RE: [ap-gto] 12v DC power supply question


Oct 28, 2006

 


----------------------------

#16226 Oct 28, 2006

I'm putting the power panel into the observatory this weekend, and

thinking about a permanent 12V power supply. Are there any favorite

manufacturers to consider or products people are having good luck with?



I imagine I would want to keep the low voltage cabling as short as

possible, so I would guess the typical path is to bolt the DC power

supply to the pier as opposed to running 12V power all the way from

the observatory wall?



The AP website says " 2 amps with both motors slewing ", looking at

some power supplies I see this one which is capable of 3.75 amps

www.trcelectronics.com/sunny/sys1183-4512-t2.shtml which looks

easily adaptable to the GTO.



But I would prefer a known high quality brand when feeding such an

expensive mount, and I have never heard of TRC or much of anyone else.



Any tips? Surely many of you must have permanently powered mountings.



Mike Clemens



----------------------------

#16230 Oct 30, 2006

In a message dated 10/28/2006 10:55:31 PM Central Standard Time,

mike@... writes:



> But I would prefer a known high quality brand when feeding such an

> expensive mount, and I have never heard of TRC or much of anyone else.

>

> Any tips? Surely many of you must have permanently powered mountings.

>

> Mike Clemens



There will be a new high power supply on our web site tomorrow. Our staff has

been swamped with stuff and we have not gotton to that project. I have

testind this supply and it will do the job.



Rolando





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#16232 Oct 30, 2006

Mike, if you have a ham radio shop in your area you might want to

check out what they have in stock. All of my ham gear is powered by

12 volt power supplies. Anything suitable for ham gear would most

definitely be suitable for powering your mount. I use a 30 amp

Astron linear power supply that cost me about $150. However, if you

are only planning to run the mount with the power supply, then you

will be able to get by with a much smaller power supply.



The nice thing about ham radio power supplies, especially the

switching ones, is that extra care is taken in the deisgn to limit

noise in the output.



IHTH,



Dean Jacobsen

www.astrophoto.net

W6DBJ

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Mike" mike@...> wrote:

>

> I'm putting the power panel into the observatory this weekend, and

> thinking about a permanent 12V power supply. Are there any

favorite

> manufacturers to consider or products people are having good luck

with?

>

> I imagine I would want to keep the low voltage cabling as short as

> possible, so I would guess the typical path is to bolt the DC

power

> supply to the pier as opposed to running 12V power all the way

from

> the observatory wall?

>

> The AP website says " 2 amps with both motors slewing ", looking

at

> some power supplies I see this one which is capable of 3.75 amps

> www.trcelectronics.com/sunny/sys1183-4512-t2.shtml which

looks

> easily adaptable to the GTO.

>

> But I would prefer a known high quality brand when feeding such an

> expensive mount, and I have never heard of TRC or much of anyone

else.

>

> Any tips? Surely many of you must have permanently powered

mountings.

>

> Mike Clemens

>



----------------------------

#16237 Oct 31, 2006

Mike

Did you notice that the Iota supply is only good to 32F?



Richard









At 06:19 AM 10/31/2006 +0000, you wrote:

>Thanks for the suggestion, Dean. There are some radio shops around

>the area I believe, at least within 100 miles.

>

>Right now I'll wait for AP to describe their options, I see a hint

>of a 15V supply which may be appropriate for my cold location. This

>one will be my backup plan right now:

>

>www.iotaengineering.com/dlm15.htm>www.iotaengineering.com/dlm15.htm

>

>Mike Clemens

>BK7F2

>(ok just kidding I dont have a radio handle, thats my license plate

>on my rusty old truck)

>

> >

> > Mike, if you have a ham radio shop in your area you might want to

> > check out what they have in stock. All of my ham gear is powered

>by

> > 12 volt power supplies. Anything suitable for ham gear would most

> > definitely be suitable for powering your mount. I use a 30 amp

> > Astron linear power supply that cost me about $150. However, if

>you

> > are only planning to run the mount with the power supply, then you

> > will be able to get by with a much smaller power supply.

> >

> > The nice thing about ham radio power supplies, especially the

> > switching ones, is that extra care is taken in the deisgn to limit

> > noise in the output.

