[ap-ug] Re: ap-ug] Stowaway!


Sep 3, 1999

 


----------------------------

#362 Sep 3, 1999

I woke up early Friday morning and noticed it was mostly clear so decided to

get in a quick observing session. I set the Stowaway up around 8:30 UT and

began by observing M42. Curious about how wide of field of view I could get

in the Stowaway I put in my lowest power eyepiece, a 56mm 2. Meade, which

provides a little over a 6 degree FOV. All of the stars in Orion.s belt, as

well as Orion.s sword, including M42, were visible in the FOV. The exit

pupil was something like 11mm, but of course my pupils cannot possibly

dilate that wide. Still, it was a neat view. Usually such a view is provided

in a pair of binoculars. A 35mm and 27mm Panoptic provided exit pupils more

similar to what my eye can dilate to. Higher magnifications revealed some

nice detail within the nebula.



Then I went over to Jupiter. I was surprised to see there was a fair amount

of detail visible. This included a rift in the North Equatorial Belt (NEB),

an oval along the northern portion of the NEB (NEBn), and two ovals along

the southern part of the NEB (NEBs). Within the Equatorial Zone (EZ) itself

the Equatorial Band (EB) was visible. In the South Equatorial Belt (SEB) a

rift was noted preceding the GRS Hollow (GRSH), and within the GRSH a small

GRS was visible, a pale orange or pink color. Trailing the GRSH were two

ovals. Other detail was visible as well including the North Polar Region

(NPR), North Temperate Belt (NTB), a portion of the North Temperate Zone

(NTZ) and possibly a portion of the North North Temperate Belt (NNTB), and

South Polar Region. All of Jupiter.s moons showed up as disks, and it was

easy to identify which was which based on their size and appearance.



Saturn showed a fair amount of detail as well. The South Polar Cap, South

Polar Region, South Equatorial Belt, and Equatorial Zone were all visible.

In the rings the A-Ring appeared darker then the B-Ring, the Cassini

Division was visible, and there may have been a hint of Crepe ring on one

side of the rings. Nearby Titan, Rhea, and Dione were visible. Note that the

seeing for both Jupiter and Saturn was quite good. It was around 7-8 for

Saturn and 8-9 for Jupiter, so I was able to use up to 155x for Saturn and

180x for Jupiter. I probably could have gone a bit higher in magnification

for Jupiter. I was using the AP/Baader/Zeiss binocular viewer with the

Stowaway.



Venus, low in the eastern sky, with a diameter of over 53., and a phase of

around 7%, was striking. It reminded me of an eclipse of the sun just before

or after totality when the moon has covered up most of it.



The Moon itself had a lot of detail. The Straight Wall was visible, with the

crater Birt casting a long shadow that extended close to it. A long shadow

was noted also across the floor of the crater Plato. Many of the craters,

such as Eratosthenes and Copernicus, showed welled defined central peaks and

terraced walls.



Would I want to Stowaway as my only telescope for observing the planets? No.

Clearly my 130mm f/8.35 AP shows finer detail, just as my 180mm f/9 AP shows

more then the 130mm. But with the Stowaway.s ability to perform well from

low power on wide field deep-sky objects, to high power on the moon and

planets, has been very impressive.



Clear Skies,



Eric Jamison



----------------------------

#363 Sep 3, 1999

Sorry, I meant to preface this post as a response to the recent discussion

of the Stowaway and the usefulness of telescopes of similar aperture for

observing the planets. It has been a long week and I am tired...



-----Original Message-----

From: ericj ericj@...>

To: ap-ug@egroups.com ap-ug@egroups.com>

Date: Friday, September 03, 1999 10:37 PM

Subject: [ap-ug] Re: ap-ug] Stowaway!



>I woke up early Friday morning and noticed it was mostly clear so decided

to >get in a quick observing session. I set the Stowaway up around 8:30 UT and

>began by observing M42. Curious about how wide of field of view I could get

>in the Stowaway I put in my lowest power eyepiece, a 56mm 2. Meade, which

>provides a little over a 6 degree FOV. All of the stars in Orion.s belt, as

>well as Orion.s sword, including M42, were visible in the FOV. The exit

>pupil was something like 11mm, but of course my pupils cannot possibly

>dilate that wide. Still, it was a neat view. Usually such a view is

provided >in a pair of binoculars. A 35mm and 27mm Panoptic provided exit pupils more

>similar to what my eye can dilate to. Higher magnifications revealed some

>nice detail within the nebula.

>

>Then I went over to Jupiter. I was surprised to see there was a fair amount

>of detail visible. This included a rift in the North Equatorial Belt (NEB),

>an oval along the northern portion of the NEB (NEBn), and two ovals along

>the southern part of the NEB (NEBs). Within the Equatorial Zone (EZ) itself

>the Equatorial Band (EB) was visible. In the South Equatorial Belt (SEB) a

>rift was noted preceding the GRS Hollow (GRSH), and within the GRSH a small

>GRS was visible, a pale orange or pink color. Trailing the GRSH were two

>ovals. Other detail was visible as well including the North Polar Region

>(NPR), North Temperate Belt (NTB), a portion of the North Temperate Zone

>(NTZ) and possibly a portion of the North North Temperate Belt (NNTB), and

>South Polar Region. All of Jupiter.s moons showed up as disks, and it was

>easy to identify which was which based on their size and appearance.

>

>Saturn showed a fair amount of detail as well. The South Polar Cap, South

>Polar Region, South Equatorial Belt, and Equatorial Zone were all visible.

>In the rings the A-Ring appeared darker then the B-Ring, the Cassini

>Division was visible, and there may have been a hint of Crepe ring on one

>side of the rings. Nearby Titan, Rhea, and Dione were visible. Note that

the >seeing for both Jupiter and Saturn was quite good. It was around 7-8 for

>Saturn and 8-9 for Jupiter, so I was able to use up to 155x for Saturn and

>180x for Jupiter. I probably could have gone a bit higher in magnification

>for Jupiter. I was using the AP/Baader/Zeiss binocular viewer with the

>Stowaway.

>

>Venus, low in the eastern sky, with a diameter of over 53., and a phase of

>around 7%, was striking. It reminded me of an eclipse of the sun just

before >or after totality when the moon has covered up most of it.

>

>The Moon itself had a lot of detail. The Straight Wall was visible, with

the >crater Birt casting a long shadow that extended close to it. A long shadow

>was noted also across the floor of the crater Plato. Many of the craters,

>such as Eratosthenes and Copernicus, showed welled defined central peaks

and >terraced walls.

>

>Would I want to Stowaway as my only telescope for observing the planets?

No. >Clearly my 130mm f/8.35 AP shows finer detail, just as my 180mm f/9 AP

shows >more then the 130mm. But with the Stowaway.s ability to perform well from

>low power on wide field deep-sky objects, to high power on the moon and

>planets, has been very impressive.

>

>Clear Skies,

>

>Eric Jamison

>

>

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