VintageBigBlue.org

 

RE: [Losmandy_users] Re: Polar Aligning


May 27, 2001

 


----------------------------

#4306 May 27, 2001

Gary and Bill,



Thanks for your responses. I will keep working on it.



Mike Chapa



----------------------------

#9943 Apr 26, 2002

Now I knwo this is going to sound daft but I have forgotten how to

adjust the polar alignment of my HGM200. It is slightly off in

altitude so needs moving higher, northwards.



Looking at the base of the mount the E-W adjustments are made in a

push-pull arrangment using the two silver coloured knobs. No problems.



But for altitude, I thought you use the large plastic black knob and

screw in to raise, and out to lower. When I tried it, it seemd to

just do E-W movements. What have I forgotten, with no manual, and it

being a long time since I did it I have forgotten. Do I need to

tighten or loosen something.



The E-W adjusters are slightly loose, is that causing the problems???



It is clear here in the UK and I would like to get the alignment done

soon as we have a full moon.



----------------------------

#9951 Apr 26, 2002

Hi George,



Before the large black knob will raise or lower the mount you must

first loosen the large allen headed bolts located on either side of

it. You will need a big allen key to fit these bolts.



Also, make sure all the bolts are tight prior to imaging(including

the E-W adjusters) to ensure the the mount will not move. Be careful

because you will find that as you tighten them the alignment of the

mount changes slightly.



Good Luck, Richard



--- In Losmandy_users@y..., "sallit2" sallit2@y...> wrote:

> Now I knwo this is going to sound daft but I have forgotten how to

> adjust the polar alignment of my HGM200. It is slightly off in

> altitude so needs moving higher, northwards.

>

> Looking at the base of the mount the E-W adjustments are made in a

> push-pull arrangment using the two silver coloured knobs. No

problems.

>

> But for altitude, I thought you use the large plastic black knob

and

> screw in to raise, and out to lower. When I tried it, it seemd to

> just do E-W movements. What have I forgotten, with no manual, and

it

> being a long time since I did it I have forgotten. Do I need to

> tighten or loosen something.

>

> The E-W adjusters are slightly loose, is that causing the

problems???

>

> It is clear here in the UK and I would like to get the alignment

done

> soon as we have a full moon.



----------------------------

#16024 Jul 2, 2003

I have used this self invented method for many years now on my former

mounts (EQ6 and GP-DX) and intend to do it on my newly bought GM11.



The method is very easy: Attach a cheap laser-pointer on the polar axis

part of the mount - but so that it points backwards and at least 10 meters -

to the ground. Hence it has to be raised a little. Its important that this

is very rigid - glueing wont do in my experience - it will have to be

screwed in some way to the mount. It must not move the slightest when you

take in/out the mount or if you touch it too hard.



Now make your "perfect" polar alignement - hit the light button on the

laser and place a rigid white solid board where the beam hits. Make a solid

mark there. (I have also made some target rings around the hit spot.)



Now, the next time you take out the telescope, if you just keep the tripod

leg heights and placement on the ground within a few centimeters (do mark

the places of the feet on the ground, or do as I - use pre-downed

poleholders, they fit perfectly to most tripods..), then for "obvious"

arithmetic reasons, if you adjust the AZ and EL screws so that the laser

again pionts at the hit spot - You are perfectly aligned again with great

amplification.



For my new GM11 I have built a concrete pier - but I will have to take in

the mount anyway now and then so I will do this assembly - but might point

towards my neighbors chimney or so - to get even more

amplification/precision.



Goran



p.s.



Sent this idea twice before, to sci astro in 98 but no one reacted.















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#16037 Jul 3, 2003

Sounds like a great idea. I can lase my garage wall 10 yards away by

placing a mirror flat on the driveway where it first hits. I could

put a red sticker on that spot on the wall as a target.



Could the laser be attached somewhere with hot glue. It could be

removed anytime later with a sharp rap, or a little heat.





-- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, "G. Thisell" info@s...> wrote: >

> I have used this self invented method for many years now on my

former > mounts (EQ6 and GP-DX) and intend to do it on my newly bought GM11.

>

> The method is very easy: Attach a cheap laser-pointer on the

polar axis > part of the mount - but so that it points backwards and at least 10

meters - > to the ground. Hence it has to be raised a little. Its important

that this > is very rigid - glueing wont do in my experience - it will have to

be > screwed in some way to the mount. It must not move the slightest

when you > take in/out the mount or if you touch it too hard.

