VintageBigBlue.org

 

Re: [TV_Antennas] Re: TV stations about 115 miles away


Nov 10, 2012

 


----------------------------

#591 Nov 10, 2012

Nov. 10, 2012



Hello all,

I am interested in opinions if I might be able to receive TV stations that are about 115 miles away from me (as the crow flies).



If I purchase the Winegard 8200 & use RG6 cable my hope is to be able to receive groundwave TV signals from Philadephia, PA.



The philly TV real frequencies range from channel HI-VHF to UHF.



To my knowledge I have almost no obstacles , no trees, no mountains, no buildings. It is wide-opened space.



My current TV antenna set-up does not receive these TV stations in groundwave mode.



But, I do receive many of these Philly TV stations in DX mode.



I have a flat panel Channel Master 4228 (previous generation),CM preamp (7777), & RG6 cable.



The farthest groundwave TV station that I currently receive is about 30 miles away.



There is one TV station (WNVT) about 50 miles away, but I cannot receive it's groundwave signal.(but maybe that is because another TV station's real frequence is also Channel 24).



Your thoughts please.

Thank you,

mike



----------------------------

#592 Nov 10, 2012

Not sure, but in cases like this I think an important factor is "how high"

up you can get your antenna. That plus some amplification. We'll see what

others have to say.



Rob

On Sat, Nov 10, 2012 at 11:07 AM, John antennagarden@...> wrote:



> **

>

>

> Nov. 10, 2012

>

> Hello all,

> I am interested in opinions if I might be able to receive TV stations that

> are about 115 miles away from me (as the crow flies).

>

> If I purchase the Winegard 8200 & use RG6 cable my hope is to be able to

> receive groundwave TV signals from Philadephia, PA.

>

> The philly TV real frequencies range from channel HI-VHF to UHF.

>

> To my knowledge I have almost no obstacles , no trees, no mountains, no

> buildings. It is wide-opened space.

>

> My current TV antenna set-up does not receive these TV stations in

> groundwave mode.

>

> But, I do receive many of these Philly TV stations in DX mode.

>

> I have a flat panel Channel Master 4228 (previous generation),CM preamp

> (7777), & RG6 cable.

>

> The farthest groundwave TV station that I currently receive is about 30

> miles away.

>

> There is one TV station (WNVT) about 50 miles away, but I cannot receive

> it's groundwave signal.(but maybe that is because another TV station's real

> frequence is also Channel 24).

>

> Your thoughts please.

> Thank you,

> mike

>

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#593 Nov 10, 2012

Where, generally, is your location? 115 miles is not out of the question, but you will need to get an understanding of the RF environment where you are. I take it you are in or near Virginia, but a more specific area would be needed to really help.

--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, "John" antennagarden@...> wrote:

>

> Nov. 10, 2012

>

> Hello all,

> I am interested in opinions if I might be able to receive TV stations that are about 115 miles away from me (as the crow flies).

>

> If I purchase the Winegard 8200 & use RG6 cable my hope is to be able to receive groundwave TV signals from Philadephia, PA.

>

> The philly TV real frequencies range from channel HI-VHF to UHF.

>

> To my knowledge I have almost no obstacles , no trees, no mountains, no buildings. It is wide-opened space.

>

> My current TV antenna set-up does not receive these TV stations in groundwave mode.

>

> But, I do receive many of these Philly TV stations in DX mode.

>

> I have a flat panel Channel Master 4228 (previous generation),CM preamp (7777), & RG6 cable.

>

> The farthest groundwave TV station that I currently receive is about 30 miles away.

>

> There is one TV station (WNVT) about 50 miles away, but I cannot receive it's groundwave signal.(but maybe that is because another TV station's real frequence is also Channel 24).

>

> Your thoughts please.

