Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1


Jun 15, 2011

 


----------------------------

#31935 Jun 15, 2011

Hi All,



I will be getting a new Mach1 soon from the new production run. I have been looking through the archives about power and am probably more confused than before. Talk of 14v or 12v, deep cycle, golf cart batteries, inverters, clean power, sine waves etc. I'm familiar with all of these but there seem to be a lot of opinions on what power is necessary.



My plan is to buy a deep cycle battery from Wal Mart, 75 or 100 amp hour. I also purchased the Kendrick alligator clip/12v socket that AP has on their website. The mount will be the only thing connected to the battery via this direct connection.



I just want to make sure this is okay to last a night of imaging. I know there was talk of the voltage drop in the cold or if the battery gets low but just running the Mach1 off a large battery should be fine right? After the night is done, I wuould plug the battery into the trickle charger for the next night.



The camera and laptop will be AC power.



Thanks all!



----------------------------

#31937 Jun 15, 2011

In a message dated 6/15/2011 10:54:19 AM Central Daylight Time,

marc_windrich@... writes:



> My plan is to buy a deep cycle battery from Wal Mart, 75 or 100 amp hour.

> I also purchased the Kendrick alligator clip/12v socket that AP has on

> their website. The mount will be the only thing connected to the battery via

> this direct connection.

>

> I just want to make sure this is okay to last a night of imaging. I know

> there was talk of the voltage drop in the cold or if the battery gets low

> but just running the Mach1 off a large battery should be fine right? After

> the night is done, I wuould plug the battery into the trickle charger for the

> next night.

>



That size battery would be more than enough to run the Mach1 for a week.



Rolando





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#31946 Jun 15, 2011

I wonder if another factor to consider is how long the battery would

take to safely recharge.

I would hate to miss a day, if after a few night's use, it took a couple of

days to get back into action. Perhaps have two, to alternate, would be

better, than just one vey large capacity unit. That would recharge faster,

while always having a backup.



Joe



----------------------------

#31948 Jun 15, 2011

I have a mount (Mach1 'next month'), and SBIG camera and a laptop. I also have a couple Kendrick dew heaters, which I turn on minimal if it looks like dew is a possibility.

.

I currently (pun intended) have.two.deep-cycle 75 AH batteries, but they have to last me 5 nights (star parties) and I think that will be close. I am thinking either of a small generator or a Brunton 62 watt solar panel to make sure I have plenty of juice.



Wayne Hixson, Stargazer



From: Harley Davidson astrocnc@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 1:06 PM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1





.

I use a Honda 2000 watt generator and it is quiet :)

www.hayesequipment.com/eu2000i.htm



tony

----- Original Message -----

From: Mark Acker

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Sent: Wednesday, June 15, 2011 12:04 PM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1



It's going to be fine. The laptop, in any scenario, will draw as much power as everything else combined.

My Wal Mart deep cycle is lower capacity than that and has no issues as long as I don't run the laptop off it at the same time. Curious though, if AC is available, why run some off AC and some off a battery?



Mark



--- On Wed, 6/15/11, Marcus marc_windrich@...> wrote:



From: Marcus marc_windrich@...>

Subject: [ap-gto] 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, June 15, 2011, 8:29 AM



Hi All,



I will be getting a new Mach1 soon from the new production run. I have been looking through the archives about power and am probably more confused than before. Talk of 14v or 12v, deep cycle, golf cart batteries, inverters, clean power, sine waves etc. I'm familiar with all of these but there seem to be a lot of opinions on what power is necessary.



My plan is to buy a deep cycle battery from Wal Mart, 75 or 100 amp hour. I also purchased the Kendrick alligator clip/12v socket that AP has on their website. The mount will be the only thing connected to the battery via this direct connection.



I just want to make sure this is okay to last a night of imaging. I know there was talk of the voltage drop in the cold or if the battery gets low but just running the Mach1 off a large battery should be fine right? After the night is done, I wuould plug the battery into the trickle charger for the next night.



The camera and laptop will be AC power.



Thanks all!



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#31949 Jun 15, 2011

Thanks everyone, that is what I wanted to hear :)



Mark, my SBIG and computer both came with AC adapters and I have a 3 outlet extension cord.



The mount was either buy a deep cycle battery which I could use remotely if need be, or buy the Pyramid inverter and then be tied to AC.



If my observing site changes, I may go all DC so I figured the battery would be a better option at the moment.