>

> Now make your "perfect" polar alignement - hit the light button

on the > laser and place a rigid white solid board where the beam hits.

Make a solid > mark there. (I have also made some target rings around the hit

spot.) >

> Now, the next time you take out the telescope, if you just keep

the tripod > leg heights and placement on the ground within a few centimeters

(do mark > the places of the feet on the ground, or do as I - use pre-downed

> poleholders, they fit perfectly to most tripods..), then

for "obvious" > arithmetic reasons, if you adjust the AZ and EL screws so that the

laser > again pionts at the hit spot - You are perfectly aligned again with

great > amplification.

>

> For my new GM11 I have built a concrete pier - but I will have to

take in > the mount anyway now and then so I will do this assembly - but

might point > towards my neighbors chimney or so - to get even more

> amplification/precision.

>

> Goran

>

> p.s.

>

> Sent this idea twice before, to sci astro in 98 but no one

reacted. >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#16038 Jul 3, 2003

Hi Goran,



My mount is on a wheeled platform. When it is rolled out of the observatory

I lower it so that 2 index pins on the platform drop into holes drilled in

my concrete observing pad. The polar alignment, though close, still moves a

little each time. I plan on trying your laser trick to do the fine

adjustments.



I will report later on how well it works.



Thanks for the tip.



Bob



----------------------------

#16039 Jul 4, 2003

Hot glue didnt work for me, but maybe you have a better climate than I have

in Sweden... Though it can easilly be peeled of - so why not try it first to

see if the method works for you!

Good luck.

Goran



-----Ursprungligt meddelande-----

Fr.n: badger_al [mailto:abarak@...]

Skickat: den 4 juli 2003 03:08

Till: Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com

.mne: [Losmandy_users] Re: Polar aligning with a laser beam.





Sounds like a great idea. I can lase my garage wall 10 yards away by

placing a mirror flat on the driveway where it first hits. I could

put a red sticker on that spot on the wall as a target.



Could the laser be attached somewhere with hot glue. It could be

removed anytime later with a sharp rap, or a little heat.





-- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, "G. Thisell" info@s...> wrote: >

> I have used this self invented method for many years now on my

former > mounts (EQ6 and GP-DX) and intend to do it on my newly bought GM11.

>

> The method is very easy: Attach a cheap laser-pointer on the

polar axis > part of the mount - but so that it points backwards and at least 10

meters - > to the ground. Hence it has to be raised a little. Its important

that this > is very rigid - glueing wont do in my experience - it will have to

be > screwed in some way to the mount. It must not move the slightest

when you > take in/out the mount or if you touch it too hard.

>

> Now make your "perfect" polar alignement - hit the light button

on the > laser and place a rigid white solid board where the beam hits.

Make a solid > mark there. (I have also made some target rings around the hit

spot.) >

> Now, the next time you take out the telescope, if you just keep

the tripod > leg heights and placement on the ground within a few centimeters

(do mark > the places of the feet on the ground, or do as I - use pre-downed

> poleholders, they fit perfectly to most tripods..), then

for "obvious" > arithmetic reasons, if you adjust the AZ and EL screws so that the

laser > again pionts at the hit spot - You are perfectly aligned again with

great > amplification.

>

> For my new GM11 I have built a concrete pier - but I will have to

take in > the mount anyway now and then so I will do this assembly - but

might point > towards my neighbors chimney or so - to get even more

> amplification/precision.

>

> Goran

>

> p.s.

>

> Sent this idea twice before, to sci astro in 98 but no one

reacted. >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#16045 Jul 4, 2003

Maybe RTV (silicone sealer) would work. It would not be hard and be

easily knocked off by a bump. Also, it can be peeled of metal

surfaces easily.



I marked the place in my driveway where the tripod legs go. I put

masking tape around the legs, and spray painted around the leg to

give a perfect square where they go. With full leg extension, it is

easy to re-align. No need to even level the mount, it is very close

anyways.





--- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, "G. Thisell" info@s...> wrote:

> Hot glue didnt work for me, but maybe you have a better climate

than I have

> in Sweden... Though it can easilly be peeled of - so why not try it

first to

> see if the method works for you!

> Good luck.

> Goran

>

> -----Ursprungligt meddelande-----

> Fr.n: badger_al [mailto:abarak@c...]

