Re: [TV_Antennas] Re: Antenna orientation


Dec 3, 2008

 


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#127 Dec 3, 2008

Tried as I might to avoid the conclusion, it seems on good signals,

height is not always a positive. I have placed several not very

directional antennas in a lot of places, and I am convinced that, the

way digital tuners work, a more stable performance is available closer

to the ground. I'm lucky, and unlucky both in that my reciever is

somewhat lower than the general lay of the land around. A road on one

side causes problems if the antenna is close to its level, as tall

vehicles, trucks, will break up reception biefly; if the anntena is

placed lower than road level, no such thing happens. Even if this makes

sense, it was a little surprising, but its luck I could figure that

out. On marginal signals, I have to direct an antenna, a directional

one, toward a point that may not actually be a straight line to the

transmitter, and, the antenna has to be positioned up, or down, as the

ground plane isn't always the best orientation.

One more thing. Any major problems we might be having are not going to

get fixed easily now, as the weather in most places has turned

difficult. The obvious is, any chance better be taken advantage of.



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#128 Dec 3, 2008

When orienting your antenna, which do you do first; do you use the signal strength meter on.your receiver to initially find a channel?. Or do you do a channel scan first to see what's out there?. It's kind of like the chicken and the egg scenario.. Which comes first?. Will a digital receiver recognize a signal (on the strength meter) without being "scanned for" first?. But if you have to scan for it first, you may not see it at all if your antenna is not aligned properly.. You almost have to know where your transmitters/translators are first, before you even try to pick up a station.. I wonder how many Joe Six-Packs here in the US will be raising Cain on the phone with station engineers on the morning of February 17th?. If I was a station engineer, I think I might put in for a two week vacation beginning February 15th.

.

Rob

--- On Wed, 12/3/08, James h Taylor jhtaylor2001@...> wrote:



From: James h Taylor jhtaylor2001@...>

Subject: [TV_Antennas] Antenna orientation

To: TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, December 3, 2008, 7:55 AM













Tried as I might to avoid the conclusion, it seems on good signals,

height is not always a positive. I have placed several not very

directional antennas in a lot of places, and I am convinced that, the

way digital tuners work, a more stable performance is available closer

to the ground. I'm lucky, and unlucky both in that my reciever is

somewhat lower than the general lay of the land around. A road on one

side causes problems if the antenna is close to its level, as tall

vehicles, trucks, will break up reception biefly; if the anntena is

placed lower than road level, no such thing happens. Even if this makes

sense, it was a little surprising, but its luck I could figure that

out. On marginal signals, I have to direct an antenna, a directional

one, toward a point that may not actually be a straight line to the

transmitter, and, the antenna has to be positioned up, or down, as the

ground plane isn't always the best orientation.

One more thing. Any major problems we might be having are not going to

get fixed easily now, as the weather in most places has turned

difficult. The obvious is, any chance better be taken advantage of.





































[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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#129 Dec 3, 2008

You went through a bunch there, Bob. Chicken and egg is what a lot of

us face. I've barely used by convertor box, which has a meter, in

favor of my digital TV, which does not have one. I use a scan, after

determining favorable atmospherics using analog; sometimes I can work

a new digital that way; of course, I've not been able to keep them,

I can recieve all that I might reasonably expect with the non-

directional antenna. There are some others that I might be able to

pick-up by aiming, and do, but I don't really need them. I'm lucky

there, I suppose. I will miss the stations from 80 miles out after

the transition, but I can see no reasonable way to get them, short of

an antenna farm. I've got a couple of more cards up my sleeve that

might play. I'll report if I get anywhere. Have you been able to get

your translator back?











--- In TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com, Robert Williams will7370@...>

wrote: >

> When orienting your antenna, which do you do first; do you use the

signal strength meter on.your receiver to initially find a channel?.

Or do you do a channel scan first to see what's out there?. It's kind

of like the chicken and the egg scenario.. Which comes first?. Will a

digital receiver recognize a signal (on the strength meter) without

being "scanned for" first?. But if you have to scan for it first, you

may not see it at all if your antenna is not aligned properly.. You

almost have to know where your transmitters/translators are first,

before you even try to pick up a station.. I wonder how many Joe Six-

Packs here in the US will be raising Cain on the phone with station

engineers on the morning of February 17th?. If I was a station

engineer, I think I might put in for a two week vacation beginning

February 15th. > .

> Rob

>

> --- On Wed, 12/3/08, James h Taylor jhtaylor2001@...> wrote:

>

> From: James h Taylor jhtaylor2001@...>

> Subject: [TV_Antennas] Antenna orientation

> To: TV_Antennas@yahoogroups.com

> Date: Wednesday, December 3, 2008, 7:55 AM

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Tried as I might to avoid the conclusion, it seems on good signals,

> height is not always a positive. I have placed several not very

> directional antennas in a lot of places, and I am convinced that,

the > way digital tuners work, a more stable performance is available

closer > to the ground. I'm lucky, and unlucky both in that my reciever is

> somewhat lower than the general lay of the land around. A road on

one > side causes problems if the antenna is close to its level, as tall

> vehicles, trucks, will break up reception biefly; if the anntena is

> placed lower than road level, no such thing happens. Even if this

makes > sense, it was a little surprising, but its luck I could figure that

> out. On marginal signals, I have to direct an antenna, a

directional > one, toward a point that may not actually be a straight line to the

> transmitter, and, the antenna has to be positioned up, or down, as

the > ground plane isn't always the best orientation.

> One more thing. Any major problems we might be having are not going

to > get fixed easily now, as the weather in most places has turned

> difficult. The obvious is, any chance better be taken advantage of.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>







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#130 Dec 3, 2008

--- On Wed, 12/3/08, James h Taylor jhtaylor2001@...> wrote:

>Have you been able to get your translator back?



It came back for a day or two, then disappeared again. I'm almost certain the station is playing with power levels. Once they kill the analog feed, I hope they will be jacking the power up on the digital.



Rob KC7BUM

Grants Pass, Oregon



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