Re: [funwithtransistors] Re: Help requested


Nov 1, 2009

 


----------------------------

#5 Nov 1, 2009

I need to place more content on the Fun with Transistors website. I would

like to do the same thing for the All Japanese 6 that I did for the All

American 5. Does anyone have a diagram of an AJ6? I would like to study

several schematics to find a typical circuit. I have a pretty good idea of

the circuits, I just want to be sure I don't make any glaring errors.



Oh, and there was that interesting story of the all American transistor

radio developed at TI. Does anyone have the URL of that story?



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

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----------------------------

#7 Nov 1, 2009

These aren't schems, but they're a few interesting sites for classic radios and they do have a few jap radios there too:



classicradiogallery.com/transistor

tabiwallah.com/radiowallah/sony/tr6/tr6genes.html

www.sony.net/SonyInfo/CorporateInfo/History/sonyhistory-b.html

s206301103.websitehome.co.uk/early.sony.htm



This might help you with your search for a schematic anyway.



Bob

--- On Sat, 10/31/09, Max Robinson max@...> wrote:



> I need to place more content on the

> Fun with Transistors website.. I would

> like to do the same thing for the All Japanese 6 that I did

> for the All American 5.. Does anyone have a diagram of an

> AJ6?. I would like to study

> several schematics to find a typical circuit.. I have

> a pretty good idea of

> the circuits, I just want to be sure I don't make any

> glaring errors.

>

> Oh, and there was that interesting story of the all

> American transistor

> radio developed at TI.. Does anyone have the URL of

> that story?

>

> Regards

>

> Max.. K 4 O D S



----------------------------

#8 Nov 1, 2009

Max I am having problems sining in and poasting tothe transistors sight, could you help me. Mike Skidmore I am using a screenreader�� 859-360-3794 thanks..----- Original Message -----From:MaxRobinsonTo: Fun with TransistorsSent: Sunday, November 01, 2009 12:36AMSubject: [funwithtransistors] Helprequested

��I need to place more content on the Fun with Transistors website. I would

like to do the same thing for the All Japanese 6 that I did for the All

American 5. Does anyone have a diagram of an AJ6? I would like to study

several schematics to find a typical circuit. I have a pretty good idea of

the circuits, I just want to be sure I don't make any glaringerrors.

Oh, and there was that interesting story of the all Americantransistor radio developed at TI. Does anyone have the URL of thatstory?

Regards.

Max. K 4 O D S.

Email: max@maxsmusicplace. com

Transistorsite www.funwitht ransistors. netVacuumtube site: www.funwitht ubes.netMusicsite: www.maxsmusi cplace.com

Tosubscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.funwithtransistors- subscribe@ yahoogroups. com

Tosubscribe to the fun with tubes group send an email to,funwithtubes- subscribe@ yahoogroups. com



----------------------------

#9 Nov 2, 2009

Not sure what you mean. Your message came through fine to the list. My fun

with transistors site has no way to sign in and post. I guess you would

call it read only.



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

funwithtransistors-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



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----- Original Message -----

From: "Mike Skidmore" msdc@...>

To: funwithtransistors@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2009 7:32 AM

Subject: Re: [funwithtransistors] Help requested





Max I am having problems sining in and poasting to the transistors sight,

could you help me. Mike Skidmore I am using a screen reader 859-360-3794

thanks..

----- Original Message -----

From: Max Robinson

To: Fun with Transistors

Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2009 12:36 AM

Subject: [funwithtransistors] Help requested





I need to place more content on the Fun with Transistors website. I

would

like to do the same thing for the All Japanese 6 that I did for the All

American 5. Does anyone have a diagram of an AJ6? I would like to study

several schematics to find a typical circuit. I have a pretty good idea of

the circuits, I just want to be sure I don't make any glaring errors.



Oh, and there was that interesting story of the all American transistor

radio developed at TI. Does anyone have the URL of that story?



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

funwithtransistors-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



To subscribe to the fun with tubes group send an email to,

funwithtubes-subscribe@yahoogroups.com







----------------------------

#10 Nov 2, 2009

I live near a public library which has Sams Photofacts available for checkout. If you identify certain models of interest to you, I can scan the schematics and send them to you.



I am sure that you will find far more variation in the transistor radio schematics than you did for the vacuum tube table radios. As you note, the tube radio reached a very mature design that was manufactured for two or three decades or so with minimal changes. Transistor radio designs changed significantly as transistor technology rapidly evolved and prices dropped. You won't find a standard transistor lineup as you did for the tubes, but, as you note, there was a somewhat general design for a six transistor radio.