> >

> > IHTH,

> >

> > Dean Jacobsen

> > www.astrophoto.net

> > W6DBJ

>

>





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#16248 Nov 2, 2006

There will be a new high power supply on our web site tomorrow. Our

staff has > been swamped with stuff and we have not gotton to that project. I

have > testind this supply and it will do the job.

>

> Rolando

>





Hi Roland, I take it the PS15V10A "15 Volt DC - 10 Amp Regulated Power

Supply " would be your recommendation for an Alaskan observatory? Is

that the new high power supply you are referencing?



Thanks

Mike Clemens



----------------------------

#21324 Mar 17, 2008

I have the 5 amp just for my dew heaters.



This one runs the mount.



radioproshop.com/pyramid-ps/ps15kx.htm















Scott Hammonds



www.creatorsview.com



---------------







From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of

r1300rs

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 9:14 AM

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Subject: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply







I currently use a Pyramid 5 amp, 12-15 volt power supply that has one

cigarette adapter inlet

along with one set of power posts that plugs into my AC source. Last night,

with my dew

heaters cooking along the power supply overheated and shut everything down

via the built in

protection circuit.



I would think that 5 amps (7 amp surge) would be plenty to run 4 dew heaters

(main scope,

finder, guidescope, telrad).



I was wondering what every else used for a DC source. I did have a cigarette

"y" splitter with

one leg to the scope and the other to the dew controller. Maybe it was bad

or had a high

resistance.



Thanks; maybe I need to upgrade.











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#21325 Mar 17, 2008

Hi Scott,



I too am about to upgrade my 5 amp Pyramid to a 10 amp. But then I wondered

if even that would be enough to run both an AP-900, and some dew heaters -

maybe 4 of these, as well.



What mount do you power with the 10 amp, and does it power anything

else, like cameras etc. ?

Why do you allocate the 10 amp unit just for the mount - would dew heaters

bring it to it's limits?



Thanks for any further advice,

Joe

----- Original Message -----

From: "Scott Hammonds" shammo@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 9:01 AM

Subject: RE: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





>I have the 5 amp just for my dew heaters.

>

> This one runs the mount.

>

> radioproshop.com/pyramid-ps/ps15kx.htm

>



> Scott Hammonds

>

> www.creatorsview.com

>

---------------

>



----------------------------

#21326 Mar 17, 2008

Hi,



One of the things I worry about is using the Pyramid out in the open

night air, especially in heavy dew.

My thinking is that night dew, or the hot power supply melting snow or ice

crystals, might drip water, through the vents on top, onto the power

circuits inside, causing a short, and shutting down the supply caused by an

"internal" power drain.



Was your Pyramid, housed or protected in some way?



Joe

----- Original Message -----

From: "r1300rs" cardiofuse@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 8:14 AM

Subject: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





>I currently use a Pyramid 5 amp, 12-15 volt power supply that has one

>cigarette adapter inlet

> along with one set of power posts that plugs into my AC source. Last

> night, with my dew

> heaters cooking along the power supply overheated and shut everything down

> via the built in

> protection circuit.

>

> I would think that 5 amps (7 amp surge) would be plenty to run 4 dew

> heaters (main scope,

> finder, guidescope, telrad).

>

> I was wondering what every else used for a DC source. I did have a

> cigarette "y" splitter with

> one leg to the scope and the other to the dew controller. Maybe it was

> bad or had a high

> resistance.

>

> Thanks; maybe I need to upgrade.

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>



----------------------------

#21327 Mar 17, 2008

I was thinking it might be better to have 2 of the 5amp supplies and keep

the dew heaters seperate from the mount?



Anyone tried the Radio Shack solid state power supplies? I would like

something smaller and lighter for field use as the regular ones are pretty

heavy.



Dean



----- Original Message -----

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:18 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





> Hi Scott,

>

> I too am about to upgrade my 5 amp Pyramid to a 10 amp. But then I

wondered

> if even that would be enough to run both an AP-900, and some dew heaters -

> maybe 4 of these, as well.

>

> What mount do you power with the 10 amp, and does it power anything

> else, like cameras etc. ?