> Skickat: den 4 juli 2003 03:08

> Till: Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com

> .mne: [Losmandy_users] Re: Polar aligning with a laser beam.

>

>

> Sounds like a great idea. I can lase my garage wall 10 yards

away by

> placing a mirror flat on the driveway where it first hits. I

could

> put a red sticker on that spot on the wall as a target.

>

> Could the laser be attached somewhere with hot glue. It could be

> removed anytime later with a sharp rap, or a little heat.

>

>

> -- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, "G. Thisell" info@s...>

wrote:

> >

> > I have used this self invented method for many years now on my

> former

> > mounts (EQ6 and GP-DX) and intend to do it on my newly bought

GM11.

> >

> > The method is very easy: Attach a cheap laser-pointer on the

> polar axis

> > part of the mount - but so that it points backwards and at

least 10

> meters -

> > to the ground. Hence it has to be raised a little. Its important

> that this

> > is very rigid - glueing wont do in my experience - it will have

to

> be

> > screwed in some way to the mount. It must not move the slightest

> when you

> > take in/out the mount or if you touch it too hard.

> >

> > Now make your "perfect" polar alignement - hit the light

button

> on the

> > laser and place a rigid white solid board where the beam hits.

> Make a solid

> > mark there. (I have also made some target rings around the hit

> spot.)

> >

> > Now, the next time you take out the telescope, if you just

keep

> the tripod

> > leg heights and placement on the ground within a few centimeters

> (do mark

> > the places of the feet on the ground, or do as I - use pre-

downed

> > poleholders, they fit perfectly to most tripods..), then

> for "obvious"

> > arithmetic reasons, if you adjust the AZ and EL screws so that

the

> laser

> > again pionts at the hit spot - You are perfectly aligned again

with

> great

> > amplification.

> >

> > For my new GM11 I have built a concrete pier - but I will

have to

> take in

> > the mount anyway now and then so I will do this assembly - but

> might point

> > towards my neighbors chimney or so - to get even more

> > amplification/precision.

> >

> > Goran

> >

> > p.s.

> >

> > Sent this idea twice before, to sci astro in 98 but no one

> reacted.

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

> Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

> ADVERTISEMENT

>

>

>

>

> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:

> Losmandy_users-unsubscribe@egroups.com

>

>

>

> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of

Service.

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#16050 Jul 4, 2003

When I saw this post, I could only think of the Green Laser pointers now so

popular at star parties. They seem to go straight up to the stars (obviously they

do not).



I thought you were going to say that you could make a collar for one, so you

could insert it like a polar scope. Then you just adjust the mount so the laser is

hitting the celestial pole (you could determine its location with a planisphere).



Should work.

--- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, "G. Thisell" info@s...> wrote:

>

> I have used this self invented method for many years now on my former

> mounts (EQ6 and GP-DX) and intend to do it on my newly bought GM11.

>

> The method is very easy: Attach a cheap laser-pointer on the polar axis

> part of the mount - but so that it points backwards and at least 10 meters -

> to the ground. Hence it has to be raised a little. Its important that this

> is very rigid - glueing wont do in my experience - it will have to be

> screwed in some way to the mount. It must not move the slightest when you

> take in/out the mount or if you touch it too hard.

>

> Now make your "perfect" polar alignement - hit the light button on the

> laser and place a rigid white solid board where the beam hits. Make a solid

> mark there. (I have also made some target rings around the hit spot.)

>

> Now, the next time you take out the telescope, if you just keep the tripod

> leg heights and placement on the ground within a few centimeters (do mark

> the places of the feet on the ground, or do as I - use pre-downed

> poleholders, they fit perfectly to most tripods..), then for "obvious"

> arithmetic reasons, if you adjust the AZ and EL screws so that the laser

> again pionts at the hit spot - You are perfectly aligned again with great

> amplification.

>

> For my new GM11 I have built a concrete pier - but I will have to take in

> the mount anyway now and then so I will do this assembly - but might point

> towards my neighbors chimney or so - to get even more

> amplification/precision.

>

> Goran

>

> p.s.

>

> Sent this idea twice before, to sci astro in 98 but no one reacted.

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#41459 Feb 1 11:12 AM

Hello all, finally got my g-11 out for the first time. Ive owned it

for a month, but this was the first clear night (in chicago area) that

i was able to use it.



I have a question though, i thought i had a pretty good polar

alignment through the polar scope. I had polaris in the right spot as

well as the "second star". With my heavily light polluted skies, i

couldnt see the third star.