> Thank you,

> mike

>



----------------------------

#594 Nov 10, 2012

On 11/10/2012 12:07 PM, John wrote: > Nov. 10, 2012

>

> Hello all,

> I am interested in opinions if I might be able to receive TV stations that are about 115 miles away from me (as the crow flies).

>

> If I purchase the Winegard 8200 & use RG6 cable my hope is to be able to receive groundwave TV signals from Philadephia, PA.

>

> The philly TV real frequencies range from channel HI-VHF to UHF.

>

> To my knowledge I have almost no obstacles , no trees, no mountains, no buildings. It is wide-opened space.

>

> My current TV antenna set-up does not receive these TV stations in groundwave mode.

>

> But, I do receive many of these Philly TV stations in DX mode.

>

> I have a flat panel Channel Master 4228 (previous generation),CM preamp (7777), & RG6 cable.

>

> The farthest groundwave TV station that I currently receive is about 30 miles away.

>

> There is one TV station (WNVT) about 50 miles away, but I cannot receive it's groundwave signal.(but maybe that is because another TV station's real frequence is also Channel 24).

>

> Your thoughts please.

> Thank you,

> mike

>





Your pre-amp is a very noisy pre-amp.

You would be wise to find a better pre-amp.

Your not showing a Hi-VHF antenna in your set-up, you will need an

antenna that is geared toward Hi-VHF to recieve stations much farther

than you are.

You also could raise your antenna higher.





--

All the Best & 73's

Dale Miller, KC2CBD

Tennessee

Ham Operator since 1997

Member of YahooPipesmokers and ASP since February 2005



Registered Linux User: #317401

Linux since June 2003

Registered Ubuntu User #26423



stpatrick3spam@...

stpatrick2spam@...

stpatrick3spam@...

bdchimneysweepspam@...



(cut the spam to reply)





VOTE TO REBUILD!

www.twintowersalliance.com

__







----------------------------

#595 Nov 10, 2012

At 115mi that is going to be difficult, if not impossible for 24/7 reception of DTV. Now granted tropo enhancement will be common tha that distance but there are several factors to consider.



***Does the target station in Philly operate on a native RF channel that is also used by a closer station?



***How much power and antenna height does the target station operate?



***Were you desiring daytime reception of TV (mid day to mid afternoon) typically when tropo enhancement is less common?



I live 70mi from the Little Rock (AR) main antenna farm, and also am located within distance (65mi) for part of another market (the El Dorado AR half of the Monroe LA/El Dorado AR market). There are the stations in the Greenwood MS/Greenville MS market that I can get on ocassion, but not all. My most relible reception from the "Mississippi Delta" is WMAO 25 (23-`, 23-2, 23-3), the MPB/PBS relayer. ABC/FOX affiliate WABG 32 (6-1, 6-2) has not been received in my location (except for intense tropo, and then for short periods) because of my "local" NBC station, KARK 32 (4-1) Little Rock.



The 4228 is a great antenna for UHF, but will work for close in high-VHF, I use it and a Winegard VHF-hi yagi (10 element) for both "local TV" and DXing. The CM 7777 preamp is used in my system but I only us RG6 coax at present. For such an undertaking, you might want to install a large tower, run RG11 coax (or hardline), and perhaps invest in a commercial-grade preamp and/or antenna system). Such will cost several hundred dollars in total and there would be no guarantee that you would lock signals from Philly 24/7.



I don't mean to be a Debbie Downer, but I've been DXing TV in my location since 2005 and have some knowledge of what will and won't work. If you are not seeing *any* signal on your meter (even it its not decoding), then its unlikely you will be able to catch your target station with some improvement.



Fritze



----------------------------

#596 Nov 10, 2012

Hello

.

Right now I receive 50 TV channels everyday.

.

My goal now is to try to receive TV stations that are not part of my

Designated Market Area (DMA). Philadephia which is about 115 miles away.

.

In the last 5 years of my research that I did on internet forums (simular to this forum),

almost all of the professionals & serious hobbist has bragged on the

Channel Master pre-amp 7777. I respected & went along with their professional opinions.

