Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.


Sep 1, 2005

 


----------------------------

#13403 Sep 1, 2005

After having a cheap 12 volt supply (Pyramid, the ones Kendrick sells), fail

while running a previous scope, when I got my AP1200 I did a little

research, and found a supply that is popular with amateur radio operators,

who are also running expensive equipment at 12 volts: The DM-330MV at

www.alinco.com/usa.html . They are widely available, have plenty of

excess capacity for slewing, adjustable voltage, and most importantly are

well built with circuits to protect against failure.



I teach Electrical Engineering, and believe me, you should not risk your AP

(or any other) mount by using a Radio Shack or Pyramid power supply - there

is no comparison.



I did open up the supply and change the green LEDs to red, but you can just

cover them.



- Barry



----------------------------

#13407 Sep 1, 2005

Hi Barry,

I have a couple questions for you.

1. Where did you buy it? I looked at the specs and it is clearly

superior to the Pyramid supplies.

2. What failure mechanism did the Pyramid supply have and did it

affect the units under power.

Thanks, Rick



P.S. I won't be out at dark sky this weekend, so hopefully I will see

you next month.

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Barry Megdal" bmegdal@s...> wrote:

> After having a cheap 12 volt supply (Pyramid, the ones Kendrick

sells), fail

> while running a previous scope, when I got my AP1200 I did a little

> research, and found a supply that is popular with amateur radio

operators,

> who are also running expensive equipment at 12 volts: The DM-330MV

at

> www.alinco.com/usa.html . They are widely available, have

plenty of

> excess capacity for slewing, adjustable voltage, and most

importantly are

> well built with circuits to protect against failure.

>

> I teach Electrical Engineering, and believe me, you should not risk

your AP

> (or any other) mount by using a Radio Shack or Pyramid power

supply - there

> is no comparison.

>

> I did open up the supply and change the green LEDs to red, but you

can just

> cover them.

>

> - Barry



----------------------------

#13421 Sep 2, 2005

Rick:

I bought it from Ham Radio Outlet in Burbank......most amateur radio shops

should have them or have access to them



The Pyramid supply fortunately failed in a way that didn't affect the

connected scope, but after I took it apart at looked at how basic a design

it is, with minimal protection, it could just as well have failed in a worse

way. The Alinco supply is in a completely different category design-wise,

and also since it is a switching supply, it weighs less than the Pyramid,

but runs cool and can put out far more current (30 amps I believe).



I won't be at the club dark sky party either, so hope to see you next month.



- Barry







*****************************************************************

Message: 5

Date: Thu, 01 Sep 2005 20:25:34 -0000

From: "Rick Wiggins" rickwiggins@...>

Subject: Re: Good 12V Power Supply



Hi Barry,

I have a couple questions for you.

1. Where did you buy it? I looked at the specs and it is clearly

superior to the Pyramid supplies.

2. What failure mechanism did the Pyramid supply have and did it

affect the units under power.

Thanks, Rick



P.S. I won't be out at dark sky this weekend, so hopefully I will see

you next month.

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Barry Megdal" bmegdal@s...> wrote:

> After having a cheap 12 volt supply (Pyramid, the ones Kendrick

sells), fail

> while running a previous scope, when I got my AP1200 I did a little

> research, and found a supply that is popular with amateur radio

operators,

> who are also running expensive equipment at 12 volts: The DM-330MV

at

> www.alinco.com/usa.html . They are widely available, have

plenty of

> excess capacity for slewing, adjustable voltage, and most

importantly are

> well built with circuits to protect against failure.

>

> I teach Electrical Engineering, and believe me, you should not risk

your AP

> (or any other) mount by using a Radio Shack or Pyramid power

supply - there

> is no comparison.

>

> I did open up the supply and change the green LEDs to red, but you

can just

> cover them.

>

> - Barry



----------------------------

#13423 Sep 2, 2005

Hi Barry,

I found the Alinco for $149 on the internet:

www.mpaudio1.com/alincoaccessories.html

Is this a good price?



Initially when I selected my supply, I was concerned about any noise

generated from the supply. Ideally I would use batteries, but this is

inconvenient when AC is readilly available. I then picked the Pyramid

because so many AP users ues it with success. In fact, I have never

heard of any damage and your case is actually the first failure I

have heard of. I was additionally concerned about switching supplies

generating noise. Since I am imaging, I want no more noise being

generated than is absolutely necesary. Do you have any feel for the

noise on the output line of the Alinco?

Thanks, Rick

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Barry Megdal" bmegdal@s...> wrote:

> Rick:

> I bought it from Ham Radio Outlet in Burbank......most amateur

radio shops

> should have them or have access to them

>

> The Pyramid supply fortunately failed in a way that didn't affect

the

> connected scope, but after I took it apart at looked at how basic a

design

> it is, with minimal protection, it could just as well have failed

in a worse

> way. The Alinco supply is in a completely different category

design-wise,

> and also since it is a switching supply, it weighs less than the

Pyramid,

> but runs cool and can put out far more current (30 amps I believe).

>

> I won't be at the club dark sky party either, so hope to see you

next month.

>

> - Barry

>

>

>

> *****************************************************************

> Message: 5

> Date: Thu, 01 Sep 2005 20:25:34 -0000

> From: "Rick Wiggins" rickwiggins@e...>

> Subject: Re: Good 12V Power Supply

>

> Hi Barry,

> I have a couple questions for you.

> 1. Where did you buy it? I looked at the specs and it is clearly

> superior to the Pyramid supplies.

> 2. What failure mechanism did the Pyramid supply have and did it

> affect the units under power.

> Thanks, Rick

>

> P.S. I won't be out at dark sky this weekend, so hopefully I will

see

> you next month.

>

> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Barry Megdal" bmegdal@s...> wrote:

> > After having a cheap 12 volt supply (Pyramid, the ones Kendrick

> sells), fail

> > while running a previous scope, when I got my AP1200 I did a

little

> > research, and found a supply that is popular with amateur radio

> operators,

> > who are also running expensive equipment at 12 volts: The DM-

330MV

> at

> > www.alinco.com/usa.html . They are widely available, have

> plenty of

> > excess capacity for slewing, adjustable voltage, and most

> importantly are

> > well built with circuits to protect against failure.

> >

> > I teach Electrical Engineering, and believe me, you should not

risk

> your AP

> > (or any other) mount by using a Radio Shack or Pyramid power

> supply - there

> > is no comparison.

> >

> > I did open up the supply and change the green LEDs to red, but

you

> can just

> > cover them.

> >

> > - Barry







----------------------------

#13433 Sep 5, 2005

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Wiggins" rickwiggins@e...> wrote: > Hi Barry,

> I found the Alinco for $149 on the internet:

> www.mpaudio1.com/alincoaccessories.html

> Is this a good price?

>



Yes, Rick, that is a fair price.



I am also a ham radio operator, but haven't done much in recent years. One of the most

popular models around is the Astron RS-35A (or -35M, if you have to have the meters, which

I think are less desireable when we astronomers are looking for ways to cut down on

extaneous light). This has been around for at least 20 years, and is built like a tank. I know a

lot of hams who swear by it. Mine has run my astro gear since the mid 1990's without a

hitch. Another plus is the lighted switch is RED.



Ronnie



----------------------------

#13434 Sep 5, 2005

I want no more noise being > generated than is absolutely necesary. Do you have any feel for the

> noise on the output line of the Alinco? Rick

>

Rick, a few hams have reported some noise in the low bands, but I doubt that you would have

any problems. These newer switching supplies are much better and more reliable than the

old ones. I still like my old linear, but Astron and others have a lot of happy customers with

the switching supplies. You may want to go to eHam.net reviews and click on the link for

power supplies.



Ronnie



----------------------------

#25790 Sep 26, 2009

Hi,



I've been using a 65AH 12V battery with automatic battery recharge to power the Mach1. It's worked fine - the battery is nearly new. Right now, unconnected to the mount, the battery puts out 14.48 V and where the mount power cord is plugged in the power is 14.04V; but earlier this evening and last week when I was trying to use the mount the power available to the mount was only about 13.3V. The motor struggled and stalled during slewing. I parked the mount and disconnected it. The yellow light was on occasionally, otherwise it was red.