After I had it aligned, i looked through the ota in my refractor, and

polaris was not in the center of the FOV. Is this normal? I was

worried i had the polar alignment set up wrong, so i checked and

rechecked it. I then decided to move the ota so that polaris was in

the center of my FOV for the eyepiece i had (which is a 25mm on a

777mm scope, equals 31x mag).



I then aligned betelgeuse, then sirius, and then m42, in that order.



When i would then do a go to, it really wasnt that accurate. I tried

to go to saturn, it brough me close enough i could move around and

find it. I then tried to go to some stars in ursa major, and then M1.

It was all a little off. Just to check, i tried to go back to m42 with

the go to again, and it was spot on.



Any idea what i did wrong here? Do i just need to align more stars?

Should i not have moved the ota so that it was aligned with polaris?



Please help!



jack



----------------------------

#41460 Feb 1 11:38 AM

When you say you aligned to Sirius, etc are you talking about using the

Gemini system. If so, you need to build a better model for sure.

Sirius and Betelgeuse are only about an hour apart and M42 really isn't

a good object to align on. You need a point source like a star. Plus

M42 is almost the same RA as Betelgeuse.



Jim



jackoziol wrote: > Hello all, finally got my g-11 out for the first time. Ive owned it

> for a month, but this was the first clear night (in chicago area) that

> i was able to use it.

>

> I have a question though, i thought i had a pretty good polar

> alignment through the polar scope. I had polaris in the right spot as

> well as the "second star". With my heavily light polluted skies, i

> couldnt see the third star.

>

> After I had it aligned, i looked through the ota in my refractor, and

> polaris was not in the center of the FOV. Is this normal? I was

> worried i had the polar alignment set up wrong, so i checked and

> rechecked it. I then decided to move the ota so that polaris was in

> the center of my FOV for the eyepiece i had (which is a 25mm on a

> 777mm scope, equals 31x mag).

>

> I then aligned betelgeuse, then sirius, and then m42, in that order.

>

> When i would then do a go to, it really wasnt that accurate. I tried

> to go to saturn, it brough me close enough i could move around and

> find it. I then tried to go to some stars in ursa major, and then M1.

> It was all a little off. Just to check, i tried to go back to m42 with

> the go to again, and it was spot on.

>

> Any idea what i did wrong here? Do i just need to align more stars?

> Should i not have moved the ota so that it was aligned with polaris?

>

> Please help!

>

> jack

>

>

---------------

>

> Yahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>

>







----------------------------

#41461 Feb 1 11:43 AM

Thanks Jim! Yes, I am using the gemini system.



Good advice on star choices. I chose them because i easily know what

they are in the sky and wont make a mistake. I guess I should learn

some more stars. Do you think its best to switch eyepieces and

increase magnification as much as possible before I synchronize?



What about my ota not being aligned with polaris in the polar scope?

Does that matter?





--- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, Jim Jones albiero@...> wrote:

>

> When you say you aligned to Sirius, etc are you talking about using the

> Gemini system. If so, you need to build a better model for sure.

> Sirius and Betelgeuse are only about an hour apart and M42 really isn't

> a good object to align on. You need a point source like a star. Plus

> M42 is almost the same RA as Betelgeuse.

>

> Jim

>

> jackoziol wrote:

> > Hello all, finally got my g-11 out for the first time. Ive owned it

> > for a month, but this was the first clear night (in chicago area) that

> > i was able to use it.

> >

> > I have a question though, i thought i had a pretty good polar

> > alignment through the polar scope. I had polaris in the right spot as

> > well as the "second star". With my heavily light polluted skies, i

> > couldnt see the third star.

> >

> > After I had it aligned, i looked through the ota in my refractor, and

> > polaris was not in the center of the FOV. Is this normal? I was

> > worried i had the polar alignment set up wrong, so i checked and

> > rechecked it. I then decided to move the ota so that polaris was in

> > the center of my FOV for the eyepiece i had (which is a 25mm on a

> > 777mm scope, equals 31x mag).

> >

> > I then aligned betelgeuse, then sirius, and then m42, in that order.

> >

> > When i would then do a go to, it really wasnt that accurate. I tried

> > to go to saturn, it brough me close enough i could move around and

> > find it. I then tried to go to some stars in ursa major, and then M1.

> > It was all a little off. Just to check, i tried to go back to m42 with

> > the go to again, and it was spot on.