> Why do you allocate the 10 amp unit just for the mount - would dew heaters

> bring it to it's limits?

>

> Thanks for any further advice,

> Joe

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Scott Hammonds" shammo@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 9:01 AM

> Subject: RE: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

>

> >I have the 5 amp just for my dew heaters.

> >

> > This one runs the mount.

> >

> > radioproshop.com/pyramid-ps/ps15kx.htm

> >

>

> > Scott Hammonds

> >

> > www.creatorsview.com

> >

---------------

> >

>

>

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----------------------------

#21328 Mar 17, 2008

HI Joe,



It might be overkill, but my setup is in a remote observatory and I didn't

want any chance of power issues.







I have the AP12000GTO on the 10amp. I have 2 dew heater straps on the 5amp.

My cameras run via direct ac hookup. Everything is backed up by a UPS

battery backup.



It gets REALLY dewy where we are, but the power supplies generate enough

heat to keep condensation off of them. I wouldn't worry about that issue.

However, at home where I use my Mach 1, I have both power supplies in a

wooden enclosure with a handle, but that is really for the convenience of

carrying. The cool, or warm, part of that wooden box is that I can put

eyepieces in there and they stay dew free. However, I have to admit, they

don't get used much. J







Dean, I do have a RadioShack power supply, first one I bought to use about 5

years ago and it ran the 1200 just fine.







Scott







Scott Hammonds



www.creatorsview.com



---------------







From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of

Joseph Zeglinski

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 11:19 AM

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply







Hi Scott,



I too am about to upgrade my 5 amp Pyramid to a 10 amp. But then I wondered

if even that would be enough to run both an AP-900, and some dew heaters -

maybe 4 of these, as well.



What mount do you power with the 10 amp, and does it power anything

else, like cameras etc. ?

Why do you allocate the 10 amp unit just for the mount - would dew heaters

bring it to it's limits?



Thanks for any further advice,

Joe

----- Original Message -----

From: "Scott Hammonds" shammo@... mailto:shammo%40bellsouth.net>

>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> >

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 9:01 AM

Subject: RE: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply



>I have the 5 amp just for my dew heaters.

>

> This one runs the mount.

>

> radioproshop.com/pyramid-ps/ps15kx.htm

>



> Scott Hammonds

>

> www.creatorsview.com

>

---------------

>











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



----------------------------

#21335 Mar 17, 2008

Scott:



Great and thoughtful link; I thought I search everywhere. I'm on it.



Still wondering about a smaller, solid state unit for the AP900 but probably wouldn't handle

the long term grind in the elements.



Best Regards,



Rick

cardiofuse observatory



----------------------------

#21337 Mar 17, 2008

Hi Joe M.



I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into one

of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way it

would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the plug

by hand!



To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs at

an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what I

would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the plugs

not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro hair

dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a very

small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord has

no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" - so it

will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket centre

pin - a breeze would disconnect power!



I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.



(1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the power

cord.

(2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

(3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs soldered

wire joint)

(4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

(5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent shorting

the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

(6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires to

the centre pin



Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch bundle

of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside the

body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the original

single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not melt

from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.



This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the "power

cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer depression.

The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.



I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were assembled,

but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of smaller

Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.



Hope this idea helps,

Joe Z.

----- Original Message -----

From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





> r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

>

> I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

> can

> back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One of

> your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

> faulty

> causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

> instead.

>







----------------------------

#21338 Mar 18, 2008

Rick, there's room, plenty of room with the 10-20acres to spread your

elbows. Should be fun breaking-in our second observing field...joe :)





"May You Go Among The Imperishable Stars"

Joe Mize www.cav-sfo.com

Chiefland Astronomy Village, Fla. ----- Original Message -----

From: "r1300rs" cardiofuse@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 8:51 PM

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





> Joe:

>

> Thanks for the great advice. I was thinking of the high ohm value of all

> the cigarette plugs (3

> total with the 'Y').

>

> I was also thinking of a smaller, solid state DC supply dedicated to the

> AP900; I was just

> wondering how "filtered" and durable it was. If not, I'll dedicate the 5

> amp Pyramid and grab

> another 10 amp for the dew heater control (4-straps being run).