I presume the reason the mount stalled was because of insufficient power? But how does one guarantee 14V output (which is what I understand this mount needs) from a nominally 12V battery? What kind of battery or power supply should I be using?



Thanks,

Neil Folberg



----------------------------

#25791 Sep 26, 2009

I had no trouble with mine using the 12 volt battery, however I slew at a

max speed of 600. What are you slewing at?



Dean



----- Original Message -----

From: "neilhfolberg" neilhfolberg@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2009 5:21 PM

Subject: [ap-gto] 12V power supply for Mach1





> Hi,

>

> I've been using a 65AH 12V battery with automatic battery recharge to

> power the Mach1. It's worked fine - the battery is nearly new. Right now,

> unconnected to the mount, the battery puts out 14.48 V and where the mount

> power cord is plugged in the power is 14.04V; but earlier this evening and

> last week when I was trying to use the mount the power available to the

> mount was only about 13.3V. The motor struggled and stalled during

> slewing. I parked the mount and disconnected it. The yellow light was on

> occasionally, otherwise it was red.

>

> I presume the reason the mount stalled was because of insufficient power?

> But how does one guarantee 14V output (which is what I understand this

> mount needs) from a nominally 12V battery? What kind of battery or power

> supply should I be using?

>

> Thanks,

> Neil Folberg

>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>





---------------







No virus found in this incoming message.

Checked by AVG - www.avg.com

Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.113/2397 - Release Date: 09/26/09

17:51:00



----------------------------

#25796 Sep 26, 2009

Forgot to add that slew speed is 600 and all the cables are pretty heavy duty, installed by a professional electrician when we wired the house - done to an industrial standard.



Thanks for your thoughts on the subject - are there alternatives to the 12V battery power or would a higher amperage battery help?



Neil

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "neilhfolberg" neilhfolberg@...> wrote:

>

> The only thing connected to the battery last night was the Mach1; in the past, when imaging, I also have had an STV autoguider connected, but as I said with no problems.

>

> In between the MAch1 power cord and the battery is an extension to the pier area, about 1.5 meters long. The battery sits about 1 meter from the pier, and the cables run underneath the floor.

>

> Neil

>

> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Howard" howard@> wrote:

> >

> > How are you connected - specifically, what connects the mount's power

> > cord to the battery? What else is connected to this battery?

> >

> >

> >

> > I use my trusty Optima D34M marine battery all the time with no problems

> > at all. But, I have a heavy duty connection to the battery, and a

> > separate battery for everything else.

> >

> >

> >

> > Mag. 7 skies!

> >

> >

> >

> > Howard Hedlund

> >

> > Astro-Physics, Inc.

> >

> > 815-282-1513

> >

---------------

> >

> > From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf

> > Of Dean S

> > Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2009 5:01 PM

> > To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

> > Subject: Re: [ap-gto] 12V power supply for Mach1

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> > I had no trouble with mine using the 12 volt battery, however I slew at

> > a

> > max speed of 600. What are you slewing at?

> >

> > Dean

> >

> > ----- Original Message -----

> > From: "neilhfolberg" neilhfolberg@

> > mailto:neilhfolberg%40yahoo.com> >

> > To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> >

> > Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2009 5:21 PM

> > Subject: [ap-gto] 12V power supply for Mach1

> >

> > > Hi,

> > >

> > > I've been using a 65AH 12V battery with automatic battery recharge to

> > > power the Mach1. It's worked fine - the battery is nearly new. Right

> > now,

> > > unconnected to the mount, the battery puts out 14.48 V and where the

> > mount

> > > power cord is plugged in the power is 14.04V; but earlier this evening

> > and

> > > last week when I was trying to use the mount the power available to

> > the

> > > mount was only about 13.3V. The motor struggled and stalled during

> > > slewing. I parked the mount and disconnected it. The yellow light was

> > on

> > > occasionally, otherwise it was red.

> > >

> > > I presume the reason the mount stalled was because of insufficient

> > power?

> > > But how does one guarantee 14V output (which is what I understand this

> >

> > > mount needs) from a nominally 12V battery? What kind of battery or

> > power

> > > supply should I be using?

> > >

> > > Thanks,

> > > Neil Folberg

> > >

> > >

> > >

---------------

> > >

> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> > > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo

> > groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo> ! Groups Links

> > >

> > >

> > >

> >

---------------

> >

> > No virus found in this incoming message.

> > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com

> > Version: 8.5.409 / Virus Database: 270.13.113/2397 - Release Date:

> > 09/26/09

> > 17:51:00

> >

> >

> >

> >

> >

> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

> >

>







----------------------------

#25810 Sep 28, 2009

In a message dated 9/26/2009 4:22:31 PM Central Daylight Time,

neilhfolberg@... writes:



> I've been using a 65AH 12V battery with automatic battery recharge to

> power the Mach1. It's worked fine - the battery is nearly new. Right now,

> unconnected to the mount, the battery puts out 14.48 V ...

>



How does the automatic battery recharging work?



The smart trickle charger I'm familiar with uses a technique

of high voltage and low amperage to gently charge a

battery and maintain it at a fully charged state.

As I remember, the charging voltage is in the range you're

seeing. Is it possible that you're trying to run off

the battery at the same time that the charging circuit

is active?



Jerry



----------------------------

#25815 Sep 28, 2009

In a message dated 9/28/2009 1:38:02 PM Central Daylight Time,

neilhfolberg@... writes:



> But Rolando, if a charged 12V battery puts out 12.5, it is not then an

> appropriate power source ever for a MAch1 which wants a minimum of 14?

>



Who ever told you that? The Mach1 has the same servo controller as all our

other mounts, and they will certainly run just fine, even at 1200x at 12

volts from a battery. I have two mounts set up in my observatory, and they both

run off old marine batteries. Both batteries have trickle chargers attached

which keeps them full during off-times, but do not supply enough current to

run the servos during observing time.



Rolando





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#25816 Sep 28, 2009

>Yes, that is it, which is why it showed more than 12V when connected. >The actual

output currently is as Rolando suggested less than 12V. >



Neil, my guess is that something's wrong with your charging

circuit, that the battery is being drained at the same

time that it's being charged, so it's not ever actually

being charged properly.





Jerry



----------------------------

#25819 Sep 28, 2009

In a message dated 9/28/2009 2:29:49 PM Central Daylight Time,

neilhfolberg@... writes:



> But in principle, a 12VDC 65 AH car battery is sufficient to run the MACH

> mount? Or bigger is better?



That is plenty. If one of the cells is damaged, then all bets are off. You

might see 14 or even 15 volts with the charger attached, but as soon as you

put a load on it, the voltage will drop like a rock and may be below 11.



Rolando





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#25832 Sep 30, 2009

Thanks all for your advice. The battery is defective and I'm replacing it.



Neil



----------------------------

#59542 Nov 15, 2017

Would this be good to power a Mach1?��

www.amazon.com/SkyRC-Adjustable-Supply-Battery-Chargers/dp/B00TNKEW66



----------------------------

#59544 Nov 15, 2017

Here is a good, powerful, 4-star, switching��power supplycompatible with AP mounts:�� I would describe it as 8 amps intermittent loadand 4 amps continuous.�� AP mounts are less than 2.5 amps.�� Made inChina but claims 11 different safety certifications.�� Double-insulateddesign does not have any ground connections.�� No potential for groundloops.��www.amazon.com/Converter-HOTOR-110-220V-Cigarette-Adapter/dp/B01LX5LRP9����-Christopher EricksonObservatoryengineerSummit KineticsWaikoloa, HI 96738www.summitkinetics.com

��



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 20179:21 AMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: [ap-gto] 12vpower supply.



Would this be good to power a Mach1?��

www.amazon.com/SkyRC-Adjustable-Supply-Battery-Chargers/dp/B00TNKEW66





Virus-free. www.avg.com



----------------------------

#59545 Nov 15, 2017

I have found the Powerwerx to be outstanding. I run my 1100AE on one, and am poised to buy another. Astro-Physics carries them. I used to run Pyramids, but had one jump to 22v on me one day! Don't trust them anymore...

powerwerx.com/variable-power-supply-digital-meters-30amp



CG



----------------------------

#59546 Nov 15, 2017

I.ve been using one of this to power up my Mach 1. So far so good.��

www.cheapham.com/jetstream-jtps14m/

Cheers,Diego

Sent from Diego's iPhone



----------------------------

#59547 Nov 15, 2017

I.m another Powerwerx user (variable power unit). Its perfect! ��From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 12:58 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.