> >

> > Any idea what i did wrong here? Do i just need to align more stars?

> > Should i not have moved the ota so that it was aligned with polaris?

> >

> > Please help!

> >

> > jack

> >

> >

---------------

> >

> > Yahoo! Groups Links

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

>



----------------------------

#41462 Feb 1 12:08 PM

Jack,



Polaris is about 3/4. away from the Celestial Pole, so you to set the mount to the coordinates of

Polaris for it to be in the center of the FOV of your refractor.



Don

----- Original Message -----

From: "jackoziol" jack@...>

To: Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Sunday, February 01, 2009 2:12 PM

Subject: [Losmandy_users] Question on polar aligning in polar scope vs. viewing in OTA





> Hello all, finally got my g-11 out for the first time. Ive owned it

> for a month, but this was the first clear night (in chicago area) that

> i was able to use it.

>

> I have a question though, i thought i had a pretty good polar

> alignment through the polar scope. I had polaris in the right spot as

> well as the "second star". With my heavily light polluted skies, i

> couldnt see the third star.

>

> After I had it aligned, i looked through the ota in my refractor, and

> polaris was not in the center of the FOV. Is this normal? I was

> worried i had the polar alignment set up wrong, so i checked and

> rechecked it. I then decided to move the ota so that polaris was in

> the center of my FOV for the eyepiece i had (which is a 25mm on a

> 777mm scope, equals 31x mag).

>

> I then aligned betelgeuse, then sirius, and then m42, in that order.

>

> When i would then do a go to, it really wasnt that accurate. I tried

> to go to saturn, it brough me close enough i could move around and

> find it. I then tried to go to some stars in ursa major, and then M1.

> It was all a little off. Just to check, i tried to go back to m42 with

> the go to again, and it was spot on.

>

> Any idea what i did wrong here? Do i just need to align more stars?

> Should i not have moved the ota so that it was aligned with polaris?

>

> Please help!

>

> jack



----------------------------

#41463 Feb 1 12:18 PM

--- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, "jackoziol" jack@...> wrote: >

> Thanks Jim! Yes, I am using the gemini system.

>

> Good advice on star choices. I chose them because i easily know what

> they are in the sky and wont make a mistake. I guess I should learn

> some more stars. Do you think its best to switch eyepieces and

> increase magnification as much as possible before I synchronize?

>

> What about my ota not being aligned with polaris in the polar scope?

> Does that matter?

>

>



No, you shouldn't have realigned the OTA to center Polaris, since

Polaris is not at the north celestial pole, rather it is 3/4 of a

degree away from the NCP. Trust in your alignment with the polar

scope, then build a Gemini pointing model with at least 4 stars in the

eastern hemisphere and another four stars in the western hemisphere.

Try to use successive alignment stars that are separated by 2 hours in

RA. Start in the north and move through the east to the south, do a

meridian flip and proceed from the south through the west until you

are back at north. Your pointing model will then be very accurate

with all objects centered in your FOV.



Also you need to be sure that your polar scope reticle is accurately

centered in the scope. Commonly the reticle is not accurately

centered as received by the customer. Take the polar scope out of the

mount and lay it upon a tall flat wall so that you can look through it

at some distant object. Center your distant target at the crosshair

intersection and rotate the scope and see if the target stays centered

under the crosshair intersection. A V-block or piece of angle iron

helps in providing a stable platform for rotation. What you will

likely find is that the crosshair orbits around your distant target

showing that the reticle is not centered. You will have to find a

.035" or .9mm allen key wrench to loosen the 3 allen set screws set

120 degrees around the perimeter of the scope tube. Alternately

loosen and tighten the three set screws to move the reticle in the bore

to center the crosshairs under your distant target so that rotation of

the polar scope does not allow the intersection to orbit. Be careful

with the set screws. The reticle is glass and the the set screws push

on the edge of the glass reticle disk. It is easy to crack or chip

the reticle if you try to move the reticle in a direction where you

haven't first loosened the opposing set screws to allow movement in

that direction. After you have successfully centered the reticle,

lightly snug up the set screws. Your polar scope is now accurately

aligned and will provide you with polar alignment easily within 5-10

arc-minutes if your are able to see and align the mount with the three

reference points of the reticle.



I regularly get polar alignment of within 1-2 arc-minutes of the pole

in just 5 minutes.