Would there be any issues in power draw if I eventually split the battery between the mount and the SBIG ST8300? According to SBIG, the camera draws 3 amps (most of it for cooling I assume)?



Thanks!

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, Mark Acker markacker@...> wrote:

>

> It's going to be fine... The laptop, in any scenario, will draw as much power as everything else combined.

> My Wal Mart deep cycle is lower capacity than that and has no issues as long as I don't run the laptop off it at the same time... Curious though, if AC is available, why run some off AC and some off a battery?

>

> Mark

>

> --- On Wed, 6/15/11, Marcus marc_windrich@...> wrote:

>

> From: Marcus marc_windrich@...>

> Subject: [ap-gto] 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

> Date: Wednesday, June 15, 2011, 8:29 AM

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> ..

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> Hi All,

>

>

>

> I will be getting a new Mach1 soon from the new production run. I have been looking through the archives about power and am probably more confused than before. Talk of 14v or 12v, deep cycle, golf cart batteries, inverters, clean power, sine waves etc. I'm familiar with all of these but there seem to be a lot of opinions on what power is necessary.

>

>

>

> My plan is to buy a deep cycle battery from Wal Mart, 75 or 100 amp hour. I also purchased the Kendrick alligator clip/12v socket that AP has on their website. The mount will be the only thing connected to the battery via this direct connection.

>

>

>

> I just want to make sure this is okay to last a night of imaging. I know there was talk of the voltage drop in the cold or if the battery gets low but just running the Mach1 off a large battery should be fine right? After the night is done, I wuould plug the battery into the trickle charger for the next night.

>

>

>

> The camera and laptop will be AC power.

>

>

>

> Thanks all!

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>







----------------------------

#31954 Jun 15, 2011

Once you intend to image where no AC power is available, you need to take a serious look at your power requirements. Add your amperage requirements, consider how you will charge (if at all while away from AC), decide if you will need separate batteries, then size and split your batteries appropriately.



Here's an example:



- You intend to image for 3 eight-hour nights and you won't have AC power, a generator, or solar panels to recharge your batteries.



- Consider the power needs for the mount (0.5A), CCD camera (3A), laptop (3A), and throw in another half amp for overhead. We'll assume the 7A for now, but if you use dew heaters or other devices/accessories, don't for get to include them.



- 3 nights x 8 hours = 24 hours

- 24 hours x 7 amps = 168 amp hours



In this scenario, you'll need about 200-210 amp/hours (taking into account the 80% rule of batteries that says you'll typically get 80% of its rated capacity before voltage drops too low to be useful).



Your actual power requirements in the above scenario can be a little less if you're conservative with laptop settings, don't push the CCD cooling too hard, slew minimally, etc. But it's better to over estimate than under estimate.



There are several possibilities at this point...



- Get two 100AH 12v batteries and connect them in parallel. You'll get 200AH and should be able to last all 3 nights without charging. Then charge when you get home.



- Get two 200+AH 6v batteries and connect them in series. And, again, charge when you get home.



- Get enough battery power to last just 1 or 2 nights and find a way to charge the batteries every day (solar or generator).



- Get enough battery power to handle the mount and camera, and a separate battery for the laptop. You could then get a 100AH 12v battery and a 60-80AH 12v battery, for example.



Then you need to decide if you'll truly power everything from the DC source or will you get an inverter... there's obviously a lot to consider if you want to do it right.



The other option is to skip the math, get whatever battery Sears or WalMart has on sale, and hope for the best. :-)



Enjoy.



Danny

www.californiastars.net/



--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Marcus" windrichme@...> wrote:

>

> Thanks everyone, that is what I wanted to hear :)

>

> Mark, my SBIG and computer both came with AC adapters and I have a 3 outlet extension cord.

>

> The mount was either buy a deep cycle battery which I could use remotely if need be, or buy the Pyramid inverter and then be tied to AC.

>

> If my observing site changes, I may go all DC so I figured the battery would be a better option at the moment.

>

> Would there be any issues in power draw if I eventually split the battery between the mount and the SBIG ST8300? According to SBIG, the camera draws 3 amps (most of it for cooling I assume)?

>

> Thanks!

>



----------------------------

#31963 Jun 16, 2011

Something to consider is that even deep cycle lead-acid batteries have longer lives if you don't discharge them fully. That is, running them at half their ampere-hour capacity will give them considerably longer lives than if you were to run them down to nearly complete discharge before recharging. So recharging them each day after use would be a good thing.