I totally ignored the companies' exaggerations.

.

My Channel Master 4228 (previous generation) is only a lack luster HI-VHF performer,

but it does a fantastic job of picking up the close HI-VHF stations.

I.easily receive the real TV channels of 7, 9, 11, 13 which are all about 20 to 25 miles away.

.

My TV antenna is about 30 feet high. It is not realistic to make it any higher in this community..

.

Can an antenna like Winegard 8200 typically receive groundwave TV stations about 115 miles away?

Thanks,

mike

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Your pre-amp is a very noisy pre-amp.

You would be wise to find a better pre-amp.

Your not showing a Hi-VHF antenna in your set-up, you will need an

antenna that is geared toward Hi-VHF to recieve stations much farther

than you are.

You also could raise your antenna higher.







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#597 Nov 10, 2012

On 11/10/2012 06:48 PM, Mike Friend wrote: > Hello

>

> Right now I receive 50 TV channels everyday.

>

> My goal now is to try to receive TV stations that are not part of my

> Designated Market Area (DMA). Philadephia which is about 115 miles away.

>

> In the last 5 years of my research that I did on internet forums (simular to this forum),

> almost all of the professionals & serious hobbist has bragged on the

> Channel Master pre-amp 7777. I respected & went along with their professional opinions.

> I totally ignored the companies' exaggerations.

For a consumer pre-amp it is a good pre-amp, but there are better

pre-amps out there with a lower noise figure.

With what your wanting to do, you would be better off going with a

Kitztech or research communications pre-amp.

www.researchcomms.com/hdtv.html

www.kitztech.com/

>

> My Channel Master 4228 (previous generation) is only a lack luster HI-VHF performer,

> but it does a fantastic job of picking up the close HI-VHF stations.

> I easily receive the real TV channels of 7, 9, 11, 13 which are all about 20 to 25 miles away.



Correct...it is a UHF antenna, and that is what it was designed to pick

up, but it will work for close Hi-VHF.

>

> My TV antenna is about 30 feet high. It is not realistic to make it any higher in this community.

>

> Can an antenna like Winegard 8200 typically receive groundwave TV stations about 115 miles away?

> Thanks,

> mike

>

There are no guarantees, but it is possible.

Of course as has been said, for regular viewing I would not guarantee that.

The market I live in there is a PBS station 13 miles east of me and the

rest of the stations are about 80 miles west.



You could consult with the crew on this forum.

www.digitalhome.ca/forum/forumdisplay.php?s=0654514ffb0f6c6a5b655c59290d9397&f=81

I've frequented the 'antenna research & development' forum when I was

working on mine set-up.

I can't really do any better till I can get my tower erected.





--

All the Best & 73's

Dale Miller, KC2CBD

Tennessee

Ham Operator since 1997

Member of YahooPipesmokers and ASP since February 2005



Registered Linux User: #317401

Linux since June 2003

Registered Ubuntu User #26423



stpatrick3spam@...

stpatrick2spam@...

stpatrick3spam@...

bdchimneysweepspam@...



(cut the spam to reply)





VOTE TO REBUILD!

www.twintowersalliance.com

__







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#598 Nov 11, 2012

--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Friend antennagarden@...> wrote: >

> Hello

> .

> Right now I receive 50 TV channels everyday.

> .

> My goal now is to try to receive TV stations that are not part of my

> Designated Market Area (DMA). Philadephia which is about 115 miles away.

> .

> In the last 5 years of my research that I did on internet forums (simular to this forum),

> almost all of the professionals & serious hobbist has bragged on the

> Channel Master pre-amp 7777. I respected & went along with their professional opinions.

> I totally ignored the companies' exaggerations.

> .

> My Channel Master 4228 (previous generation) is only a lack luster HI-VHF performer,

> but it does a fantastic job of picking up the close HI-VHF stations.