----------------------------

#59548 Nov 15, 2017

We sell them. We use them also.



Rolando







-----Original Message-----

From: chris@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

To: ap-gto ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Wed, Nov 15, 2017 2:43 pm

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.





I have found the Powerwerx to be outstanding. I run my 1100AE on one, and am poised to buy another. Astro-Physics carries them. I used to run Pyramids, but had one jump to 22v on me one day! Don't trust them anymore...

powerwerx.com/variable-power-supply-digital-meters-30amp



CG



----------------------------

#59549 Nov 15, 2017

Hello,

I.m fairly new at AP and still working to put together the most efficient gear for my use. ��When using a variable voltage supply as the Powerwerx what voltage is typically used to power a mount, USB hub, DSLR, etc. ��Leave it fixed at 14.1 volts or dial it down to 13.8 or lower? ��I.m currently using a 12 volt deep cycle battery at home and on the road. ��The voltage reading typically starts around 13.1v and I close up shop before it drops to about 12v. ��

Thanks for any information. Joe

On Nov 15, 2017, at 12:43 PM, chris@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



��I have found the Powerwerx to be outstanding. I run my 1100AE on one, and am poised to buy another. Astro-Physics carries them. I used to run Pyramids, but had one jump to 22v on me one day! Don't trust them anymore...

powerwerx..com/variable-power-supply-digital-meters-30amp



CG







----------------------------

#59550 Nov 15, 2017

You can use any voltage setting from 12.5 to 18 volts and the controller electronics will adjust itself internally. If you live in a very cold climate, aim towards 15 to 18 volts because the friction will increase at cold temps and the motors can use the extra voltage during slews.



Rolando







-----Original Message-----

From: Joseph Beyer jcbeyer@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

To: ap-gto ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Wed, Nov 15, 2017 4:07 pm

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.





Hello,

I.m fairly new at AP and still working to put together the most efficient gear for my use. ��When using a variable voltage supply as the Powerwerx what voltage is typically used to power a mount, USB hub, DSLR, etc. ��Leave it fixed at 14.1 volts or dial it down to 13.8 or lower? ��I.m currently using a 12 volt deep cycle battery at home and on the road. ��The voltage reading typically starts around 13.1v and I close up shop before it drops to about 12v. ��

Thanks for any information. Joe

On Nov 15, 2017, at 12:43 PM, chris@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:





��I have found the Powerwerx to be outstanding. I run my 1100AE on one, and am poised to buy another. Astro-Physics carries them. I used to run Pyramids, but had one jump to 22v on me one day! Don't trust them anymore...

powerwerx..com/variable-power-supply-digital-meters-30amp



CG



----------------------------

#59551 Nov 15, 2017

Joe,��Roland's recommendations are for his AP mounts.�� "Most" other astroequipment really wants to see something closer to 12.0v - 12.4v -- particularlycooled astro cameras.�� Even if they say they're OK to 13.8v, they usuallyperform better or longer at closer to their designed input voltage of12v.��Asit's been explained to me by two astro camera manufacturers��and an astroaccessories manufacturer, voltage in excess of 12.4v gets dissipated asheat.�� This both shortens the life of certain components, as well as heatsup the device.�� And for cooled astro cameras, generating excess heat isabsolutely counter productive.��So, Iwould add the proviso to Roland's recommendation that 14.1v is fine for APmounts, but not-so-fine for the rest of your equipment.��We hada similar discussion just a couple of weeks ago on this forum where one of themembers suggested and recommended using a "Boost/Buck" device to separatelyregulate the voltage to your cameras, focusers,��etc.�� One of thedevices he recommended is a 150 watt (about 7.5��amp at��12v)�� Drokbrand DC to DC voltage regulator.�� It costs around $50 and is packaged verynicely in a self-contained aluminum case.��Ibought one and it works.�� You feed any DC voltage between 5v and 32v intothe input side, and then adjust the output side to something like 12.3v.��This way you can feed 14.1v (or even 16v) to your AP mount, but your camera andaccessories will get a regulated��12.3 volts.��Ofcourse, you can also feed your AP mount exclusively from the 14.1v to 16v powersupply, and then use an inverter to supply AC power to the rest of your camerasand accessories using their factory supplied AC to DCconverters.��Woody����

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Wednesday, November 15, 2017 2:27 PMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��You can use any voltagesetting from 12.5 to 18 volts and the controller electronics will adjustitself internally. If you live in a very cold climate, aim towards 15 to 18volts because the friction will increase at cold temps and the motors can usethe extra voltage during slews.

Rolando







-----OriginalMessage-----From: Joseph Beyer jcbeyer@... [ap-gto]ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>To: ap-gtoap-gto@yahoogroups.com>Sent: Wed, Nov 15, 2017 4:07 pmSubject:Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.



Hello,

I���m fairly new at AP and still working to put together the most efficientgear for my use. ��When using a variable voltage supply as the Powerwerxwhat voltage is typically used to power a mount, USB hub, DSLR, etc.��Leave it fixed at 14.1 volts or dial it down to 13.8 or lower? ��I���mcurrently using a 12 volt deep cycle battery at home and on the road.��The voltage reading typically starts around 13.1v and I close up shopbefore it drops to about 12v. ��

Thanks for any information. Joe

On Nov 15, 2017, at 12:43 PM, chris@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

��I have found the Powerwerx to be outstanding. I run my 1100AE on one,and am poised to buy another. Astro-Physics carries them. I used to runPyramids, but had one jump to 22v on me one day! Don't trust themanymore...

powerwerx..com/variable-power-supply-digital-meters-30amp



CG



----------------------------

#59552 Nov 15, 2017

Do you have a link to this item?�� I see one on amazon, but I think it's the wrong one as it's under 10.00I have a 13.8 power supply ordered. I would like to put one of these on an output to feed my rig runner 12v.

Not being electrically��inclined - I'd like to be sure of what I'm ordering.thanks!



----------------------------

#59553 Nov 15, 2017

Woody and Rolando,

Thanks very much for the helpful information. I.ve been following the thread which has convinced me to purchase a power supply to use where 120v AC is available. �� It simplifies things to run the fixed voltage and use the Drok to modulate the voltage to other equipment with lower voltage requirements. ��

Joe

On Nov 15, 2017, at 2:54 PM, 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



��Joe,��Roland's recommendations are for his AP mounts.�� "Most" other astroequipment really wants to see something closer to 12.0v - 12.4v -- particularlycooled astro cameras.�� Even if they say they're OK to 13.8v, they usuallyperform better or longer at closer to their designed input voltage of12v.��Asit's been explained to me by two astro camera manufacturers��and an astroaccessories manufacturer, voltage in excess of 12.4v gets dissipated asheat.�� This both shortens the life of certain components, as well as heatsup the device.�� And for cooled astro cameras, generating excess heat isabsolutely counter productive.��So, Iwould add the proviso to Roland's recommendation that 14.1v is fine for APmounts, but not-so-fine for the rest of your equipment.��We hada similar discussion just a couple of weeks ago on this forum where one of themembers suggested and recommended using a "Boost/Buck" device to separatelyregulate the voltage to your cameras, focusers,��etc.�� One of thedevices he recommended is a 150 watt (about 7.5��amp at��12v)�� Drokbrand DC to DC voltage regulator.�� It costs around $50 and is packaged verynicely in a self-contained aluminum case.��Ibought one and it works.�� You feed any DC voltage between 5v and 32v intothe input side, and then adjust the output side to something like 12.3v.��This way you can feed 14.1v (or even 16v) to your AP mount, but your camera andaccessories will get a regulated��12.3 volts.��Ofcourse, you can also feed your AP mount exclusively from the 14.1v to 16v powersupply, and then use an inverter to supply AC power to the rest of your camerasand accessories using their factory supplied AC to DCconverters.��Woody����

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Wednesday, November 15, 2017 2:27 PMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��You can use any voltagesetting from 12.5 to 18 volts and the controller electronics will adjustitself internally. If you live in a very cold climate, aim towards 15 to 18volts because the friction will increase at cold temps and the motors can usethe extra voltage during slews.