Transistor radios went through a marketing stage of "more transistors is better" as tube radios did. Early on, there were some two transistor radios with poor selectivity and sensitivity. It took 5 or 6 transistors to build a fairly decent radio. Manufacturing yields were poor, producing a fair number of transistors with low gains. So, manufacturers came out with 8, 10, 12 transistor radios, wiring the dud transistors into the circuits as diodes for bias. The detector diode could also be replaced by a transistor wired in a diode configuration.



The "reflex radio," where one transistor served both as an IF amplifier and an audio amplifier, would be an interesting addition to your site. These were put in production while transistors were very expensive but were no longer manufactured after prices dropped.



Sarah's transistor radios is a good source of pictures: transistor.org/



I have been able to purchase on ebay auctions two of the transistor radio models that I had as a teenager. They are the General Electric 850C transistor.org/collection/ge/geP850C.jpg which is similar to the 850D transistor.org/collection/ge/ge2.html The difference is a thumbwheel on the side for tuning, which made it easier to fine tune stations. My Dad worked for General Electric and bought the radio in the employee store. I paid him with paper route money.



The second is the Columbia 610R. transistor.org/collection/columbia/columbia2.html



The second was won in a radio station call in contest. It had a pocket radio which would slide into a speaker cabinet. A plug built into the speaker cabinet inserted into the earphone jack to disconnect the speaker in the portable radio and connect the larger speaker for better sound. The radio had the advantages over tube table radios of instant sound, no audible hum, and cordless operation. One downside was that the design did not connect a larger, longer lasting battery when the portable radio was inserted in the speaker cabinet. The standard 9 volt battery lasted only a few hours.



Prices dropped enough that consumers could afford both table radios and portable radios. The table radios were powered from flashlight batteries for longer life.



My third acquisition was the GE P-780. My cousin Bob, who lived in rural Maine, wanted to buy a protable radio and asked my Dad to select one for him. My Dad thought Bob needed a radio with superior sensitivity to pick up distant stations. The downside of my Dad's choice is that the radio was very heavy. I brought my pocket radios to Maine and found that they worked very well at night. I think Bob would have been satisfied with a pocket radio like mine.



transistor.org/collection/ge/ge14.html



Be sure to click on the link to the feature article for excellent reading material on the development and technical performance of this radio.



----------------------------

#13 Nov 3, 2009

Do you know if there is a website similar to nostalgia air for transistor

radios?



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

funwithtransistors-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



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----- Original Message -----

From: "jslocke52" jslocke52@...>

To: funwithtransistors@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:11 AM

Subject: [funwithtransistors] Re: Help requested





>I live near a public library which has Sams Photofacts available for

>checkout. If you identify certain models of interest to you, I can scan the

>schematics and send them to you.

>

> I am sure that you will find far more variation in the transistor radio

> schematics than you did for the vacuum tube table radios. As you note, the

> tube radio reached a very mature design that was manufactured for two or

> three decades or so with minimal changes. Transistor radio designs changed

> significantly as transistor technology rapidly evolved and prices dropped.

> You won't find a standard transistor lineup as you did for the tubes, but,

> as you note, there was a somewhat general design for a six transistor

> radio.

>

> Transistor radios went through a marketing stage of "more transistors is

> better" as tube radios did. Early on, there were some two transistor

> radios with poor selectivity and sensitivity. It took 5 or 6 transistors

> to build a fairly decent radio. Manufacturing yields were poor, producing

> a fair number of transistors with low gains. So, manufacturers came out

> with 8, 10, 12 transistor radios, wiring the dud transistors into the

> circuits as diodes for bias. The detector diode could also be replaced by

> a transistor wired in a diode configuration.

>

> The "reflex radio," where one transistor served both as an IF amplifier

> and an audio amplifier, would be an interesting addition to your site.

> These were put in production while transistors were very expensive but

> were no longer manufactured after prices dropped.

>

> Sarah's transistor radios is a good source of pictures:

> transistor.org/

>

> I have been able to purchase on ebay auctions two of the transistor radio

> models that I had as a teenager. They are the General Electric 850C

> transistor.org/collection/ge/geP850C.jpg which is similar to the

> 850D transistor.org/collection/ge/ge2.html The difference is a

> thumbwheel on the side for tuning, which made it easier to fine tune

> stations. My Dad worked for General Electric and bought the radio in the

> employee store. I paid him with paper route money.