> I.easily receive the real TV channels of 7, 9, 11, 13 which are all about 20 to 25 miles away.

> .

> My TV antenna is about 30 feet high. It is not realistic to make it any higher in this community..

> .

> Can an antenna like Winegard 8200 typically receive groundwave TV stations about 115 miles away?

> Thanks,

> mike

> .

The most significant issue is whether the signals are present to be received and decoded. You are going to need to have a reason to believe they are present before going any further. It will take some effort. You might try acquiring 4 or 5 bowtie type UHF antennas and attach them to a PVC pipe or something similar. Up and down, in line, about a foot apart. You will have to cut the twin lead and splice the antennas together, being careful to tape over the splices and keep the distance between to two conductors the same all the way down. Then attach to your pre-amp with a transformer. I would assume you have the Philly stations in question in your TV's scan, or you can directly punch them up. A UHF station, as there's little hope of getting a VHF with the bowties. Get this temporary antenna up as high and as safely as you can. This will need to be between noon and dusk to assure you aren't getting a tropo bounce. Turn the bowties to where you think the stations are. If you can't see the receiver, you can jack the volume up and probably hear any reception. Patiently turn the antenna. Give the trial some time. If you get anything, I'm sure some of us can give advice on how to proceed, If you find nothing, then this project stands an excellent chance of being an expensive frustration if taken further.



----------------------------

#599 Nov 11, 2012

Curious question in this regard. What's more likely to bring in a hot

enough signal?: A) 1 antenna on a tower with good amplification, or B)

many antennas on a tower with good amplification? Do more antennas work

better? Or are they just duplicating what's already there?



Rob

On Sun, Nov 11, 2012 at 12:36 PM, jhtaylor2001 jhtaylor2001@...>wrote:



> **

>

>

>

>

> --- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Friend antennagarden@...> wrote:

> >

> > Hello

> >

> > Right now I receive 50 TV channels everyday.

> >

> > My goal now is to try to receive TV stations that are not part of my

> > Designated Market Area (DMA). Philadephia which is about 115 miles away.

> >

> > In the last 5 years of my research that I did on internet forums

> (simular to this forum),

> > almost all of the professionals & serious hobbist has bragged on the

> > Channel Master pre-amp 7777. I respected & went along with their

> professional opinions.

> > I totally ignored the companies' exaggerations.

> >

> > My Channel Master 4228 (previous generation) is only a lack luster

> HI-VHF performer,

> > but it does a fantastic job of picking up the close HI-VHF stations.

> > I easily receive the real TV channels of 7, 9, 11, 13 which are all

> about 20 to 25 miles away.

> >

> > My TV antenna is about 30 feet high. It is not realistic to make it any

> higher in this community.

> >

> > Can an antenna like Winegard 8200 typically receive groundwave TV

> stations about 115 miles away?

> > Thanks,

> > mike

> >

> The most significant issue is whether the signals are present to be

> received and decoded. You are going to need to have a reason to believe

> they are present before going any further. It will take some effort. You

> might try acquiring 4 or 5 bowtie type UHF antennas and attach them to a

> PVC pipe or something similar. Up and down, in line, about a foot apart.

> You will have to cut the twin lead and splice the antennas together, being

> careful to tape over the splices and keep the distance between to two

> conductors the same all the way down. Then attach to your pre-amp with a

> transformer. I would assume you have the Philly stations in question in

> your TV's scan, or you can directly punch them up. A UHF station, as

> there's little hope of getting a VHF with the bowties. Get this temporary

> antenna up as high and as safely as you can. This will need to be between

> noon and dusk to assure you aren't getting a tropo bounce. Turn the bowties

> to where you think the stations are. If you can't see the receiver, you can

> jack the volume up and probably hear any reception. Patiently turn the

> antenna. Give the trial some time. If you get anything, I'm sure some of us

> can give advice on how to proceed, If you find nothing, then this project

> stands an excellent chance of being an expensive frustration if taken

> further.