>

> I see your CAV picnic is on the 5-8th; I'm in Panama City and was

> wondering if there was

> room for a tent in the back field (new member-great spot!)

>

> Best Regards,

>

> Rick

> cardiofuse observatory

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>



----------------------------

#21339 Mar 18, 2008

It's amazing how you only have to wait and someone will have "been there - done it" - no matter what issue or problem is raised !



I have been wrestling with the problem of a AC/DC power and popping cigarette lighter plugs thinking that I had been singled out by the universe for such treatment. But - as has been proven once again, you never travel alone.



Thanks for all the info in this thread.



Murray





Joseph Zeglinski J.Zeglinski@...> wrote: Hi Joe M.



I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into one

of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way it

would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the plug

by hand!



To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs at

an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what I

would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the plugs

not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro hair

dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a very

small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord has

no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" - so it

will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket centre

pin - a breeze would disconnect power!



I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.



(1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the power

cord.

(2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

(3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs soldered

wire joint)

(4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

(5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent shorting

the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

(6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires to

the centre pin



Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch bundle

of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside the

body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the original

single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not melt

from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.



This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the "power

cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer depression.

The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.



I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were assembled,

but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of smaller

Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.



Hope this idea helps,

Joe Z.

----- Original Message -----

From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply



> r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

>

> I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

> can

> back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One of

> your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

> faulty

> causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

> instead.

>













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#21341 Mar 18, 2008

I just ordered a couple of the 5 amp pyramid power supplies so that I can

keep the kendricks seperate from the mount. I found a great source on line

for these at $25 each. I'll be happy to forward the link via private e-mail

if you are interested.



Dean



----- Original Message -----

From: "Murray Hammick" mphammick@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 7:21 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





> It's amazing how you only have to wait and someone will have "been there -

done it" - no matter what issue or problem is raised !

>

> I have been wrestling with the problem of a AC/DC power and popping

cigarette lighter plugs thinking that I had been singled out by the universe

for such treatment. But - as has been proven once again, you never travel

alone.

>

> Thanks for all the info in this thread.

>

> Murray

>

>

> Joseph Zeglinski J.Zeglinski@...> wrote:

Hi Joe M.

>

> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

> tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into

one

> of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way

it

> would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

> significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the

plug

> by hand!

>

> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs at

> an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what I

> would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the

plugs

> not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro

hair

> dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

> lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a

very

> small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord

has

> no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" - so

it

> will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

> looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket

centre

> pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>

> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

> implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>

> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the power

> cord.

> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

soldered

> wire joint)

> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

> thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent

shorting

> the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires to

> the centre pin

>

> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch bundle

> of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside

the

> body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

original

> single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not

melt

> from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

> should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

> reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>

> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the "power

> cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

depression.

> The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>

> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were assembled,

> but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of

smaller

> Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>

> Hope this idea helps,

> Joe Z.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

> > r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

> >

> > I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

> > can

> > back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One

of

> > your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

> > faulty

> > causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

> > instead.

> >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>







----------------------------

#21342 Mar 18, 2008

Hi Murray,



Glad I could help out.



One other cause I forgot to mention about "cigarette lighter socket pop

out" is the cold weather we work in at night.

As the temperature drops, the power cords stiffen up in a matter of minutes.

When you push the plug into the socket, the plunger pin is now pressing down

not only on the centre pin spring (which is always quite soft), but worse,

it is pressing in the end of the even stiffer power lead inside the plug -

which is an icicle at this point. It is like pressing on a nail, so all you

really get is a "pin barely touching contact" at the socket centre post. If

it rattles, you get intermittent mount tracking or power loss indicators.

The battery or A/C power unit may be fine, but the plug's pin is frozen

stiff.



One other thing to look at ...



I noticed that when I took the tip off the "fused" type plug, and dumped

out the glass fuse and spring, that this spring was much "stronger" than my

other "non-fused" cigarette lighter plugs. The other difference, it looks

like the spring is "brass-like" (maybe copper or beryllium) which is I

suppose for better electrical contact with the fuse. When I pressed down on

a few of the fused plugs in the store bin, most were so stiff the plunger

barely moved - even without a power cord attached - while the non-fused ones

were quite soft. That is why I think it is worth immediately replacing the

springs in fused plugs.