Rolando







-----OriginalMessage-----From: Joseph Beyer jcbeyer@... [ap-gto]ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>To: ap-gtoap-gto@yahoogroups.com>Sent: Wed, Nov 15, 2017 4:07 pmSubject:Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.



Hello,

I.m fairly new at AP and still working to put together the most efficientgear for my use. ��When using a variable voltage supply as the Powerwerxwhat voltage is typically used to power a mount, USB hub, DSLR, etc.��Leave it fixed at 14.1 volts or dial it down to 13.8 or lower? ��I.mcurrently using a 12 volt deep cycle battery at home and on the road.��The voltage reading typically starts around 13.1v and I close up shopbefore it drops to about 12v. ��

Thanks for any information. Joe

On Nov 15, 2017, at 12:43 PM, chris@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

��I have found the Powerwerx to be outstanding. I run my 1100AE on one,and am poised to buy another. Astro-Physics carries them. I used to runPyramids, but had one jump to 22v on me one day! Don't trust themanymore...

powerwerx..com/variable-power-supply-digital-meters-30amp



CG







----------------------------

#59555 Nov 15, 2017

Here���s a link to the 150 watt Drok Boost/Buck I purchased through Amazon. ��www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00C9UAE28/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 ��Woody ��Do you have a link to this item?�� I see one on amazon, but I think it's the wrong one as it's under 10.00I have a 13.8 power supply ordered. I would like to put one of these on an output to feed my rig runner 12v.

��

Not being electrically��inclined - I'd like to be sure of what I'm ordering.

thanks!

��



----------------------------

#59556 Nov 15, 2017

It says�� 6amp each input.�� I'd like to cut one line from 13.8 down to 12v and feed a rig runner.I suspect the rig runner might be feeding 10 amps.��(asi1600 camera,�� asi290 camera,�� Lynx focuser, heater powered USB hub.��Mount has been on this as well. But I'd separate��that to a 13.8 v



----------------------------

#59557 Nov 15, 2017

Yes, this looks like the same one I bought through Amazon. ��Woody ��www.ebay.com/itm/DROK-DC-DC-6-32V-to-0-8-28V-150W-15A-Adjustable-Boost-Buck-Voltage-Regulator/152764675691?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D41375%26meid%3Ded462f1e212342d8b5f9637c079b4835%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D322811212081&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851 ��

This??



----------------------------

#59559 Nov 15, 2017

I think I did my watts to amps calculation incorrectly. ��This Drok DC to DC Buck/Boost converter is rated at 150 watts.. 150 watts at 12v = 12.5 amps.. That .should. be plenty of power for your cameras and stuff . not including the mount.. But I wouldn.t put a dew heater on the same power line as cameras. ��Woody ��From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:04 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.



----------------------------

#59560 Nov 15, 2017

Hi,�������� One problem with the DROK Buck/Booster is the total lackof documentation . even defining the I/O terminals. I visited the companywebsite, and found nothing but a sales pitch.�������� I would be quite interested in buying any of theirproducts, but I don.t like to hook these up to sensitive telescope equipment andjust run the .smell for smoke test.. Only a fly by night company would sellundocumented products, never mind their warranty in case of fire. But, from theuser experience posts so far, they do seem safe.�������� Has anyone found DROK.s device documentation?Please post a link, or any other docs or diagrams anyone has created ontheir own, on this group Files.��Thanks,Joe Z.



----------------------------

#59562 Nov 15, 2017

5K~15K mount. El cheapo PS? Go with the Powerwerks��PSVPW25A.��www.astro-physics.com/��CG



----------------------------

#59563 Nov 15, 2017

Joe,��I toowish there was documentation other than their crudely worded (or translated) Q/Aposts.�� But the I/O terminals are clearly labeled on the actualdevice.��Theonly thing I wasn't clear on was how to turn "EN" (probably stands for "Enable)ON.�� Until it's turned ON, the device only puts out a very littlecurrent.�� And the label screened on the top of the device also makes thisclear.�� What isn't clear is how to turn it ON.��Withthe help of the Q/A posts I finally discovered that all you apparently need todo is briefly��touch the "EN" terminal with + voltage.�� After justtouching it once with +12v, the variable voltage output was enabled and it worksfine now.�� The blue L.E.D. lit up and I was able to adjust the little potfor output voltage.��Woody��

Hi,�������� One problem with the DROK Buck/Booster is the totallack of documentation ��� even defining the I/O terminals. I visited the companywebsite, and found nothing but a sales pitch.�������� I would be quite interested in buying any of theirproducts, but I don���t like to hook these up to sensitive telescope equipmentand just run the ���smell for smoke test���. Only a fly by night company wouldsell undocumented products, never mind their warranty in case of fire. But,from the user experience posts so far, they do seem safe.�������� Has anyone found DROK���s device documentation?Please post a link, or any other docs or diagrams anyone has created ontheir own, on this group Files.��Thanks,Joe Z.



----------------------------

#59564 Nov 15, 2017

I concur with the other poster there is no way I'm connectinganything other than a high grade power supply to a high grade pieceof equipment like my Mach1.



Michael

On 11/15/2017 8:38 PM, 'Woody Schlom'woody@... [ap-gto] wrote:

.Joe,.I too wish there wasdocumentation other than their crudely worded (ortranslated) Q/A posts.. But the I/O terminals areclearly labeled on the actual device..The only thing Iwasn't clear on was how to turn "EN" (probably standsfor "Enable) ON.. Until it's turned ON, the device onlyputs out a very little current.. And the label screenedon the top of the device also makes this clear.. Whatisn't clear is how to turn it ON..With the help of theQ/A posts I finally discovered that all you apparentlyneed to do is briefly.touch the "EN" terminal with +voltage.. After just touching it once with +12v, thevariable voltage output was enabled and it works finenow.. The blue L.E.D. lit up and I was able to adjustthe little pot for output voltage..Woody.

Hi,.... One problem with the DROK Buck/Boosteris the total lack of documentation . evendefining the I/O terminals. I visited thecompany website, and found nothing but a salespitch..... I would be quite interested in buyingany of their products, but I don.t like tohook these up to sensitive telescope equipmentand just run the .smell for smoke test.. Onlya fly by night company would sell undocumentedproducts, never mind their warranty in case offire. But, from the user experience posts sofar, they do seem safe..... Has anyone found DROK.s devicedocumentation?Please post a link, or any other docs ordiagrams anyone has created on their own, onthis group Files..Thanks,Joe Z.



----------------------------

#59565 Nov 15, 2017

Woody,�������� That sort of seems hit & miss . especially if youhad a power dip, and had to .touch. the ENB to positive.Have you now put a permanent .pull-up. resistor between the ENB (logicenable)�� and Positive?�������� Perhaps powering up the main systems power and supplyingthe device while simultaneously Enabling, might run into a .race condition.,that generates a momentary spike, when its .not quite settled down. to therequired output level, and ready to fire up. Maybe a capacitor on the pull-upresistor might give ENB a .slight charge time delay., just to be safe. What haveother users done to safely provide this signal?�������� I think I will Google the web for a while,�� to seeif there have been any DROK disasters reported yet.�� ...�� I almostaccidentally�� misspelled it DORK :-)��Sure hope this can be trusted . I.ll buy several, if it can be.��Joe







----------------------------

#59566 Nov 15, 2017

That.s why I am using two power supplies: one for my AP Mach 1 set at 13.8VDC and another one for the other components (camera, powered USB Hub, autofocuser, etc) set at 12VDC



Cheers,

Diego



----------------------------

#59567 Nov 15, 2017

Joe,��When Itouched positive voltage to the EN terminal, that apparently flipped an internalswitch that then enabled the higher power output.�� And once I did that, theswitch has been thrown and it works every time I power it up now.�� There'snow nothing attached to the EN terminal.��If yougo back a couple of weeks, you'll find the several posts from "Dave" whooriginally recommended this particular��DROK.�� He has several ofthese��he has been using in his robotic observatory for years -- all on veryhigh-end equipment.�� And he says the equipment is ON 24/7 in the roboticobservatory.��So farI have very little experience with mine.�� But I did vary the input voltagefrom 5v to 16v and the DROK's output voltage��never��changed as much as1/100th of a volt.��Woody����

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Wednesday, November 15, 2017 6:28 PMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��Woody,�������� That sort of seems hit & miss ��� especially if youhad a power dip, and had to ���touch��� the ENB to positive.Have you now put a permanent ���pull-up��� resistor between the ENB (logicenable)�� and Positive?�������� Perhaps powering up the main systems power andsupplying the device while simultaneously Enabling, might run into a ���racecondition���, that generates a momentary spike, when its ���not quite settleddown��� to the required output level, and ready to fire up. Maybe a capacitor onthe pull-up resistor might give ENB a ���slight charge time delay���, just to besafe. What have other users done to safely provide this signal?�������� I think I will Google the web for a while,�� tosee if there have been any DROK disasters reported yet.�� ...�� Ialmost accidentally�� misspelled it DORK :-)��Sure hope this can be trusted ��� I���ll buy several, if it can be.��Joe



----------------------------

#59569 Nov 15, 2017

Brain freeze. ��The Pyramid claims 13.8 VDC (not 12.8). ��



----------------------------

#59570 Nov 15, 2017

Actually I believe Roland was referring to the Powerwerx variable outputPS which AP also sells.�� That's the one the thread wasdiscussing.��I'vehad two Pyramid power supplies.�� The latest one turned out to be "bad" outof the box.�� It fried some cables and smoked a monitor.�� I sent it toHawaii for Christopher to examine and he said it was working OK, but quitewarm.�� He said he wouldn't draw any more than 4 amps from it, even thoughit's rated at 10 amps.�� My older one (exact same model) was working finewhen I lost confidence in the brand and replaced it with a Powerwerx variableoutput one.��Woody��

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Wednesday, November 15, 2017 10:40 PMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��"We��sell them. We use themalso."

I assume youmean the Pyramid power supply. ��When I bought my Mach1 in early 2010, Ialso bought the Pyramid PS-9KX from Astro-Physics. ��I assumed that if A-Psold it, then it was probably dependable, and so it has proven to be duringthe almost 8 years I've had it. ��I have no complaints. ��A few yearsago I read comments on CN that somebody had tested some of these, and theywere putting out less than the claimed 12.8VDC. ��I tested mine a fewminutes ago, and it's putting out 13.9 VDC, which I figure is close enough.��One change I made is with the power cord for the mount. ��A dogchewed up the cigarette-lighter plug, so ! I took the opportunity to strip thewires and install spade lugs to use the screw terminals on the Pyramid.��I duly note the comment about a Pyramid suddenly spiking to 22 volts.��I'll stay alert for any anomalies.



----------------------------

#59572 Nov 16, 2017

My Pyramid was bad out of box too.Exchanged to a new one but it get hot easily (and with some burning smell...).I now only use for dew heater... Power my Mach1 and CCD with another 12v source...

��-Kai

On Wednesday, November 15, 2017, 11:25:23 PM PST, 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:







��Actually I believe Roland was referring to the Powerwerx variable outputPS which AP also sells.�� That's the one the thread wasdiscussing.��I'vehad two Pyramid power supplies.�� The latest one turned out to be "bad" outof the box.�� It fried some cables and smoked a monitor.�� I sent it toHawaii for Christopher to examine and he said it was working OK, but quitewarm.�� He said he wouldn't draw any more than 4 amps from it, even thoughit's rated at 10 amps.�� My older one (exact same model) was working finewhen I lost confidence in the brand and replaced it with a Powerwerx variableoutput one.��Woody��

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Wednesday, November 15, 2017 10:40 PMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��"We��sell them. We use themalso."

I assume youmean the Pyramid power supply. ��When I bought my Mach1 in early 2010, Ialso bought the Pyramid PS-9KX from Astro-Physics. ��I assumed that if A-Psold it, then it was probably dependable, and so it has proven to be duringthe almost 8 years I've had it. ��I have no complaints. ��A few yearsago I read comments on CN that somebody had tested some of these, and theywere putting out less than the claimed 12.8VDC. ��I tested mine a fewminutes ago, and it's putting out 13.9 VDC, which I figure is close enough.��One change I made is with the power cord for the mount. ��A dogchewed up the cigarette-lighter plug, so ! I took the opportunity to strip thewires and install spade lugs to use the screw terminals on the Pyramid.��I duly note the comment about a Pyramid suddenly spiking to 22 volts.��I'll stay alert for any anomalies.







----------------------------

#59573 Nov 16, 2017

Christopher,��Iassume this is addressed to me, and that the tests are to the 150 watt DROK Ihave.�� And once again, I'm not an electrician or engineer, so please bearwith me and understand I might not be conducting the testsproperly.��When Iset my DMM to Ohms and put one lead on the "Vin +" side and the other lead tothe "Vout +" side, I get a reading of 2.159 M ohms.�� There are four Vin +terminals and they all read the same.��When Iset my DMM to Ohms and put one lead on the "Vin -" side and the other lead tothe "Vout -" side, I get a reading of 0.4 ohms to 0.6��on three of theterminals and��0.8 ohms on the last terminal.�� ��Ineach case, I went straight across from terminal #1 on one side to terminal #1 onthe other side..��Woody��

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Thursday, November 16, 2017 12:55 AMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��The minimal specs on this device say it is "non-isolated"but they don't way if it has a common negative side��or a common positiveside.��With an ohmmeter and with no power on the device, checkto see if the + side of the input and output have less than three ohms ofresistance between them or if the - side does.��If the + side of the input and output has less than 3ohms then this device will create destructive ground loops with other deviceson the same 12VDC power supply.��A fully isolated buck circuit design would be best but ifyou can't find that, having the - sides of the input and output with less than3 ohms between them would be the next safest thing.����-Christopher EricksonObservatoryengineerSummit KineticsWaikoloa, HI 96738www.summitkinetics.com

��



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 20171:56 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto]Re: 12v power supply.



www.ebay.com/itm/DROK-DC-DC-6-32V-to-0-8-28V-150W-15A-Adjustable-Boost-Buck-Voltage-Regulator/152764675691?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D41375%26meid%3Ded462f1e212342d8b5f9637c079b4835%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D322811212081&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851

This??

Virus-free.www.avg.com



----------------------------

#59574 Nov 16, 2017

My message was addressed to anyone who had a DROK module thatthey could test.��It sounds like the module has a common negative design, whichis good!�� Minimal risk of ground loops.����-Christopher EricksonObservatoryengineerSummit KineticsWaikoloa, HI 96738www.summitkinetics.com

��



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 201711:51 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto]Re: 12v power supply.



Christopher,��Iassume this is addressed to me, and that the tests are to the 150 watt DROK Ihave.�� And once again, I'm not an electrician or engineer, so please bearwith me and understand I might not be conducting the testsproperly.��When Iset my DMM to Ohms and put one lead on the "Vin +" side and the other lead tothe "Vout +" side, I get a reading of 2.159 M ohms.�� There are four Vin +terminals and they all read the same.��When Iset my DMM to Ohms and put one lead on the "Vin -" side and the other lead tothe "Vout -" side, I get a reading of 0.4 ohms to 0.6��on three of theterminals and��0.8 ohms on the last terminal.�� ��Ineach case, I went straight across from terminal #1 on one side to terminal #1 onthe other side..��Woody��

-----Original Message-----From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Thursday, November 16, 201712:55 AMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto]Re: 12v power supply.

��The minimal specs on this device say it is "non-isolated"but they don't way if it has a common negative side��or a common positiveside.��With an ohmmeter and with no power on the device, check tosee if the + side of the input and output have less than three ohms ofresistance between them or if the - side does.��If the + side of the input and output has less than 3 ohmsthen this device will create destructive ground loops with other devices onthe same 12VDC power supply.��A fully isolated buck circuit design would be best but ifyou can't find that, having the - sides of the input and output with less than3 ohms between them would be the next safest thing.����-Christopher EricksonObservatoryengineerSummit KineticsWaikoloa, HI 96738www.summitkinetics.com

��



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 20171:56 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto]Re: 12v power supply.



www.ebay.com/itm/DROK-DC-DC-6-32V-to-0-8-28V-150W-15A-Adjustable-Boost-Buck-Voltage-Regulator/152764675691?_trkparms=aid%3D555018%26algo%3DPL.SIM%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D41375%26meid%3Ded462f1e212342d8b5f9637c079b4835%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D322811212081&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851

This??