>

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#600 Nov 11, 2012

--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Robert Williams will7370@...> wrote: >

> Curious question in this regard. What's more likely to bring in a hot

> enough signal?: A) 1 antenna on a tower with good amplification, or B)

> many antennas on a tower with good amplification? Do more antennas work

> better? Or are they just duplicating what's already there?

>

> Rob

The science is too new to be really firm. UHF signals tend to refract, or bend, to varying degrees. A signal might be fine at one antenna height, and gone 2 feet above or below. Stacking folded dipoles as I suggested helps "find" a signal. There would probably be no good reason to stack antennas if there was a true "line of sight". Most viewers are not going to see any transmitters. There is some literature on this, classically involving UHF signal movement through trees. My own experience has me believing I will more likely find a UHF signal if my antenna receives from multiple heights. Some have motorized their mast to go up and down.



----------------------------

#601 Nov 14, 2012

Hello,

I like & learned a valuble.aspect that you said.!

.

You said the following :

The most significant issue is whether the signals are present to be received and decoded. You are going to need to have a reason to believe they are present before going any further.

1. Groundwave mode, not DX mode, Yes, the real channel 8 & channel 12 & channel 30 all.have a signal strength of about 20 %. Not strong enough to lock onto a picture..(these might not be Philly TV stations).

I feel that a new Winegard 8200 could bring in HI-VHF better than my

Channel Master 4228, but, when it comes to UHF channels, I am sensing that my Channel Masterr 4228 might out perform the Winegard 8200.

What is your thought?...

.



2. I really like the thought of jacking up the sound, to be up on the roof & hearing the signal.

.

3. You gave a good explaination.on a home build antenna , but my pea brain can't make sense of it. Might it just be simular performance as my Channel Master 4228?

.

Thanks,

mike

.

.. --- On Sun, 11/11/12, jhtaylor2001 jhtaylor2001@...> wrote:





From: jhtaylor2001 jhtaylor2001@...>

Subject: [TV_Antennas] Re: TV stations about 115 miles away

To: TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com

Date: Sunday, November 11, 2012, 7:36 PM







.











--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Friend antennagarden@...> wrote:

>

> Hello

> .

> Right now I receive 50 TV channels everyday.

> .

> My goal now is to try to receive TV stations that are not part of my

> Designated Market Area (DMA). Philadephia which is about 115 miles away.

> .

> In the last 5 years of my research that I did on internet forums (simular to this forum),

> almost all of the professionals & serious hobbist has bragged on the

> Channel Master pre-amp 7777. I respected & went along with their professional opinions.

> I totally ignored the companies' exaggerations.

> .

> My Channel Master 4228 (previous generation) is only a lack luster HI-VHF performer,

> but it does a fantastic job of picking up the close HI-VHF stations.

> I.easily receive the real TV channels of 7, 9, 11, 13 which are all about 20 to 25 miles away.

> .

> My TV antenna is about 30 feet high. It is not realistic to make it any higher in this community..

> .

> Can an antenna like Winegard 8200 typically receive groundwave TV stations about 115 miles away?

> Thanks,

> mike

> .

The most significant issue is whether the signals are present to be received and decoded. You are going to need to have a reason to believe they are present before going any further. It will take some effort. You might try acquiring 4 or 5 bowtie type UHF antennas and attach them to a PVC pipe or something similar. Up and down, in line, about a foot apart. You will have to cut the twin lead and splice the antennas together, being careful to tape over the splices and keep the distance between to two conductors the same all the way down. Then attach to your pre-amp with a transformer. I would assume you have the Philly stations in question in your TV's scan, or you can directly punch them up. A UHF station, as there's little hope of getting a VHF with the bowties. Get this temporary antenna up as high and as safely as you can. This will need to be between noon and dusk to assure you aren't getting a tropo bounce. Turn the bowties to where you think the

stations are. If you can't see the receiver, you can jack the volume up and probably hear any reception. Patiently turn the antenna. Give the trial some time. If you get anything, I'm sure some of us can give advice on how to proceed, If you find nothing, then this project stands an excellent chance of being an expensive frustration if taken further.

