>

> The second is the Columbia 610R.

> transistor.org/collection/columbia/columbia2.html

>

> The second was won in a radio station call in contest. It had a pocket

> radio which would slide into a speaker cabinet. A plug built into the

> speaker cabinet inserted into the earphone jack to disconnect the speaker

> in the portable radio and connect the larger speaker for better sound. The

> radio had the advantages over tube table radios of instant sound, no

> audible hum, and cordless operation. One downside was that the design did

> not connect a larger, longer lasting battery when the portable radio was

> inserted in the speaker cabinet. The standard 9 volt battery lasted only a

> few hours.

>

> Prices dropped enough that consumers could afford both table radios and

> portable radios. The table radios were powered from flashlight batteries

> for longer life.

>

> My third acquisition was the GE P-780. My cousin Bob, who lived in rural

> Maine, wanted to buy a protable radio and asked my Dad to select one for

> him. My Dad thought Bob needed a radio with superior sensitivity to pick

> up distant stations. The downside of my Dad's choice is that the radio was

> very heavy. I brought my pocket radios to Maine and found that they worked

> very well at night. I think Bob would have been satisfied with a pocket

> radio like mine.

>

> transistor.org/collection/ge/ge14.html

>

> Be sure to click on the link to the feature article for excellent reading

> material on the development and technical performance of this radio.

>

>

>

---------------

>

> Always keep electrons and holes flowing in opposite directions.Yahoo!

> Groups Links

>

>

>

>







----------------------------

#14 Nov 3, 2009

Wow, that's great! Do you think it'd be possible to get a scan for a SONY Sony TFM-117WA Radio? I once had this radio, but I guess I didn't appreciate it enuff as a teenager and I would luv to get another one. The pics and diagrams will certainly do for now tho.



Thanks,



Bob

--- On Mon, 11/2/09, jslocke52 jslocke52@...> wrote:



> I live near a public library which

> has Sams Photofacts available for checkout. If you identify

> certain models of interest to you, I can scan the schematics

> and send them to you.



----------------------------

#16 Nov 3, 2009

jslocke52 wrote:



[...]

> Transistor radios went through a marketing stage of "more transistors

> is better" as tube radios did. Early on, there were some two



I recall seeing 14 and 20 transistor radios.

> transistor radios with poor selectivity and sensitivity. It took 5 or

> 6 transistors to build a fairly decent radio. Manufacturing yields



Reasonable maximum:



RF amp

mixer

LO

1st IF

2nd IF

Detector (wired as diode)

1st AF

Driver

2xP-P PO



10 transistors is the maximum reasonable number for a single

band receiver. I recall working on one when I was a teenager

which had transistors mounted with all three leads going to

a single land on the PC board, which was isolated entirely

from the circuit. I mean, the three leads of the transistor

were connected to each other, and to nothing else.

> were poor, producing a fair number of transistors with low gains. So,

> manufacturers came out with 8, 10, 12 transistor radios, wiring the

> dud transistors into the circuits as diodes for bias. The detector

> diode could also be replaced by a transistor wired in a diode

> configuration.



A transistor wired as a diode was actually a reasonable thing to

do, as it could have a lower forward drop than just a diode.

> The "reflex radio," where one transistor served both as an IF

> amplifier and an audio amplifier, would be an interesting addition to

> your site. These were put in production while transistors were very

> expensive but were no longer manufactured after prices dropped.



There were reflex tube radios as well, and a patent was issued

for one which ran the signal "backwards" through the circuit

the second time, to limit the interaction between the audio and

RF. I built a reflex radio one time just to experiment with,

and that's the most serious limitation. The AF has a tendency

to "remodulate" the RF (and/or IF) and the resulting IM

distortion is not very pretty.



[...]



Mike

--

p="p=%c%s%c;main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}";main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}

Oppose globalization and One World Governments like the UN.

This message made from 100% recycled bits.

You have found the bank of Larn.

I speak only for myself, and I am unanimous in that!



----------------------------

#17 Nov 3, 2009

Mike McCarty wrote: > jslocke52 wrote:

>

> [...]

>

>> Transistor radios went through a marketing stage of "more transistors

>> is better" as tube radios did. Early on, there were some two

>

> I recall seeing 14 and 20 transistor radios.