Virus-free.www.avg.com



----------------------------

#59575 Nov 16, 2017

Woody - do you have a link to the actual�� 150w DROK regulator you are using?�� Searching last night for one to go from 13.8 DC to�� 12v DC with 10-15 amps - hasn't come up with anything.��



----------------------------

#59576 Nov 16, 2017

This looks like it's perfect for my needs? I'd like to run one line in at 13.8. and one line out at 12v at 10 amps?. .This way I could power the rig runner and all.12v accessories?

www.amazon.com/DROK-Numerical-Adjustable-Transformer-Potentiometer/dp/B0744BT79M/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1510845234&sr=8-2-spons&keywords=DROK%2Badjustable%2Bvoltage%2Bregulator&th=1







----------------------------

#59577 Nov 16, 2017

Late to the thread, but when I follow the link, it does not go to a battery charger.. The item is actually a variable output power supply.. It.s intended use is to provide power for a separate battery charger. ��It would probably work fine for powering astronomy equipment.. But personally, I use the Powerwerx variable output power supply for my Astro gear (along with the DROK buck/boost converter) and would agree with everyone else that it is a proven product that works well with our gear. ��From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 11:34 AMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] 12v power supply.



----------------------------

#59579 Nov 16, 2017

www.astro-physics.com/products/accessories/mounting_acc/power.htm





-----Original Message-----

From: calypte@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

To: ap-gto ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Thu, Nov 16, 2017 12:39 am

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.





"We��sell them. We use them also."

I assume you mean the Pyramid power supply. ��When I bought my Mach1 in early 2010, I also bought the Pyramid PS-9KX from Astro-Physics. ��I assumed that if A-P sold it, then it was probably dependable, and so it has proven to be during the almost 8 years I've had it. ��I have no complaints. ��A few years ago I read comments on CN that somebody had tested some of these, and they were putting out less than the claimed 12.8VDC. ��I tested mine a few minutes ago, and it's putting out 13.9 VDC, which I figure is close enough. ��One change I made is with the power cord for the mount. ��A dog chewed up the cigarette-lighter plug, so I took theopportunity to strip the wires and install spade lugs to use the screw terminals on the Pyramid. ��I duly note the comment about a Pyramid suddenly spiking to 22 volts. ��I'll stay alert for any anomalies.



----------------------------

#59580 Nov 16, 2017

We sell both types.

I'vehad two Pyramid power supplies.�� The latest one turned out to be "bad" outof the box.��

You didn't buy that one from us. We buy the Pyramids directly from the manufacturer and have never had a problem with any of them. There may be some bootleg power supplies out there on e-Bay or Amazon, I don't know, but we don't sell bootleg stuff.





Rolando





-----Original Message-----

From: 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

To: ap-gto ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Thu, Nov 16, 2017 1:25 am

Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.





Actually I believe Roland was referring to the Powerwerx variable outputPS which AP also sells.�� That's the one the thread wasdiscussing.��I'vehad two Pyramid power supplies.�� The latest one turned out to be "bad" outof the box.�� It fried some cables and smoked a monitor.�� I sent it toHawaii for Christopher to examine and he said it was working OK, but quitewarm.�� He said he wouldn't draw any more than 4 amps from it, even thoughit's rated at 10 amps.�� My older one (exact same model) was working finewhen I lost confidence in the brand and replaced it with a Powerwerx variableoutput one.��Woody��

-----Original Message-----

From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com]

Sent:Wednesday, November 15, 2017 10:40 PM

To:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.





��"We��sell them. We use themalso."



I assume youmean the Pyramid power supply. ��When I bought my Mach1 in early 2010, Ialso bought the Pyramid PS-9KX from Astro-Physics. ��I assumed that if A-Psold it, then it was probably dependable, and so it has proven to be duringthe almost 8 years I've had it. ��I have no complaints. ��A few yearsago I read comments on CN that somebody had tested some of these, and theywere putting out less than the claimed 12.8VDC. ��I tested mine a fewminutes ago, and it's putting out 13.9 VDC, which I figure is close enough.��One change I made is with the power cord for the mount. ��A dogchewed up the cigarette-lighter plug, so ! I took the opportunity to strip thewires and install spade lugs to use the screw terminals on the Pyramid.��I duly note the comment about a Pyramid suddenly spiking to 22 volts.��I'll stay alert for any anomalies.



----------------------------

#59581 Nov 16, 2017

Andrew,�������� Thanks for the lead on the INTERVOLT .alternativeconverter..������ Nicely packaged, slim converter. I can see using it witha Rigrunner, on top of the OTA, but at 4x the price of the (also reliable andseemingly very popular), DROK . it would be much too expensive, especially insupplying multiple voltages.��Joe



----------------------------

#59583 Nov 16, 2017

There are lots of fake Pyramid power supplies out there in internet land. A clue is price. As with most things, you get what you pay for. ��I see quite a bit of banter on this thread. I see some suggesting that 12V should be the max. for astronomy equipment, but that is not quite correct. You can.t look at just voltage by itself. Almost all astronomy equipment was designed to run from 12V so you could run it from a big battery. BUT, a battery that measures only 12V is an almost dead battery. So, 12V almost never means a measured voltage of 12V. Normal range would be 12.9-13.8V on a freshly charged battery. ��Some confusing info here as well. Someone suggests that running a CCD Camera at higher than 12V causes excess heat. I.m doubtful about that. In fact, the camera itself uses almost no power and is normally a 5V buss which means there is a step-down power supply which just about all electronic devices use. The cooler on a CCD camera is what needs 12V and quite a lot of it. If you reduce voltage, current will go up and that is more damaging than voltage. ��There is a common misunderstanding about how electricity does its thing. The best analogy is water. It takes a combination of pressure (voltage) and flow (current) to do useful work. If you reduce the pressure (voltage) you need to increase flow (current) to compensate. For electricity, current is expressed in AMPS. Many electronic devices state a specification in .WATTS. which is a combination of voltage and current. Reducing voltage means current needs to go UP and that can do more damage to electronics than higher voltage will. Reducing voltage also means larger gauge wire is needed to handle the increased current. Lowering the voltage and keeping the same wire gauge can cause the higher current to create heat in the wire (or circuit board) itself. There.s a reason that those big overhead transmission wires carry voltage in the 10.s of thousand volts. To transmit only 110V the wire would need to be enormous and voltage at the far end would not be 110V anymore. ��Anyway, there is no reason why a proper, single power supply cannot operate all of your 12V equipment. The key is, it needs to supply enough current (amps) and some extra buffer helps. So a good rule of thumb is to add up the total current (amps) when all your gear is running at the same time, then double that when choosing how many amps your power supply needs to output. Things that produce heat (or cooling) using electricity needs quite a lot, so dew heaters and CCD coolers are going to be your biggest consumer. The mount doesn.t use much except during a high-speed slew. When looking at heaters, don.t be fooled by .energy efficiency.. A low watt heater can.t get the job done when the dew/frost is especially bad. More amps/watts = more heat when you need it. ��Gary Bennett ��

��From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: November 16, 2017 11:33 AMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.







----------------------------

#59584 Nov 16, 2017

ordered this with case..www.banggood.com/DP50V15A-DPS5015-Programmable-Supply-Power-Module-With-Integrated-Voltmeter-Ammeter-Color-Display-p-1072236.html?rmmds=detail-top-buytogether-auto&cur_warehouse=CN



----------------------------

#59588 Nov 16, 2017

I think you are making this way more complicated than it really is. ��My point is that when you see a reference to ���12V��� is almost always referencing voltage of a ���12V��� battery. And a 12V battery is more than 12V unless its almost dead. ��Take just about any AC-DC power supply you have around the house and measure the actual voltage. There will be a label that says ���12VDC��� but if you measure voltage you are more likely to see 12.9-16.0V. ��If you plan to power any of your gear in ���portable mode���, you will be using a battery which is going to be more than 12V. So, relax. It will be just fine. �� ��Gary Bennett ��bendun.net/photos.bendun.net/

��From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: November 16, 2017 4:32 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.