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#602 Nov 14, 2012

Hello,

I agree.

Sometimes you can just put a antenna up & it is in its best case senerio.

Or sometimes you can do Chinese math & it still will not work for you.



My five years as a TV reception hobbist, has taught me that Signal capture is less of a science & more of an art



People try to advise me to raise up my TV antenna,

but when I do that I immediately LOSE TV channels because I am useing a roof & a mountain to receive some of my TV stations.



Thank you,

mike





--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, "jhtaylor2001" jhtaylor2001@...> wrote:

>

>

>

> --- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Robert Williams will7370@> wrote:

> >

> > Curious question in this regard. What's more likely to bring in a hot

> > enough signal?: A) 1 antenna on a tower with good amplification, or B)

> > many antennas on a tower with good amplification? Do more antennas work

> > better? Or are they just duplicating what's already there?

> >

> > Rob

> The science is too new to be really firm. UHF signals tend to refract, or bend, to varying degrees. A signal might be fine at one antenna height, and gone 2 feet above or below. Stacking folded dipoles as I suggested helps "find" a signal. There would probably be no good reason to stack antennas if there was a true "line of sight". Most viewers are not going to see any transmitters. There is some literature on this, classically involving UHF signal movement through trees. My own experience has me believing I will more likely find a UHF signal if my antenna receives from multiple heights. Some have motorized their mast to go up and down.

>







----------------------------

#603 Nov 14, 2012

To use a bounced signal

.

Hello,

I agree.

Sometimes you can just put a antenna up & it is in its best case senerio.

Or sometimes you can do Chinese math & it still will not work for you.



My five years as a TV reception hobbist, has taught me that Signal capture is less of a science & more of an art



People try to advise me to raise up my TV antenna,

but when I do that I immediately LOSE TV channels because I am useing a roof & a mountain to receive some of my TV stations.



Thank you,

mike





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#605 Nov 14, 2012

On 11/14/2012 05:40 PM, Mike Friend wrote: > Hello,

> I like & learned a valuble aspect that you said !

>

> You said the following :

> The most significant issue is whether the signals are present to be received and decoded. You are going to need to have a reason to believe they are present before going any further.

> 1. Groundwave mode, not DX mode, Yes, the real channel 8 & channel 12 & channel 30 all have a signal strength of about 20 %. Not strong enough to lock onto a picture. (these might not be Philly TV stations).

> I feel that a new Winegard 8200 could bring in HI-VHF better than my

> Channel Master 4228, but, when it comes to UHF channels, I am sensing that my Channel Masterr 4228 might out perform the Winegard 8200.

> What is your thought?

>

>

> 2. I really like the thought of jacking up the sound, to be up on the roof & hearing the signal.

>

> 3. You gave a good explaination on a home build antenna , but my pea brain can't make sense of it. Might it just be simular performance as my Channel Master 4228?

>

> Thanks,

> mike

>

>



I personally think you would be better off finding a decent Hi-VHF only

antenna and combining with a UVSJ into your pre-amp. My system works

much better with a converted channel master antenna that use to be a

UHF/VHF antenna similar to the Winegard 8200 and a home built UHF antenna.

What I did is remove the UHF portion from the old CM-3672 and changed

the directors to old Channel Master winged elements.

My signal stays much more stable with the present set-up then it did

with the 3672 before conversion.



The 4228 is a very good UHF antenna IMHO.