As to the time to recharge, it primarily depends upon what you have available to recharge them. If you have AC or a generator and a decent battery charger, you should be able to fully recharge a 100 amp-hr battery in 10 hours or so. If you are dependent upon a solar panel, then you have to figure the current it can provide -- perhaps a couple of amps max for a smaller panel. Two amps over 10 hours of sun will give you 20 amp-hrs; less once you figure the inefficiencies in the actual charging process.



Jim Simpson

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joe Z." J.Zeglinski@...> wrote:

>

> I wonder if another factor to consider is how long the battery would

> take to safely recharge.

> I would hate to miss a day, if after a few night's use, it took a couple of

> days to get back into action. Perhaps have two, to alternate, would be

> better, than just one vey large capacity unit. That would recharge faster,

> while always having a backup.

>

> Joe

>



----------------------------

#31965 Jun 16, 2011

Hi all,



Sounds like I should be good with the battery.



On a side note, if I got the Pyramid converter that is on the AP website as another option, can it be used outside?

I figure most people running AC have a permanent setup.

Can the pyramid be safely used outdoors? with condensation/dew building up on it over a long night, etc?



--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "marylandturbo" simpsonj@...> wrote:

>

> Something to consider is that even deep cycle lead-acid batteries have longer lives if you don't discharge them fully. That is, running them at half their ampere-hour capacity will give them considerably longer lives than if you were to run them down to nearly complete discharge before recharging. So recharging them each day after use would be a good thing.

>

> As to the time to recharge, it primarily depends upon what you have available to recharge them. If you have AC or a generator and a decent battery charger, you should be able to fully recharge a 100 amp-hr battery in 10 hours or so. If you are dependent upon a solar panel, then you have to figure the current it can provide -- perhaps a couple of amps max for a smaller panel. Two amps over 10 hours of sun will give you 20 amp-hrs; less once you figure the inefficiencies in the actual charging process.

>

> Jim Simpson

>

> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joe Z." J.Zeglinski@> wrote:

> >

> > I wonder if another factor to consider is how long the battery would

> > take to safely recharge.

> > I would hate to miss a day, if after a few night's use, it took a couple of

> > days to get back into action. Perhaps have two, to alternate, would be

> > better, than just one vey large capacity unit. That would recharge faster,

> > while always having a backup.

> >

> > Joe

> >

>







----------------------------

#31969 Jun 16, 2011

I bought a 33 AH Werker deep cycle battery from Batteries Plus. .After a night of use when I put my charger on it the charger shows the battery still has over 80% of its charge. .These are the batteries used for the scooter for disabled persons. .They are fairly light, and they do the job.

Alan

--- On Wed, 6/15/11, Marcus marc_windrich@...> wrote:



From: Marcus marc_windrich@...>

Subject: [ap-gto] 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Date: Wednesday, June 15, 2011, 1:29 PM



Hi All,



I will be getting a new Mach1 soon from the new production run. I have been looking through the archives about power and am probably more confused than before. Talk of 14v or 12v, deep cycle, golf cart batteries, inverters, clean power, sine waves etc. I'm familiar with all of these but there seem to be a lot of opinions on what power is necessary.



My plan is to buy a deep cycle battery from Wal Mart, 75 or 100 amp hour. I also purchased the Kendrick alligator clip/12v socket that AP has on their website. The mount will be the only thing connected to the battery via this direct connection.



I just want to make sure this is okay to last a night of imaging. I know there was talk of the voltage drop in the cold or if the battery gets low but just running the Mach1 off a large battery should be fine right? After the night is done, I wuould plug the battery into the trickle charger for the next night.



The camera and laptop will be AC power.



Thanks all!







---------------



To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#31972 Jun 16, 2011

I have everything converted to Anderson PowerPoles and use a West Mountain Radio distribution panel in the back of my truck run to a separate battery charged by alternator. Can't go wrong.





--Jeffrey

---------------

Jeffrey A. Steinberg

914-374-7503

On Jun 15, 2011, at 11:39 PM, "dannysperry" danny@...> wrote:



> Once you intend to image where no AC power is available, you need to take a serious look at your power requirements. Add your amperage requirements, consider how you will charge (if at all while away from AC), decide if you will need separate batteries, then size and split your batteries appropriately.