----------------------------

#59589 Nov 16, 2017

I design this stuff for a living and am just reporting thefacts.��What "12VDC" means��is actually way more complicated thanmost people assume.��12V lead acid batteries are actually 13.8V when fullycharged.�� That isn't true for any other battery��chemistry and it isn'ttrue for linear or switching 12V voltage regulators.��Whether or not a particular electronic device designed tooperate��with 12VDC input can also operate on 13.8VDC is always an openquestion that should be investigated before hooking it up to 13.8VDC.�� Theodds are that it will be fine but that isn't any sort of guarantee.�� Checkwith the device manufacturer first.��I hope this helps.����-Christopher EricksonObservatory engineerSummitKineticsWaikoloa, HI 96738www.summitkinetics.com

��



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Thursday, November 16, 201712:24 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto]Re: 12v power supply.



I think you aremaking this way more complicated than it really is. ��My point is thatwhen you see a reference to ���12V��� is almost always referencing voltage of a���12V��� battery. And a 12V battery is more than 12V unless its almostdead. ��Take just about anyAC-DC power supply you have around the house and measure the actual voltage.There will be a label that says ���12VDC��� but if you measure voltage you are morelikely to see 12.9-16.0V. ��If you plan topower any of your gear in ���portable mode���, you will be using a battery which isgoing to be more than 12V. So, relax. It will be justfine. �� ��GaryBennett ��bendun.net/photos.bendun.net/

��From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: November16, 2017 4:32 PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE:[ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.



----------------------------

#59590 Nov 16, 2017

Personally, I would never connect a Pyramid power supply to a very expensive mount of this caliber. ��Stick to the Powerwerx, Alinco or at least of this class. ��Save the Pyramid for your dew heaters.

Rick Kuntz M.S., C.C.T.cardiofuse@...cardiofuse observatory



----------------------------

#59593 Nov 16, 2017

Hey! Can you hear me back there?



----------------------------

#59630 Nov 20, 2017

I picked up on this thread late during a periodic review of this groups posts. I am quite interested in the discussion about operating electronics on 13.8V v/s 12V especially the FocusLynx hub since I operate mine on 13.8V. I noted your comment regarding your discussion with Jeff at Optec on the potential shortened life of the FocusLynx hub if operated at 13.8V. Below is Jeff's reply to my query on this question. I understand this applies to Optec only and does not necessarily apply to other manufactures.I hope this info is usefulCheesDon

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recall suggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to be honest.�� There will be a little more heat generated - usually by the voltage regulators in the circuit, but since we usually work at night in the relative cold this should not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would be measurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12 VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which is the product used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and 3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltage of�� 12 or 13.8-volts is passed directly onto the motors while the lower voltage circuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs.�� Operating the stepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them since most of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDC operation.In short, other than a little additional heat, you should no worries running our devices with standard battery voltages.

�� �� ��I hope this helps,.Jeff.

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recall suggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to be honest.�� There will be a little more heat generated - usually by the voltage regulators in the circuit, but since we usually work at night in the relative cold this should not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would be measurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12 VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which is the p roduct used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and 3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltage of�� 12 or 13.8-volts is passed directly onto the motors while the lower voltage circuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs.�� Operating the stepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them since most of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDC operation.In short, other than a little additional heat, you should no worries running our devices with standard battery voltages.

�� �� ��I hope this helps,.Jeff.







----------------------------

#59632 Nov 20, 2017

Don,��You'recorrect.�� I just went back and looked at my message from Jeff and he indeeddid say 13.8v would just generate some additional heat, but the higher voltageshould be OK.�� He wasn't the one who mentioned shortening the life of thedevice.�� That was a different manufacturer.�� I received two messagesregarding 13.8v at the same time from two manufacturers and got them mixedup.��Thankyou for your clarification and catching my error.��So itlooks like it's just the astro cameras that prefer 12v and don't "like" highervoltages.�� And yes,��most can perform and operate at 13.8v, but theyjust heat up more and don't cool as well.��Woody����

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Monday, November 20, 2017 10:33 AMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��I picked up on this thread late during a periodic review of this groupsposts. I am quite interested in the discussion about operating electronics on13.8V v/s 12V especially the FocusLynx hub since I operate mine on 13.8V. Inoted your comment regarding your discussion with Jeff at Optec on thepotential shortened life of the FocusLynx hub if operated at 13.8V. Below isJeff's reply to my query on this question. I understand this applies to Opteconly and does not necessarily apply to other manufactures.I hope this info is usefulCheesDon

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recallsuggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to be honest.��There will be a little more heat generated - usually by the voltage regulatorsin the circuit, but since we usually work at night in the relative cold t! hisshould not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would bemeasurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which isthe product used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltage of�� 12or 13.8-volts is passed directly onto the motors while the lower voltagecircuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs.�� Operating thestepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them sincemost of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDCoperation.In short, other than a little additionalheat, you should no worries running our devices with standard batteryvoltages.

�� �� ��I hope this helps,.Jeff.

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recallsuggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to be honest.��There will be a little more heat generated - usually by the voltage regulatorsin the circuit, but since we usually work at night in the relative cold thisshould not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would bemeasurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which isthe p roduct used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltage of�� 12or 13.8-volts is passed directly! onto the motors while the lower voltagecircuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs.�� Operating thestepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them sincemost of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDCoperation.In short, other than a little additionalheat, you should no worries running our devices with standard batteryvoltages.

�� �� ��I hope this helps,.Jeff.



----------------------------

#59636 Nov 20, 2017

Hi WoodyThanks for the reply. It was an interesting thread. Lots of good discussion! from some knowledgeable people.CheersDon��



----------------------------

#59637 Nov 20, 2017

Still think you guys are making this more complicated than needed.

Watts is Watts. Reducing voltage increases current (amps), so the result is the same.��

Using separate power sources means more wires, and for me, that is really something to worry about.

Gary Bennett

On Nov 20, 2017, at 3:10 PM, 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



��Don,��You'recorrect.�� I just went back and looked at my message from Jeff and he indeeddid say 13.8v would just generate some additional heat, but the higher voltageshould be OK.�� He wasn't the one who mentioned shortening the life of thedevice.�� That was a different manufacturer.�� I received two messagesregarding 13.8v at the same time from two manufacturers and got them mixedup.��Thankyou for your clarification and catching my error.��So itlooks like it's just the astro cameras that prefer 12v and don't "like" highervoltages.�� And yes,��most can perform and operate at 13.8v, but theyjust heat up more and don't cool as well.��Woody����

-----Original Message-----From:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent:Monday, November 20, 2017 10:33 AMTo:ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v powersupply.

��I picked up on this thread late during a periodic review of this groupsposts. I am quite interested in the discussion about operating electronics on13.8V v/s 12V especially the FocusLynx hub since I operate mine on 13.8V. Inoted your comment regarding your discussion with Jeff at Optec on thepotential shortened life of the FocusLynx hub if operated at 13.8V. Below isJeff's reply to my query on this question. I understand this applies to Opteconly and does not necessarily apply to other manufactures.I hope this info is usefulCheesDon

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recallsuggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to be honest.��There will be a little more heat generated - usually by the voltage regulatorsin the circuit, but since we usually work at night in the relative cold t! hisshould not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would bemeasurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which isthe product used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltage of�� 12or 13.8-volts is passed directly onto the motors while the lower voltagecircuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs.�� Operating thestepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them sincemost of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDCoperation.In short, other than a little additionalheat, you should no worries running our devices with standard batteryvoltages.

�� �� ��I hope this helps,.Jeff.

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recallsuggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to be honest.��There will be a little more heat generated - usually by the voltage regulatorsin the circuit, but since we usually work at night in the relative cold thisshould not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would bemeasurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which isthe p roduct used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltage of�� 12or 13.8-volts is passed directly! onto the motors while the lower voltagecircuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs.�� Operating thestepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them sincemost of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDCoperation.In short, other than a little additionalheat, you should no worries running our devices with standard batteryvoltages.

�� �� ��I hope this helps,.Jeff.