>

>> transistor radios with poor selectivity and sensitivity. It took 5 or

>> 6 transistors to build a fairly decent radio. Manufacturing yields

>

> Reasonable maximum:

>

> .RF amp

> .mixer

> .LO

> .1st IF

> .2nd IF

> .Detector (wired as diode)

> .1st AF

> .Driver

> .2xP-P PO

>

> 10 transistors is the maximum reasonable number for a single

> band receiver. I recall working on one when I was a teenager



I forgot to list the reasonable normal complement



converter

1st IF

2nd IF

diode connected detector

1st AF

AF driver

2x P-P PA



8 transistors is a reasonable complement for a single band

receiver with moderate sensitivity using those early not-

so-sensitive Ge transistors.



Mike

--

p="p=%c%s%c;main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}";main(){printf(p,34,p,34);}

Oppose globalization and One World Governments like the UN.

This message made from 100% recycled bits.

You have found the bank of Larn.

I speak only for myself, and I am unanimous in that!



----------------------------

#18 Nov 3, 2009

No doubt, that was a way to claim having more transistors, albeit ONLY phisically--NOT functionally. Just another way they could rip off the public. I guess that was 1 way they did that back then.



Bob

--- On Mon, 11/2/09, Mike McCarty Mike.McCarty@...> wrote:



I recall working on one when I was a teenager

which had transistors mounted with all three leads going to

a single land on the PC board, which was isolated entirely

from the circuit.



----------------------------

#19 Nov 3, 2009

Now, there's that website with all those pictures of transistor radios

complete with model numbers. I knew I should have bookmarked it. Can

anyone post the URL again please?



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

funwithtransistors-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



To subscribe to the fun with tubes group send an email to,

funwithtubes-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

----- Original Message -----

From: "jslocke52" jslocke52@...>

To: funwithtransistors@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:11 AM

Subject: [funwithtransistors] Re: Help requested





>I live near a public library which has Sams Photofacts available for

>checkout. If you identify certain models of interest to you, I can scan the

>schematics and send them to you.

>

> I am sure that you will find far more variation in the transistor radio

> schematics than you did for the vacuum tube table radios. As you note, the

> tube radio reached a very mature design that was manufactured for two or

> three decades or so with minimal changes. Transistor radio designs changed

> significantly as transistor technology rapidly evolved and prices dropped.

> You won't find a standard transistor lineup as you did for the tubes, but,

> as you note, there was a somewhat general design for a six transistor

> radio.

>

> Transistor radios went through a marketing stage of "more transistors is

> better" as tube radios did. Early on, there were some two transistor

> radios with poor selectivity and sensitivity. It took 5 or 6 transistors

> to build a fairly decent radio. Manufacturing yields were poor, producing

> a fair number of transistors with low gains. So, manufacturers came out

> with 8, 10, 12 transistor radios, wiring the dud transistors into the

> circuits as diodes for bias. The detector diode could also be replaced by

> a transistor wired in a diode configuration.

>

> The "reflex radio," where one transistor served both as an IF amplifier

> and an audio amplifier, would be an interesting addition to your site.

> These were put in production while transistors were very expensive but

> were no longer manufactured after prices dropped.

>

> Sarah's transistor radios is a good source of pictures:

> transistor.org/

>

> I have been able to purchase on ebay auctions two of the transistor radio

> models that I had as a teenager. They are the General Electric 850C

> transistor.org/collection/ge/geP850C.jpg which is similar to the

> 850D transistor.org/collection/ge/ge2.html The difference is a

> thumbwheel on the side for tuning, which made it easier to fine tune

> stations. My Dad worked for General Electric and bought the radio in the

> employee store. I paid him with paper route money.

>

> The second is the Columbia 610R.

> transistor.org/collection/columbia/columbia2.html

>

> The second was won in a radio station call in contest. It had a pocket

> radio which would slide into a speaker cabinet. A plug built into the

> speaker cabinet inserted into the earphone jack to disconnect the speaker

> in the portable radio and connect the larger speaker for better sound. The

> radio had the advantages over tube table radios of instant sound, no

> audible hum, and cordless operation. One downside was that the design did

> not connect a larger, longer lasting battery when the portable radio was

> inserted in the speaker cabinet. The standard 9 volt battery lasted only a

> few hours.

>

> Prices dropped enough that consumers could afford both table radios and

> portable radios. The table radios were powered from flashlight batteries

> for longer life.

