0902. The model number is R384-028; has a range of 0 to

60PSI and a good knob so I have fine control of the pressure out.



So I have`two dials. The first I bought with the tank has a range of

0 to 160 psi and measures the psi in the tank. The`second is part of

the regulator controlling the outflow (as above).



The whole setup cost about $40US and meets my needs (I don't do a

lot of airbrushing and wanted something quiet). Others have used an

autotire instead of an airtank. I prefer an airtank as it is smaller

and comes with a handle. Mine holds 7 gal (US or Imperial?) and has

a max. pressure of 125psi.



HTH Bill

--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Ken" boomer17@a...> wrote:

> How do you regulate the pressure? I tried that approach and the

small regulator that I bought at Home Depot did not do the job>

>

> Ken

>

>

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: wmckenney

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 12:18 AM

> Subject: [weathering] Re: Airbrush Recommendations

>

>

>

> I agree with Jerry's recommendation. I'm new to airbrushing but

am

> getting good results with an Anthem 155. I use acrylics only

> (Badger's Modelflex or artist quality medium viscosity paints)

>

> For an air supply, I went to an auto supply store and bought a

tank

> that I fill at the local gas station - free air and quiet

operation.

> One fill-up lasts me one or two evenings. This is a low cost

> solution; I'll probably get a compressor later.

>

> HTH Bill

>

> --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry & Karen Bengtson"

> jkbengtson@c...> wrote:

> > Hello Barry,

> >

> > I used several types of airbrushes throughout the years. By

far

> the best

> > I've used for Model Railroading is the Badger 155 or 360. See

> sites below.

> > They are the same airbrush but the 360 model allows you to

spray

> small

> > amounts of paint without a bottle.

> >

> >

>

www.dixieart.com/Badger_155_Anthem_General_Purpose_Airbrush.ht

> ml

> >

www.dixieart.com/Badger_360_Universal_Swivel_Airbrush.html

> >

> > I also recommend buying a air compressor that has a tank from

> Sears, Home

> > Depot, Harbor Freight, etc. Be sure to use a water trap even

in dry

> > climates.

> > One other option to supply the air is a 5 lb. C02 tank from a

> welding shop

> > which is what I use.

> >

> > A double action airbrush takes a little longer to get used to

but

> you will

> > not regret the purchase. I teach people to airbrush using my

155

> and it only

> > takes them a couple of minutes to get used to using it.

> >

> > Good luck,

> >

> > Jerry

> >

> > >

> > > ----- Original Message -----

> > > From: "Barry_Roth" barry_roth@y...>

> > > To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> > > Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 11:59 PM

> > > Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> > >

> > >

> > > >

> > > >

> > > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really

> bewildered by

> > > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful

for

> any

> > > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -

-

> good and

> > bad.

> > > >

> > > > Thanks,

> > > >

> > > > Barry

>

>

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

> ADVERTISEMENT

>

>

>

>

>

---------------

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> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

> a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:

> groups.yahoo.com/group/weathering/

>

> b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:

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>

> c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms

of Service.

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#964 Oct 21, 2004

Hi, Clark:

> I usually keep that pressure at about 40 psi.

> Then I have a hobby regulator hooked into that so I can really fine tune

> the pressure, depending on the paint I'm using at the time.

> This setup works very well.



What is the difference between the regulator that comes on the compressor

and what you call a "hobby regulator?"



Thanks,



-- Jerry



----------------------------

#965 Oct 21, 2004

Hi, Robert:



> Where did you purchase you mini (small) quick connects? I know Harbor

> Freight sells a hose and quick connects for one brush but I'd like to

> find more of the parts for the brushes so I wouldn't have to buy another

> "kit". I don't use them currently but it would be nice. Thanx. Rob



Be aware that the Harbor Freight hoses do not fit all of the air brushes on

the market. I bought one and tried it with my Paasche brushes. It was a

no-go situation; the fitting was too large a diameter to fit the Paasche.

Fortunately, HF had no problem buying it back from me.



-- Jerry



----------------------------

#966 Oct 22, 2004

Bill,



Thanks for the info. I plan to file it away for future reference.



Ken





----- Original Message -----

From: wmckenney

To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 8:08 PM

Subject: [weathering] Re: Airbrush Recommendations







I tried various auto and home suppliers but couldn't fine a suitable

regulator. So I went to a industrial suppler (pipelines etc.) and

found a nice regulator made by Watts Fluidair Inc. in Kittery,

Maine 03904-0902. The model number is R384-028; has a range of 0 to

60PSI and a good knob so I have fine control of the pressure out.



So I have`two dials. The first I bought with the tank has a range of

0 to 160 psi and measures the psi in the tank. The`second is part of

the regulator controlling the outflow (as above).



The whole setup cost about $40US and meets my needs (I don't do a

lot of airbrushing and wanted something quiet). Others have used an

autotire instead of an airtank. I prefer an airtank as it is smaller

and comes with a handle. Mine holds 7 gal (US or Imperial?) and has

a max. pressure of 125psi.



HTH Bill



--- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Ken" boomer17@a...> wrote:

> How do you regulate the pressure? I tried that approach and the

small regulator that I bought at Home Depot did not do the job>

>

> Ken

>

>

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: wmckenney

> To: weathering@yahoogroups.com

> Sent: Thursday, October 21, 2004 12:18 AM

> Subject: [weathering] Re: Airbrush Recommendations

>

>

>

> I agree with Jerry's recommendation. I'm new to airbrushing but

am

> getting good results with an Anthem 155. I use acrylics only

> (Badger's Modelflex or artist quality medium viscosity paints)

>

> For an air supply, I went to an auto supply store and bought a

tank

> that I fill at the local gas station - free air and quiet

operation.

> One fill-up lasts me one or two evenings. This is a low cost

> solution; I'll probably get a compressor later.

>

> HTH Bill

>

> --- In weathering@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry & Karen Bengtson"

> jkbengtson@c...> wrote:

> > Hello Barry,

> >

> > I used several types of airbrushes throughout the years. By

far

> the best

> > I've used for Model Railroading is the Badger 155 or 360. See

> sites below.

> > They are the same airbrush but the 360 model allows you to

spray

> small

> > amounts of paint without a bottle.

> >

> >

>

www.dixieart.com/Badger_155_Anthem_General_Purpose_Airbrush.ht

> ml

> >

www.dixieart.com/Badger_360_Universal_Swivel_Airbrush.html

> >

> > I also recommend buying a air compressor that has a tank from

> Sears, Home

> > Depot, Harbor Freight, etc. Be sure to use a water trap even

in dry

> > climates.

> > One other option to supply the air is a 5 lb. C02 tank from a

> welding shop

> > which is what I use.

> >

> > A double action airbrush takes a little longer to get used to

but

> you will

> > not regret the purchase. I teach people to airbrush using my

155

> and it only

> > takes them a couple of minutes to get used to using it.

> >

> > Good luck,

> >

> > Jerry

> >

> > >

> > > ----- Original Message -----

> > > From: "Barry_Roth" barry_roth@y...>

> > > To: weathering@yahoogroups.com>

> > > Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 11:59 PM

> > > Subject: [weathering] Airbrush recommendations

> > >

> > >

> > > >

> > > >

> > > > I want to buy an airbrush for modeling but I'm really

> bewildered by

> > > > the number of kinds available. I would be most grateful

for

> any

> > > > recommendations by list members, or reports of experience -

-

> good and

> > bad.

> > > >

> > > > Thanks,

> > > >

> > > > Barry

>

>

>

>

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