>

> Here's an example:

>

> - You intend to image for 3 eight-hour nights and you won't have AC power, a generator, or solar panels to recharge your batteries.

>

> - Consider the power needs for the mount (0.5A), CCD camera (3A), laptop (3A), and throw in another half amp for overhead. We'll assume the 7A for now, but if you use dew heaters or other devices/accessories, don't for get to include them.

>

> - 3 nights x 8 hours = 24 hours

> - 24 hours x 7 amps = 168 amp hours

>

> In this scenario, you'll need about 200-210 amp/hours (taking into account the 80% rule of batteries that says you'll typically get 80% of its rated capacity before voltage drops too low to be useful).

>

> Your actual power requirements in the above scenario can be a little less if you're conservative with laptop settings, don't push the CCD cooling too hard, slew minimally, etc. But it's better to over estimate than under estimate.

>

> There are several possibilities at this point...

>

> - Get two 100AH 12v batteries and connect them in parallel. You'll get 200AH and should be able to last all 3 nights without charging. Then charge when you get home.

>

> - Get two 200+AH 6v batteries and connect them in series. And, again, charge when you get home.

>

> - Get enough battery power to last just 1 or 2 nights and find a way to charge the batteries every day (solar or generator).

>

> - Get enough battery power to handle the mount and camera, and a separate battery for the laptop. You could then get a 100AH 12v battery and a 60-80AH 12v battery, for example.

>

> Then you need to decide if you'll truly power everything from the DC source or will you get an inverter... there's obviously a lot to consider if you want to do it right.

>

> The other option is to skip the math, get whatever battery Sears or WalMart has on sale, and hope for the best. :-)

>

> Enjoy.

>

> Danny

> www.californiastars.net/

>

> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Marcus" windrichme@...> wrote:

> >

> > Thanks everyone, that is what I wanted to hear :)

> >

> > Mark, my SBIG and computer both came with AC adapters and I have a 3 outlet extension cord.

> >

> > The mount was either buy a deep cycle battery which I could use remotely if need be, or buy the Pyramid inverter and then be tied to AC.

> >

> > If my observing site changes, I may go all DC so I figured the battery would be a better option at the moment.

> >

> > Would there be any issues in power draw if I eventually split the battery between the mount and the SBIG ST8300? According to SBIG, the camera draws 3 amps (most of it for cooling I assume)?

> >

> > Thanks!

> >

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#31975 Jun 17, 2011

Can the pyramid be safely used outdoors? with condensation/dew building

up on it over a long night, etc?



I would also advise against it. However (do as I tell you, not as I do), I

do use similar supply outdoors. The trick is to get it into a large plastic

toolbox, which will insulate it from dew, rain, snow or moisture on the

ground. When connected, and on, you simply leave the cover slightly open to

allow air circulate



Actually, I am using a large toolbox in which I do keep a couple of power

supplies along USB hub, USB to RS232 converters, Robofocus unit and more. A

bundle of cables goes to the mount (RS232, power), another to the scope

(dew heater, USB, Robofocus, camera power), an USB cable to PC and power

cord. All cables are permanently connected inside the box and are stored

inside when in transport - convenient.



CS



Pawel Lancucki



----------------------------

#31976 Jun 17, 2011

As in RigRunner?. I have exactly the same setup.. It's wonderful.. So happy I converted everything over.

This setup makes it all but impossible for something to be unplugged accidentally.. It also means I can power everything from a battery or A/C with no other changes required.. Whichever one is the power source gets plugged in to the RR and off I go.. Sweet!



Mark

--- On Fri, 6/17/11, Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...> wrote:



From: Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...>

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1

To: "ap-gto@yahoogroups.com" ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Date: Friday, June 17, 2011, 12:26 AM

































.



















I have everything converted to Anderson PowerPoles and use a West Mountain Radio distribution panel in the back of my truck run to a separate battery charged by alternator. Can't go wrong.







--Jeffrey



---------------



Jeffrey A. Steinberg



914-374-7503







On Jun 15, 2011, at 11:39 PM, "dannysperry" danny@...> wrote:







> Once you intend to image where no AC power is available, you need to take a serious look at your power requirements. Add your amperage requirements, consider how you will charge (if at all while away from AC), decide if you will need separate batteries, then size and split your batteries appropriately.



>



> Here's an example:



>



> - You intend to image for 3 eight-hour nights and you won't have AC power, a generator, or solar panels to recharge your batteries.