>

> My third acquisition was the GE P-780. My cousin Bob, who lived in rural

> Maine, wanted to buy a protable radio and asked my Dad to select one for

> him. My Dad thought Bob needed a radio with superior sensitivity to pick

> up distant stations. The downside of my Dad's choice is that the radio was

> very heavy. I brought my pocket radios to Maine and found that they worked

> very well at night. I think Bob would have been satisfied with a pocket

> radio like mine.

>

> transistor.org/collection/ge/ge14.html

>

> Be sure to click on the link to the feature article for excellent reading

> material on the development and technical performance of this radio.

>

>

>

---------------

>

> Always keep electrons and holes flowing in opposite directions.Yahoo!

> Groups Links

>

>

>

>







----------------------------

#20 Nov 3, 2009

I tried the Sams online search for the radio model number, and did not get a match. Further searching indicates that the radio was manufactured in 1986, which may make it too modern for Sams. By that time, new radios were inexpensive enough that very few people took their radios in for repair. However, I can check the Sams catalogs in the library next time I visit.



You can buy an official Sony service manual on ebay for $10 plus $3 shipping:



cgi.ebay.com/Original-Sony-Service-Manual-TFM-117WA-Portable-Radio_W0QQitemZ260483560557QQcmdZViewItemQQptZUS_Audiobooks?hash=item3ca607b46d



Here's some more information from radiomuseum:



www.radiomuseum.org/r/sony_tfm_117wa.html



----------------------------

#21 Nov 3, 2009

"Now, there's that website with all those pictures of transistor radios complete with model numbers. I knew I should have bookmarked it. Can anyone post the URL again please?"



I don't think you'll find any site better than Sarah's Transistor Radios transistor.org



Sarah even has pictures of the world's first production transistor radio, Regency TR-1



She also has a section called "Boy's Radios" which had 2 transistors and qualified for a lower import tax.



As a teenager, I had a two transistor peg board project kit. The transistors, capacitors, resistors, etc. were mounted on plastic holders which plugged into a peg board. A template was placed on the peg board and parts mounted as shown on the template. Then, jumper wires were used to connect the parts together. I recall the kit having 10 projects, including several radios. One radio station came in so strong that I tried connecting a loudspeaker in place of the earphone. The circuit actually provided reasonable volume from a single transistor powered by one flashlight battery.



----------------------------

#22 Nov 3, 2009

I'll see if I can locate them again, I'm pretty sure I can.



Bob

--- On Tue, 11/3/09, Max Robinson max@...> wrote:



> Now, there's that website with all

> those pictures of transistor radios

> complete with model numbers.. I knew I should have

> bookmarked it.. Can

> anyone post the URL again please?

>

> Regards,

>

> Max.. K 4 O D S



----------------------------

#27 Nov 4, 2009

Max et al,



A not very clear schematic for a Sony TR-610 can be found at the bottom of pdf page 16 in Contruire Diverte magazine for January 1960. The issue can be downloaded from



www.introni.it/riviste_costruire_diverte.html



Happy experimenting,



Steven



----------------------------

#35 Nov 5, 2009

Max,



Here ya go:



www.tompolk.com/radios/radios.html

www.angelfire.com/music/TransistorMemories2/

www.radiophile.com/transist.htm



73,



Bob, KD5MHQ

--- On Tue, 11/3/09, Max Robinson max@...> wrote:



> Now, there's that website with all

> those pictures of transistor radios

> complete with model numbers.. I knew I should have

> bookmarked it.. Can anyone post the URL again please?

>

> Regards

>

> Max. K 4 O D S



----------------------------

#36 Nov 5, 2009

Max and all,



These links go pretty directly to superheterodyne transistor radio schematics.



Variety of schematics



www.roetta.it/ik3hia/pages/transistors/transistor_diagrams.htm



Lafayette Scroll down



transistorhistory.50webs.com/lafayette.html



vintageradio.me.uk/kits/roamer6.htm



www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/transch1.jpg



www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/mazda1.jpg



www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/airchief.jpg



Scroll down



www.hilberink.nl/codehans/tsokol2.htm



Happy experimenting,



Steven



----------------------------

#37 Nov 6, 2009

Thanks for sending these sites, very nice. Interesting how the Lafayette KT-119 radio kit cost $33.50 in 1956, and that was without the leather case...another $3.00! I like the way they had sockets for the transistors, similar to the tube radios. Course, that was still the mind set back then. Looks like it was built well.