Cheers,



Keith







----------------------------

#41467 Feb 1 2:46 PM

jackoziol wrote:

> After I had it aligned, i looked through the ota in my refractor, and

> polaris was not in the center of the FOV. Is this normal?



Polaris is about 0.7 degree from the north celestial pole. When you are

accurately polar aligned and the telescope is pointed at 90 degrees

declination, Polaris will not be in the center of the field of view.



Bud



----------------------------

#41492 Feb 3 6:54 PM

Your Polar Alignment was done correctly the first time with it

located in the tiny slot, along with the second star. Polaris will

NOT be in the field of view in the refractor - correct.



Down load the manual from the Gemini website - or read it if you have

one. The manual is well writen and go from there.

--- In Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com, "jackoziol" jack@...> wrote:

>

> Hello all, finally got my g-11 out for the first time. Ive owned it

> for a month, but this was the first clear night (in chicago area)

that

> i was able to use it.

>

> I have a question though, i thought i had a pretty good polar

> alignment through the polar scope. I had polaris in the right spot

as

> well as the "second star". With my heavily light polluted skies, i

> couldnt see the third star.

>

> After I had it aligned, i looked through the ota in my refractor,

and

> polaris was not in the center of the FOV. Is this normal? I was

> worried i had the polar alignment set up wrong, so i checked and

> rechecked it. I then decided to move the ota so that polaris was in

> the center of my FOV for the eyepiece i had (which is a 25mm on a

> 777mm scope, equals 31x mag).

>

> I then aligned betelgeuse, then sirius, and then m42, in that

order.

>

> When i would then do a go to, it really wasnt that accurate. I tried

> to go to saturn, it brough me close enough i could move around and

> find it. I then tried to go to some stars in ursa major, and then

M1.

> It was all a little off. Just to check, i tried to go back to m42

with

> the go to again, and it was spot on.

>

> Any idea what i did wrong here? Do i just need to align more stars?

> Should i not have moved the ota so that it was aligned with polaris?

>

> Please help!

>

> jack

>



----------------------------

#46462 Jul 15, 2010

Recently I have been have a polar aligning problem. It seems when I sent the reticle of the polar scope and align Polaris the scope is too high. I have a 18mm Radian eyepiece I use for aligning. It has a 2 degree field of view with my scope so I should be able to see Polaris near the bottom of the eye piece. When I adjust the scope to produce this view I seem to have the mount noticeably off.



suggestions please.



Bill



----------------------------

#46463 Jul 15, 2010

Purchase a polar alignment scope.! You align the mount, not the scope. A polar alignment scope will give a very good alignment by aligning two stars.



Good luck ----- Original Message -----

From: wbabab2000

To: Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Thursday, July 15, 2010 7:11 PM

Subject: [Losmandy_users] Polar aligning problrm







Recently I have been have a polar aligning problem. It seems when I sent the reticle of the polar scope and align Polaris the scope is too high. I have a 18mm Radian eyepiece I use for aligning. It has a 2 degree field of view with my scope so I should be able to see Polaris near the bottom of the eye piece. When I adjust the scope to produce this view I seem to have the mount noticeably off.



suggestions please.



Bill











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#46466 Jul 15, 2010

wbabab2000 wrote: > Recently I have been have a polar aligning problem. It seems when I sent the reticle of the polar scope and align Polaris the scope is too high. I have a 18mm Radian eyepiece I use for aligning. It has a 2 degree field of view with my scope so I should be able to see Polaris near the bottom of the eye piece. When I adjust the scope to produce this view I seem to have the mount noticeably off.

>

> suggestions please.

>

> Bill

Is the reticle centered on your polar axis?



Is the optical axis of your telescope parallel to the polar axis of your

mount when you have the telescope pointed at 90 degrees declination?



Bud



----------------------------

#60135 Oct 14, 2017

Finally had a clear night here in the Florida panhandle so I took the scope out and set it up here in the apartment perimeter on an asphalt road...Think I made a boo-boo during my setup...

First thing I did was point the scope due north towards Polaris. Then I leveled the scope both directions perfectly. Then after leveling I noticed Polaris was too low while looking thru the RA hole. So I tried to realign Polaris by adjusting the mount height again. (1st Mistake) I realized this after I got back home and thought about it. I should have adjusted the altitude knob on the mount. This knocked out my accuracy. (Book also says, never use the Dec and RA knobs to do Polar alignment)

When I went to an object it was about 1 degree off, or just out of the field of view depending on which Eye piece I was using. At this point I should have started over and releveled the mount. Now I know. I put in a 34 degree eyepiece, then went to M31. I was surprised to find it in there.! I was pretty tired last night from a very busy mental day I had. So I probably wasn't thinking too good. I will do this again, and this time once I level the mount, I will not touch it again...