>



> - Consider the power needs for the mount (0.5A), CCD camera (3A), laptop (3A), and throw in another half amp for overhead. We'll assume the 7A for now, but if you use dew heaters or other devices/accessories, don't for get to include them.



>



> - 3 nights x 8 hours = 24 hours



> - 24 hours x 7 amps = 168 amp hours



>



> In this scenario, you'll need about 200-210 amp/hours (taking into account the 80% rule of batteries that says you'll typically get 80% of its rated capacity before voltage drops too low to be useful).



>



> Your actual power requirements in the above scenario can be a little less if you're conservative with laptop settings, don't push the CCD cooling too hard, slew minimally, etc. But it's better to over estimate than under estimate.



>



> There are several possibilities at this point...



>



> - Get two 100AH 12v batteries and connect them in parallel. You'll get 200AH and should be able to last all 3 nights without charging. Then charge when you get home.



>



> - Get two 200+AH 6v batteries and connect them in series. And, again, charge when you get home.



>



> - Get enough battery power to last just 1 or 2 nights and find a way to charge the batteries every day (solar or generator).



>



> - Get enough battery power to handle the mount and camera, and a separate battery for the laptop. You could then get a 100AH 12v battery and a 60-80AH 12v battery, for example.



>



> Then you need to decide if you'll truly power everything from the DC source or will you get an inverter... there's obviously a lot to consider if you want to do it right.



>



> The other option is to skip the math, get whatever battery Sears or WalMart has on sale, and hope for the best. :-)



>



> Enjoy.



>



> Danny



> www.californiastars.net/



>



> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Marcus" windrichme@...> wrote:



> >



> > Thanks everyone, that is what I wanted to hear :)



> >



> > Mark, my SBIG and computer both came with AC adapters and I have a 3 outlet extension cord.



> >



> > The mount was either buy a deep cycle battery which I could use remotely if need be, or buy the Pyramid inverter and then be tied to AC.



> >



> > If my observing site changes, I may go all DC so I figured the battery would be a better option at the moment.



> >



> > Would there be any issues in power draw if I eventually split the battery between the mount and the SBIG ST8300? According to SBIG, the camera draws 3 amps (most of it for cooling I assume)?



> >



> > Thanks!



> >



>



>







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]























































[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#31977 Jun 17, 2011

I organize my cables, power strip, USB hub, robo, etc, in a plastic battery

box out in the field. However the pyramid and camera power supplies are

outside when they are being used. The generate enough heat to keep them dry

from what I have found, even in the humid southeast US. At the end of the

night I stick them back in the battery box where any residual heat helps dry

out any moisture.



Dean



----- Original Message -----

From: "Pawel T. Lancucki" pawel.lancucki@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Friday, June 17, 2011 9:00 AM

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1





>

> > Can the pyramid be safely used outdoors? with condensation/dew building

> up on it over a long night, etc?

>

> I would also advise against it. However (do as I tell you, not as I do), I

> do use similar supply outdoors. The trick is to get it into a large

plastic

> toolbox, which will insulate it from dew, rain, snow or moisture on the

> ground. When connected, and on, you simply leave the cover slightly open

to

> allow air circulate

>

> Actually, I am using a large toolbox in which I do keep a couple of power

> supplies along USB hub, USB to RS232 converters, Robofocus unit and more.

A

> bundle of cables goes to the mount (RS232, power), another to the scope

> (dew heater, USB, Robofocus, camera power), an USB cable to PC and power

> cord. All cables are permanently connected inside the box and are stored

> inside when in transport - convenient.

>

> CS

>

> Pawel Lancucki

>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>



----------------------------

#31983 Jun 17, 2011

Yes, rigrunner (I am a ham also). For critical joints, get the plastic clips to tie the together. I tripped and pulled mount power once. Www.qsradio.com sells them.





--Jeffrey

---------------

Jeffrey A. Steinberg

914-374-7503

On Jun 17, 2011, at 9:25 AM, Mark Acker markacker@...> wrote:



> As in RigRunner? I have exactly the same setup. It's wonderful. So happy I converted everything over.

> This setup makes it all but impossible for something to be unplugged accidentally. It also means I can power everything from a battery or A/C with no other changes required. Whichever one is the power source gets plugged in to the RR and off I go. Sweet!