Bob

--- On Thu, 11/5/09, Steven C steven_coles@...> wrote:



> From: Steven C steven_coles@...>

> Subject: [funwithtransistors] Re: Help requested

> To: funwithtransistors@yahoogroups.com

> Date: Thursday, November 5, 2009, 4:43 PM

> Max and all,

>

> These links go pretty directly to superheterodyne

> transistor radio schematics.

>

> Variety of schematics

>

> www.roetta.it/ik3hia/pages/transistors/transistor_diagrams.htm

>

> Lafayette Scroll down

>

> transistorhistory.50webs.com/lafayette.html

>

> vintageradio.me.uk/kits/roamer6.htm

>

> www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/transch1.jpg

>

> www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/mazda1.jpg

>

> www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/airchief.jpg

>

> Scroll down

>

> www.hilberink.nl/codehans/tsokol2.htm

>

> Happy experimenting,

>

> Steven







----------------------------

#38 Nov 6, 2009

Thanks. I think that will help.



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

funwithtransistors-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



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----- Original Message -----

From: "Bob" bob4analog@...>

To: funwithtransistors@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 4:38 PM

Subject: Re: [funwithtransistors] Re: Help requested





Max,



Here ya go:



www.tompolk.com/radios/radios.html

www.angelfire.com/music/TransistorMemories2/

www.radiophile.com/transist.htm



73,



Bob, KD5MHQ



--- On Tue, 11/3/09, Max Robinson max@...> wrote:



> Now, there's that website with all

> those pictures of transistor radios

> complete with model numbers. I knew I should have

> bookmarked it. Can anyone post the URL again please?

>

> Regards

>

> Max K 4 O D S





---------------



Always keep electrons and holes flowing in opposite directions.Yahoo! Groups

Links



----------------------------

#39 Nov 6, 2009

Pay dirt. This one should keep me busy for a while.



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

funwithtransistors-subscribe@yahoogroups.com



To subscribe to the fun with tubes group send an email to,

funwithtubes-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

----- Original Message -----

From: "Steven C" steven_coles@...>

To: funwithtransistors@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Thursday, November 05, 2009 5:43 PM

Subject: [funwithtransistors] Re: Help requested





> Max and all,

>

> These links go pretty directly to superheterodyne transistor radio

> schematics.

>

> Variety of schematics

>

> www.roetta.it/ik3hia/pages/transistors/transistor_diagrams.htm

>

> Lafayette Scroll down

>

> transistorhistory.50webs.com/lafayette.html

>

> vintageradio.me.uk/kits/roamer6.htm

>

> www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/transch1.jpg

>

> www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/mazda1.jpg

>

> www.hilberink.nl/plaatjeshans/airchief.jpg

>

> Scroll down

>

> www.hilberink.nl/codehans/tsokol2.htm

>

> Happy experimenting,

>

> Steven

>

>

>

---------------

>

> Always keep electrons and holes flowing in opposite directions.Yahoo!

> Groups Links

>

>

>

>



----------------------------

#45 Nov 13, 2009

Max and all,



Starting in the 1956 edition the manuals at



www.introni.it/riviste_radio_diagrams.html



contain diagrams for Emerson, GE, Motorola, RCA, etc transistor receivers.



Happy experimenting,



Steven



----------------------------

#46 Nov 15, 2009

Max and all,



Yet a few more transistor-radio schematics (Heathkit this time):



www.vintage-radio.info/heathkit/#IG5218



The transistor radios are models



GR-24,

GR151A,

UXR-1,

UXR-2 and

XR-2.



Happy experimenting,



Steven



----------------------------

#47 Nov 15, 2009

I have a GR24. I built it for my mother many years ago. When she passed on

it came back to me. The battery holder is broken but it still works just

fine.



Regards.



Max. K 4 O D S.



Email: max@...



Transistor site www.funwithtransistors.net

Vacuum tube site: www.funwithtubes.net

Music site: www.maxsmusicplace.com



To subscribe to the fun with transistors group send an email to.

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----- Original Message -----

From: "Steven C" steven_coles@...>

To: funwithtransistors@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2009 9:03 PM

Subject: [funwithtransistors] Re: Help requested





> Max and all,

>

> Yet a few more transistor-radio schematics (Heathkit this time):

>

> www.vintage-radio.info/heathkit/#IG5218

>

> The transistor radios are models

>

> GR-24,

> GR151A,

> UXR-1,

> UXR-2 and

> XR-2.

>

> Happy experimenting,

>

> Steven

>

>

>

---------------

>

> Always keep electrons and holes flowing in opposite directions.Yahoo!

> Groups Links

>

>

>

>





---------------







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