----------------------------

#59639 Nov 21, 2017

"Watts are watts" but not all voltage regulators are createdequal.��Classic linear regulators shed heat when regulating a highervoltage to a lower voltage.�� The bigger the voltage difference, the moreheat is shed.��Modern switching regulators use a completely different andhigher-efficiency method of regulating voltage without sheddingheat.����Quality switching regulators��are more expensive thanlinear regulators.��The less heat that is released in cameras or in the opticalpath of telescopes, the better.�� Higher efficiency voltage regulation isalso very desirable in off-grid observatories.��Yes, it would be nice if everyone designed their electronicwidgets with high-efficiency, wide-voltage-input-range, switching voltageregulators inside.�� Unfortunately that is actually rather rare itseems.�� Everyone tries to save a buck on things that the user doesn't seeor know to care about.�� That's the��down side of competition.�� Theonly company I have seen using high-efficiency, wide-input-voltage-range,switching voltage regulators inside their electronic widgets isAstro-Physics.��I will say again that anyone who wants to run their electronicwidgets with some kind of power source other than what the widget came with,should check with the widget's manufacturer first.�� That shouldn't take toomuch effort and is much less costly than��damaging your precious widgetsor��degrading your local seeing and astro pics with excessive andunnecessary camera and/or observatory heat.��Not to mention voiding widget warranties.����-Christopher EricksonObservatoryengineerSummit KineticsWaikoloa, HI 96738www.summitkinetics.com

��



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Monday, November 20, 2017 3:03PMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12vpower supply.



Stillthink you guys are making this more complicated than needed.

Watts is Watts. Reducing voltage increases current (amps), so the result isthe same.��

Using separate power sources means more wires, and for me, that is reallysomething to worry about.

Gary Bennett

On Nov 20, 2017, at 3:10 PM, 'Woody Schlom' woody@... [ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>wrote:

��Don,��You're correct.�� I just went back and looked at my messagefrom Jeff and he indeed did say 13.8v would just generate some additionalheat, but the higher voltage should be OK.�� He wasn't the one whomentioned shortening the life of the device.�� That was a differentmanufacturer.�� I received two messages regarding 13.8v at the same timefrom two manufacturers and got them mixed up.��Thank you for your clarification and catching myerror.��Soit looks like it's just the astro cameras that prefer 12v and don't "like"higher voltages.�� And yes,��most can perform and operate at 13.8v,but they just heat up more and don't cool as well.��Woody����

-----Original Message-----From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com]

Sent: Monday, November 20, 2017 10:33 AMTo: ap-gto@yahoogroups.comSubject:RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.

��I picked up on this thread late during a periodic review of this groupsposts. I am quite interested in the discussion about operating electronicson 13.8V v/s 12V especially the FocusLynx hub since I operate mine on 13.8V.I noted your comment regarding your discussion with Jeff at Optec on thepotential shortened life of the FocusLynx hub if operated at 13.8V. Below isJeff's reply to my query on this question. I understand this applies toOptec only and does not necessarily apply to other manufactures.I hope this info is usefulCheesDon

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recallsuggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to behonest.�� There will be a little more heat generated - usually by thevoltage regulators in the circuit, but since we usually work at night in therelative cold t! his should not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure ashortened lifespan would be measurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC systemcompared to 12 VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which isthe product used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltage of��12 or 13.8-volts is passed directly onto the motors while the lower voltagecircuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs.�� Operatingthe stepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect themsince most of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDCoperation.In short, other than a little additionalheat, you should no worries running our devices with standard batteryvoltages.

�� �� ��I hope this helps,Jeff.

Hi Don,Thanks for your note.�� I don't recallsuggesting the higher voltage would shorten equipment life to behonest.�� There will be a little more heat generated - usually by thevoltage regulators in the circuit, but since we usually work at night in therelative cold this should not be a real problem.�� I'm not sure ashortened lifespan would be measurable if you're running a 13.8 VDC systemcompared to 12 VDC.����

The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which isthe p roduct used by Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-voltand 3.3-volt components used in this circuit.�� The higher voltageof�� 12 or 13.8-volts is passed directly! onto the motors while thelower voltage circuits operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboardICs.�� Operating the stepper motors at 13.8 volts or higher should notadversely affect them since most of the Nippon motors we use are designedand rated for 24 VDC operation.In short, other than a little additionalheat, you should no worries running our devices with standard batteryvoltages.

�� �� ��I hope thishelps,Jeff.



----------------------------

#59640 Nov 21, 2017

I talked to Jeff in person a couple weeks ago about the same thing. He

personally fixed my lynx control box while I watched. = )

My thinking is "if I need to reduce to 12v" for my cameras. (ASI1600MM and

ASI290mm) why not run a lead to the lynx controller (to be safe).

I figure I'll feed my rig-runner with the 12v since that supplies all the

top mounted gear. (heater, lynx, 2 HSM motors, USB hub, two ASI cameras).

Then I ran my mounts lead from the 12v down to the new powersupply that I

just picked up which is 13.8 fixed.





.





On Mon, Nov 20, 2017 at 3:10 PM, 'Woody Schlom' woody@...

[ap-gto] ap-gto@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>

>

> Don,

>

> You're correct. I just went back and looked at my message from Jeff and

> he indeed did say 13.8v would just generate some additional heat, but the

> higher voltage should be OK. He wasn't the one who mentioned shortening

> the life of the device. That was a different manufacturer. I received two

> messages regarding 13.8v at the same time from two manufacturers and got

> them mixed up.

>

> Thank you for your clarification and catching my error.

>

> So it looks like it's just the astro cameras that prefer 12v and don't

> "like" higher voltages. And yes, most can perform and operate at 13.8v,

> but they just heat up more and don't cool as well.

>

> Woody

>

>

>

> -----Original Message-----

> *From:* ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com]

> *Sent:* Monday, November 20, 2017 10:33 AM

> *To:* ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

> *Subject:* RE: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power supply.

>

>

>

> I picked up on this thread late during a periodic review of this groups

> posts. I am quite interested in the discussion about operating electronics

> on 13.8V v/s 12V especially the FocusLynx hub since I operate mine on

> 13.8V. I noted your comment regarding your discussion with Jeff at Optec on

> the potential shortened life of the FocusLynx hub if operated at 13.8V.

> Below is Jeff's reply to my query on this question. I understand this

> applies to Optec only and does not necessarily apply to other manufactures.

> I hope this info is useful

> Chees

> Don

>

>

> Hi Don,

> Thanks for your note. I don't recall suggesting the higher voltage would

> shorten equipment life to be honest. There will be a little more heat

> generated - usually by the voltage regulators in the circuit, but since we

> usually work at night in the relative cold t! his should not be a real

> problem. I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would be measurable if you're

> running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12 VDC.

>

> The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which is the product used by

> Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and 3.3-volt

> components used in this circuit. The higher voltage of 12 or 13.8-volts

> is passed directly onto the motors while the lower voltage circuits operate

> the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs. Operating the stepper motors at

> 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them since most of the

> Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDC operation.

> In short, other than a little additional heat, you should no worries

> running our devices with standard battery voltages.

>

> I hope this helps,

> Jeff.

>

> Hi Don,

> Thanks for your note. I don't recall suggesting the higher voltage would

> shorten equipment life to be honest. There will be a little more heat

> generated - usually by the voltage regulators in the circuit, but since we

> usually work at night in the relative cold this should not be a real

> problem. I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would be measurable if you're

> running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12 VDC.

>

> The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which is the p roduct used by

> Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and 3.3-volt

> components used in this circuit. The higher voltage of 12 or 13.8-volts

> is passed directly! onto the motors while the lower voltage circuits

> operate the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs. Operating the stepper

> motors at 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them since most

> of the Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDC operation.

> In short, other than a little additional heat, you should no worries

> running our devices with standard battery voltages.

>

> I hope this helps,

> Jeff.

>

>

>

> Thanks for your note. I don't recall suggesting the higher voltage would

> shorten equipment life to be honest. There will be a little more heat

> generated - usually by the voltage regulators i! n the circuit, but since

> we usually work at night in the relative cold ! this should not be a real

> problem. I'm not sure a shortened lifespan would be measurable if you're

> running a 13.8 VDC system compared to 12 VDC.

>

> The FocusLynx hub, for instance, (which is the product used by

> Astro-Physics) has two voltage regulators for 5-volt and 3.3-volt

> components used in this circuit. The higher voltage of 12 or 13.8-volts

> is passed directly onto the motors while the lower voltage circuits operate

> the PIC, ethernet, and other onboard ICs. Operating the stepper motors at

> 13.8 volts or higher should not adversely affect them since most of the

> Nippon motors we use are designed and rated for 24 VDC operation.

> In short, other than a little additional heat, you should no worries

> running our devices with standard battery voltages.

>

> I hope this helps,

> Jeff.

>

>

>





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