>

> Mark

>

> --- On Fri, 6/17/11, Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...> wrote:

>

> From: Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...>

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1

> To: "ap-gto@yahoogroups.com" ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Date: Friday, June 17, 2011, 12:26 AM

>

>

>

> I have everything converted to Anderson PowerPoles and use a West Mountain Radio distribution panel in the back of my truck run to a separate battery charged by alternator. Can't go wrong.

>

> --Jeffrey

>

---------------

>

> Jeffrey A. Steinberg

>

> 914-374-7503

>

> On Jun 15, 2011, at 11:39 PM, "dannysperry" danny@...> wrote:

>

> > Once you intend to image where no AC power is available, you need to take a serious look at your power requirements. Add your amperage requirements, consider how you will charge (if at all while away from AC), decide if you will need separate batteries, then size and split your batteries appropriately.

>

> >

>

> > Here's an example:

>

> >

>

> > - You intend to image for 3 eight-hour nights and you won't have AC power, a generator, or solar panels to recharge your batteries.

>

> >

>

> > - Consider the power needs for the mount (0.5A), CCD camera (3A), laptop (3A), and throw in another half amp for overhead. We'll assume the 7A for now, but if you use dew heaters or other devices/accessories, don't for get to include them.

>

> >

>

> > - 3 nights x 8 hours = 24 hours

>

> > - 24 hours x 7 amps = 168 amp hours

>

> >

>

> > In this scenario, you'll need about 200-210 amp/hours (taking into account the 80% rule of batteries that says you'll typically get 80% of its rated capacity before voltage drops too low to be useful).

>

> >

>

> > Your actual power requirements in the above scenario can be a little less if you're conservative with laptop settings, don't push the CCD cooling too hard, slew minimally, etc. But it's better to over estimate than under estimate.

>

> >

>

> > There are several possibilities at this point...

>

> >

>

> > - Get two 100AH 12v batteries and connect them in parallel. You'll get 200AH and should be able to last all 3 nights without charging. Then charge when you get home.

>

> >

>

> > - Get two 200+AH 6v batteries and connect them in series. And, again, charge when you get home.

>

> >

>

> > - Get enough battery power to last just 1 or 2 nights and find a way to charge the batteries every day (solar or generator).

>

> >

>

> > - Get enough battery power to handle the mount and camera, and a separate battery for the laptop. You could then get a 100AH 12v battery and a 60-80AH 12v battery, for example.

>

> >

>

> > Then you need to decide if you'll truly power everything from the DC source or will you get an inverter... there's obviously a lot to consider if you want to do it right.

>

> >

>

> > The other option is to skip the math, get whatever battery Sears or WalMart has on sale, and hope for the best. :-)

>

> >

>

> > Enjoy.

>

> >

>

> > Danny

>

> > www.californiastars.net/

>

> >

>

> > --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Marcus" windrichme@...> wrote:

>

> > >

>

> > > Thanks everyone, that is what I wanted to hear :)

>

> > >

>

> > > Mark, my SBIG and computer both came with AC adapters and I have a 3 outlet extension cord.

>

> > >

>

> > > The mount was either buy a deep cycle battery which I could use remotely if need be, or buy the Pyramid inverter and then be tied to AC.

>

> > >

>

> > > If my observing site changes, I may go all DC so I figured the battery would be a better option at the moment.

>

> > >

>

> > > Would there be any issues in power draw if I eventually split the battery between the mount and the SBIG ST8300? According to SBIG, the camera draws 3 amps (most of it for cooling I assume)?

>

> > >

>

> > > Thanks!

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> >

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#31990 Jun 19, 2011

They also sell black/red bonded connectors for 1/2 side of the connection. With the large connector, nothing is pulling them apart.



John has great customer service too. No interest, just happy camper. Check out power supply at www.PowerWerx.com with powerful output!





--Jeffrey

---------------

Jeffrey A. Steinberg

914-374-7503

On Jun 18, 2011, at 2:03 PM, Mark Acker markacker@...> wrote:



> Thanks for the site Jeffrey. I was not aware of these guys. I welded the poles together by other means, but the clips are a great addon.

>

> Mark

>

> --- On Fri, 6/17/11, Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...> wrote:

>

> From: Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...>

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1

> To: "ap-gto@yahoogroups.com" ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Date: Friday, June 17, 2011, 9:21 PM

>

>

>

> Yes, rigrunner (I am a ham also). For critical joints, get the plastic clips to tie the together. I tripped and pulled mount power once. Www.qsradio.com sells them.