--

All the Best & 73's

Dale Miller, KC2CBD

Tennessee

Ham Operator since 1997

Member of YahooPipesmokers and ASP since February 2005



Registered Linux User: #317401

Linux since June 2003

Registered Ubuntu User #26423



stpatrick3spam@...

stpatrick2spam@...

stpatrick3spam@...

bdchimneysweepspam@...



(cut the spam to reply)





VOTE TO REBUILD!

www.twintowersalliance.com

__



----------------------------

#608 Nov 15, 2012

--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Mike Friend antennagarden@...> wrote: >

> Hello,

> I like & learned a valuble..aspect that you said..!

> ..

> You said the following :

> The most significant issue is whether the signals are present to be received and decoded. You are going to need to have a reason to believe they are present before going any further.

> 1. Groundwave mode, not DX mode, Yes, the real channel 8 & channel 12 & channel 30 all..have a signal strength of about 20 %. Not strong enough to lock onto a picture...(these might not be Philly TV stations).

They so not seem to be Philadelphia stations.



> I feel that a new Winegard 8200 could bring in HI-VHF better than my

> Channel Master 4228, but, when it comes to UHF channels, I am sensing that my Channel Masterr 4228 might out perform the Winegard 8200.

> What is your thought?......

I can't say, but could guess it would. >

> 2. I really like the thought of jacking up the sound, to be up on the roof & hearing the signal.

> ..

> 3. You gave a good explaination..on a home build antenna , but my pea brain can't make sense of it. Might it just be simular performance as my Channel Master 4228?

>

Yep, the 4228 will do what I intended, more or less.



There is only one VHF station licensed to Philadelphia, but several others in its market. With the issues involving VHF, I wouldn't worry with the 8200 until there was some UHF reception confirmed. When I commence a project, failure will be an option. If you cannot accept failure, don't begin. The farthest steady signal I receive is from 85 miles. But in that case, there probably couldn't be better conditions for reception. There are stations 15-20 miles farther away I don't think I have any hope for. Too many issues with co-channel and adjacent channel interference and terrain problems.



----------------------------

#613 Nov 15, 2012

It is an art like sailing....dependent of the weather and equipment quality.

.

Bill

.

If society's rules were law, I'd be on Death Row.





---------------

> From: John antennagarden@...>

>To: TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com

>Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 5:58 PM

>Subject: [TV_Antennas] Re: TV stations about 115 miles away

>

>Hello,

>I agree.

>Sometimes you can just put a antenna up & it is in its best case senerio.

>Or sometimes you can do Chinese math & it still will not work for you.

>

>My five years as a TV reception hobbist, has taught me that Signal capture is less of a science & more of an art

>

>People try to advise me to raise up my TV antenna,

>but when I do that I immediately LOSE TV channels because I am useing a roof & a mountain to receive some of my TV stations.

>

>Thank you,

>mike

>

>.

>

>--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, "jhtaylor2001" jhtaylor2001@...> wrote:

>>

>>

>>

>> --- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Robert Williams will7370@> wrote:

>> >

>> > Curious question in this regard.. What's more likely to bring in a hot

>> > enough signal?:. A) 1 antenna on a tower with good amplification, or B)

>> > many antennas on a tower with good amplification?. Do more antennas work

>> > better?. Or are they just duplicating what's already there?

>> >

>> > Rob

>> The science is too new to be really firm. UHF signals tend to refract, or bend, to varying degrees. A signal might be fine at one antenna height, and gone 2 feet above or below. Stacking folded dipoles as I suggested helps "find" a signal. There would probably be no good reason to stack antennas if there was a true "line of sight". Most viewers are not going to see any transmitters. There is some literature on this, classically involving UHF signal movement through trees. My own experience has me believing I will more likely find a UHF signal if my antenna receives from multiple heights. Some have motorized their mast to go up and down.

>>

>

>

>

>

---------------

>

>Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>

>



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







Contact Us
This Site's Privacy Policy
Google's privacy policies

S
e
n
i
o
r
T
u
b
e
.
o
r
g