Now, after all this explaining, my question, does it sound reasonable that what I did is what messed up the accuracy of my scope wjhile going to different objects? I think so...This BTW is my first EQ mount. I used Dobs before only...

I also just printed out about 15 pages of instructions off the Losmandy web site on the set-up of this mount.

Thanks,

Rodney







----------------------------

#60137 Oct 14, 2017

Yes.��Rodney, when you say RA hole, does your mount have a Polar Alignment Scope (w/ reticle) in the hole?If not, your attempts will be very crude at best. And, you are correct, next time use the�� Alt and Az knobs.

As an extra tip, I have always used a small voice recorder in the field to note things (half of which I would forget had I not recorded -ha!) like next time do this or bring that. I also made my own setup checklists -something about typing it in my own words makes it stick in my head better

Hope your good weather holds out��

Jeff



----------------------------

#60138 Oct 14, 2017

Leveling the mount isn.t really critical. Then get the RA axis pointed at the north celestial pole by using the altitude and azimuth adjustments, regardless of what method you.re using for the alignment (polar scope, drift alignment, rough eyeballing, etc.). Remember, the goal is to align with the north pole, which is about 1 degree away from Polaris. As long as the RA axis is aligned with the NCP, it doesn.t matter how level or not level the mount is. Leveling can help speed up some alignment methods, but if you.re visually aligning . with a polar scope or the main scope or just looking through the polar scope hole . leveling is completely unimportant.



-Les





> On 14 Oct 2017, at 6:54, f4chief73@... [Losmandy_users] Losmandy_users@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>

>

>

> Finally had a clear night here in the Florida panhandle so I took the scope out and set it up here in the apartment perimeter on an asphalt road...Think I made a boo-boo during my setup...

>

> First thing I did was point the scope due north towards Polaris. Then I leveled the scope both directions perfectly. Then after leveling I noticed Polaris was too low while looking thru the RA hole. So I tried to realign Polaris by adjusting the mount height again. (1st Mistake) I realized this after I got back home and thought about it. I should have adjusted the altitude knob on the mount. This knocked out my accuracy. (Book also says, never use the Dec and RA knobs to do Polar alignment)

>

> When I went to an object it was about 1 degree off, or just out of the field of view depending on which Eye piece I was using. At this point I should have started over and releveled the mount. Now I know. I put in a 34 degree eyepiece, then went to M31. I was surprised to find it in there.! ! I was pretty tired last night from a very busy mental day I had. So I probably wasn't thinking too good. I will do this again, and this time once I level the mount, I will not touch it again...

>

> Now, after all this explaining, my question, does it sound reasonable that what I did is what messed up the accuracy of my scope wjhile going to different objects? I think so...This BTW is my first EQ mount. I used Dobs before only...

>

> I also just printed out about 15 pages of instructions off the Losmandy web site on the set-up of this mount.

>

> Thanks,

>

> Rodney

>

>

>

>

>







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#60139 Oct 14, 2017

I'm looking at those now Jeff. Think i will have to get one...The way your eyeball moves around the sight hole, it's hard to say when it is centered. Good point.

Rod



----------------------------

#60140 Oct 14, 2017

Set the scope up in the bedroom and leveled. Put a weighted string down it. this is what I have. Once i do this outside, then zero in on Polaris, and do the two-star alignment, I'm assuming I'm good to go. Correct? But I will need to get the Polar scope...

I posted a couple of photos of it if you want to look what I did.

Rod



----------------------------

#60141 Oct 14, 2017

Like Les stated, for visual use, level is not critical and the NCP is a bit away from Polaris.I used to use a phone app called Polar Finder that shows where the NCP is relative to Polaris for your exact time and location. The level built into the RA axis is all you need to find your CWD position

Jeff



----------------------------

#60142 Oct 14, 2017

I have the phone app, haven't tried it yet...Uh, what is CWD?

Rodney



----------------------------

#60143 Oct 14, 2017

Counter Weight Down



----------------------------

#60144 Oct 14, 2017

I have the phone app, haven't tried it yet...Uh, what is CWD?

CWD == CounterWeight Down ��Dave



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