>

> --Jeffrey

>

---------------

>

> Jeffrey A. Steinberg

>

> 914-374-7503

>

> On Jun 17, 2011, at 9:25 AM, Mark Acker markacker@...> wrote:

>

> > As in RigRunner? I have exactly the same setup. It's wonderful. So happy I converted everything over.

>

> > This setup makes it all but impossible for something to be unplugged accidentally. It also means I can power everything from a battery or A/C with no other changes required. Whichever one is the power source gets plugged in to the RR and off I go. Sweet!

>

> >

>

> > Mark

>

> >

>

> > --- On Fri, 6/17/11, Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...> wrote:

>

> >

>

> > From: Jeffrey A. Steinberg jeffreys48.groups@...>

>

> > Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: 12v power and alligator clips for Mach1

>

> > To: "ap-gto@yahoogroups.com" ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>

> > Date: Friday, June 17, 2011, 12:26 AM

>

> >

>

> >

>

> >

>

> > I have everything converted to Anderson PowerPoles and use a West Mountain Radio distribution panel in the back of my truck run to a separate battery charged by alternator. Can't go wrong.

>

> >

>

> > --Jeffrey

>

> >

>

---------------

>

> >

>

> > Jeffrey A. Steinberg

>

> >

>

> > 914-374-7503

>

> >

>

> > On Jun 15, 2011, at 11:39 PM, "dannysperry" danny@...> wrote:

>

> >

>

> > > Once you intend to image where no AC power is available, you need to take a serious look at your power requirements. Add your amperage requirements, consider how you will charge (if at all while away from AC), decide if you will need separate batteries, then size and split your batteries appropriately.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > Here's an example:

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > - You intend to image for 3 eight-hour nights and you won't have AC power, a generator, or solar panels to recharge your batteries.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > - Consider the power needs for the mount (0.5A), CCD camera (3A), laptop (3A), and throw in another half amp for overhead. We'll assume the 7A for now, but if you use dew heaters or other devices/accessories, don't for get to include them.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > - 3 nights x 8 hours = 24 hours

>

> >

>

> > > - 24 hours x 7 amps = 168 amp hours

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > In this scenario, you'll need about 200-210 amp/hours (taking into account the 80% rule of batteries that says you'll typically get 80% of its rated capacity before voltage drops too low to be useful).

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > Your actual power requirements in the above scenario can be a little less if you're conservative with laptop settings, don't push the CCD cooling too hard, slew minimally, etc. But it's better to over estimate than under estimate.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > There are several possibilities at this point...

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > - Get two 100AH 12v batteries and connect them in parallel. You'll get 200AH and should be able to last all 3 nights without charging. Then charge when you get home.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > - Get two 200+AH 6v batteries and connect them in series. And, again, charge when you get home.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > - Get enough battery power to last just 1 or 2 nights and find a way to charge the batteries every day (solar or generator).

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > - Get enough battery power to handle the mount and camera, and a separate battery for the laptop. You could then get a 100AH 12v battery and a 60-80AH 12v battery, for example.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > Then you need to decide if you'll truly power everything from the DC source or will you get an inverter... there's obviously a lot to consider if you want to do it right.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > The other option is to skip the math, get whatever battery Sears or WalMart has on sale, and hope for the best. :-)

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > Enjoy.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > Danny

>

> >

>

> > > www.californiastars.net/

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Marcus" windrichme@...> wrote:

>

> >

>

> > > >

>

> >

>

> > > > Thanks everyone, that is what I wanted to hear :)

>

> >

>

> > > >

>

> >

>

> > > > Mark, my SBIG and computer both came with AC adapters and I have a 3 outlet extension cord.

>

> >

>

> > > >

>

> >

>

> > > > The mount was either buy a deep cycle battery which I could use remotely if need be, or buy the Pyramid inverter and then be tied to AC.

>

> >

>

> > > >

>

> >

>

> > > > If my observing site changes, I may go all DC so I figured the battery would be a better option at the moment.

>

> >

>

> > > >

>

> >

>

> > > > Would there be any issues in power draw if I eventually split the battery between the mount and the SBIG ST8300? According to SBIG, the camera draws 3 amps (most of it for cooling I assume)?

>

> >

>

> > > >

>

> >

>

> > > > Thanks!

>

> >

>

> > > >

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

> >

>

> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

> >

>

> >

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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