Test it yourself.



The solution to this problem, for "fused plugs" is to buy another

"non-fused" plug and smash off the end tip to get at it's spring - and swap

it with the fused plug's. I suspect the non-fused spring is probably just

made from normal steel, but it should work with a glass fuse. Or, try a

spring from an old ball point pen cartridge, etc. which are much softer.



The reason for the breakage is that these kinds of plugs have their

spring encapsulated inside the tip, so you have to smash the plastic tip to

get at it. For $1.60 at a bulk electronics store, it is cheaper than

spending a lot of time and money at a hardware store, and even then not

being able to test the "packaged" spring's stiffness before purchase.



I just wish they would spend the extra two cents to make and assemble

cigarette lighter sockets properly - perhaps Roland at Astro Physics should

look into this "potential problem" for their power cords. The AP-900 plug

being non-fused, and with a thin (round) centre power lead inside , the plug

pin seems quite soft and responsive, so at least that cord shouldn't easily

walk out of a cigarette lighter socket.



Joe

----- Original Message -----

From: "Murray Hammick" mphammick@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 7:21 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





> It's amazing how you only have to wait and someone will have "been there -

> done it" - no matter what issue or problem is raised !

>

> I have been wrestling with the problem of a AC/DC power and popping

> cigarette lighter plugs thinking that I had been singled out by the

> universe for such treatment. But - as has been proven once again, you

> never travel alone.

>

> Thanks for all the info in this thread.

>

> Murray

>

>

> Joseph Zeglinski J.Zeglinski@...> wrote:

> Hi Joe M.

>

> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

> tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into

> one

> of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way

> it

> would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

> significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the plug

> by hand!

>

> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs at

> an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what I

> would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the

> plugs

> not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro hair

> dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

> lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a

> very

> small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord has

> no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" - so

> it

> will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

> looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket centre

> pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>

> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

> implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>

> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the power

> cord.

> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

> soldered

> wire joint)

> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

> thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent shorting

> the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires to

> the centre pin

>

> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch bundle

> of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside

> the

> body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

> original

> single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not melt

> from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

> should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

> reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>

> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the "power

> cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

> depression.

> The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>

> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were assembled,

> but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of smaller

> Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>

> Hope this idea helps,

> Joe Z.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

> > r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

> >

> > I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

> > can

> > back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One

> > of

> > your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

> > faulty

> > causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

> > instead.

> >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>







----------------------------

#21343 Mar 18, 2008

Thanks for the offer - but sadly I ordered a 12 amp unit yesterday which is alreday on its way to me.



My next problem is how to get a single laptop to run MaxDSLR and Orion's new autiguide software at the same time. I do not to run the AP900 mount via MaxDSLR - I think it is going to be much more complex - though I might have overestimated the problems. Might have to go to two computers.



Thanks again for the offer,



Murray





Dean S dean@...> wrote:

I just ordered a couple of the 5 amp pyramid power supplies so that I can

keep the kendricks seperate from the mount. I found a great source on line

for these at $25 each. I'll be happy to forward the link via private e-mail

if you are interested.



Dean

----- Original Message -----

From: "Murray Hammick" mphammick@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 7:21 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply



> It's amazing how you only have to wait and someone will have "been there -

done it" - no matter what issue or problem is raised !

>

> I have been wrestling with the problem of a AC/DC power and popping

cigarette lighter plugs thinking that I had been singled out by the universe

for such treatment. But - as has been proven once again, you never travel

alone.

>

> Thanks for all the info in this thread.

>

> Murray

>

>

> Joseph Zeglinski J.Zeglinski@...> wrote:

Hi Joe M.

>

> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

> tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into

one

> of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way

it

> would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

> significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the

plug

> by hand!

>

> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs at

> an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what I

> would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the

plugs

> not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro

hair

> dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

> lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a

very

> small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord

has

> no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" - so

it

> will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

> looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket

centre

> pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>

> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

> implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>

> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the power

> cord.

> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

soldered

> wire joint)

> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

> thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent

shorting

> the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires to

> the centre pin

>

> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch bundle

> of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside

the

> body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

original

> single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not

melt

> from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

> should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

> reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>

> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the "power

> cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

depression.

> The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>

> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were assembled,

> but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of

smaller

> Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>

> Hope this idea helps,

> Joe Z.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

> > r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

> >

> > I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

> > can

> > back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One

of

> > your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

> > faulty

> > causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

> > instead.

> >

>

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#21344 Mar 18, 2008

JoeZ, if going the rout of modifying the cigarette plug have you looked a

reducing the spring tension? When you reduce wire diameter resistance is

increased resulting in less current flow. Clipping off a turn of the spring

will lower its spring rate reducing the springs tendency of pushing the plug

out without increasing resistance. Just another thought...joe ;)





"May You Go Among The Imperishable Stars"

Joe Mize www.cav-sfo.com

Chiefland Astronomy Village, Fla. ----- Original Message -----

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 2:34 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





> Hi Joe M.

>

> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

> tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into

> one

> of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way

> it

> would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

> significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the plug

> by hand!

>

> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs at

> an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what I

> would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the

> plugs

> not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro hair

> dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

> lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a

> very

> small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord has

> no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" - so

> it

> will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

> looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket centre

> pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>

> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

> implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>

> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the power

> cord.

> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

> soldered

> wire joint)

> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

> thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent shorting

> the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires to

> the centre pin

>

> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch bundle

> of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside

> the

> body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

> original

> single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not melt

> from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

> should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

> reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>

> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the

> "power

> cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

> depression.

> The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>

> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were assembled,

> but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of smaller

> Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>

> Hope this idea helps,

> Joe Z.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

>

>> r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

>>

>> I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

>> can

>> back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One

>> of

>> your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

>> faulty

>> causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

>> instead.

>>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>



----------------------------

#21346 Mar 18, 2008

Hi,

I use the Pyramids outside all the time. I have just placed a small

board over it when it rained or snowed. Dew will not form on the top

due to internal heat. If you are worried, just take a plastic box or

trash can, cut some vent holes and place over the supply. I also set

the suppply up on a brick if it is raining.

Thanks, Rick



--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Hi,

>

> One of the things I worry about is using the Pyramid out in

the open > night air, especially in heavy dew.

> My thinking is that night dew, or the hot power supply melting

snow or ice > crystals, might drip water, through the vents on top, onto the

power > circuits inside, causing a short, and shutting down the supply

caused by an > "internal" power drain.

>

> Was your Pyramid, housed or protected in some way?

>

> Joe

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "r1300rs" cardiofuse@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 8:14 AM

> Subject: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

>

> >I currently use a Pyramid 5 amp, 12-15 volt power supply that has

one > >cigarette adapter inlet

> > along with one set of power posts that plugs into my AC source.

Last > > night, with my dew

> > heaters cooking along the power supply overheated and shut

everything down > > via the built in

> > protection circuit.

> >

> > I would think that 5 amps (7 amp surge) would be plenty to run 4

dew > > heaters (main scope,

> > finder, guidescope, telrad).

> >

> > I was wondering what every else used for a DC source. I did

have a > > cigarette "y" splitter with

> > one leg to the scope and the other to the dew controller. Maybe

it was > > bad or had a high

> > resistance.

> >

> > Thanks; maybe I need to upgrade.

> >

> >

---------------

> >

> > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

> >

> >

> >

>







----------------------------

#21350 Mar 18, 2008

A few years back I purchased a cigarette lighter jack that allows the

plug to "clip" in place, giving a good connection with both

conductors. This eliminated completely the problems I was having with

them constantly backing out.



Bryan



--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Hi Joe M.

>

> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter

plugs > tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it

into one > of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters.

No way it > would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required

a > significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into

the plug > by hand!

>

> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded

plugs at > an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were

what I > would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of

the plugs > not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the

RoadPro hair > dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded

cigarette > lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals,

inside a very > small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power

cord has > no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back

pressure" - so it > will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the

plug > looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket

centre > pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>

> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am

going to > implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>

> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the

power > cord.

> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

soldered > wire joint)

> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several

much > thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent

shorting > the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded

wires to > the centre pin

>

> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch

bundle > of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out"

inside the > body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

original > single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also

not melt > from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires,

there > should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally,

using a > reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>

> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by

the "power > cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

depression. > The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>

> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were

assembled, > but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of

smaller > Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>

> Hope this idea helps,

> Joe Z.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

>

> > r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

> >

> > I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette

plugs > > can

> > back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune

time. One of > > your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew

strips is > > faulty

> > causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding

posts > > instead.

> >

>



----------------------------

#21351 Mar 18, 2008

Thanks for the suggestion Joe M.



However, if I clip off one turn of the spring, it will now be a bit

shorter - so I might stretch it to push the centre pin to his original home

position. I suspect that the spring tension will not be significantly

changed by a single cut, and there aren't a lot of turns in the coil.



Then again, if we can consider each turn as a separate spring, and the

turns added in series, the new spring tension will not be the sum of the

tension of each turn, but the product of tensions (spring constants),

divided by the sums (as in calculating capacitors in parallel). This means

that just removing one turn of the spring may not significantly reduce the

tension of say a 5 or 6 turn spring - as I recall is used in the fused plug

version.

To make a significant change in the stiff spring you really need to change

the mass of the wire, while keeping the length the same. Otherwise you will

have a loose centre, without much change in tension.



I am going to have to think about and experiment with this.



Joe Z.

----- Original Message -----

From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 2:24 PM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





> JoeZ, if going the rout of modifying the cigarette plug have you looked a

> reducing the spring tension? When you reduce wire diameter resistance is

> increased resulting in less current flow. Clipping off a turn of the

> spring

> will lower its spring rate reducing the springs tendency of pushing the

> plug

> out without increasing resistance. Just another thought...joe ;)

>

>

> "May You Go Among The Imperishable Stars"

> Joe Mize www.cav-sfo.com

> Chiefland Astronomy Village, Fla.

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 2:34 AM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

>

>> Hi Joe M.

>>

>> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

>> tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

>> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into

>> one

>> of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way

>> it

>> would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

>> significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the

>> plug

>> by hand!

>>

>> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs

>> at

>> an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what I

>> would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the

>> plugs

>> not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro

>> hair

>> dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

>> lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a

>> very

>> small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord

>> has

>> no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" - so

>> it

>> will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

>> looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket

>> centre

>> pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>>

>> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

>> implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>>

>> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the power

>> cord.

>> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

>> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

>> soldered

>> wire joint)

>> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

>> thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

>> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent

>> shorting

>> the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

>> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires to

>> the centre pin

>>

>> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch bundle

>> of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside

>> the

>> body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

>> original

>> single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not

>> melt

>> from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

>> should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

>> reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>>

>> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the

>> "power

>> cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

>> depression.

>> The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>>

>> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were

>> assembled,

>> but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of

>> smaller

>> Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>>

>> Hope this idea helps,

>> Joe Z.

>>

>> ----- Original Message -----

>> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

>> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

>> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>>

>>

>>> r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

>>>

>>> I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

>>> can

>>> back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One

>>> of

>>> your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

>>> faulty

>>> causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

>>> instead.

>>>

>>

>>

---------------

>>

>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

>> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>>

>>

>>

>>

>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>







----------------------------

#21352 Mar 18, 2008

Thanks Rick,

That is good news to hear - I think I will go with the 10 amp then.



Joe

----- Original Message -----

From: "Rick Wiggins" rickwiggins@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 2:48 PM

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





> Hi,

> I use several Pyramid 10Amp supplies for several different setups

> and power the AP 1200 or 900 plus all dew heaters and occasionally a

> few other items. Plenty of power.

> Thanks, Rick

>

> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

> wrote:

>>

>> Hi Scott,

>>

>> I too am about to upgrade my 5 amp Pyramid to a 10 amp. But then I

> wondered

>> if even that would be enough to run both an AP-900, and some dew

> heaters -

>> maybe 4 of these, as well.

>>

>> What mount do you power with the 10 amp, and does it power

> anything

>> else, like cameras etc. ?

>> Why do you allocate the 10 amp unit just for the mount - would dew

> heaters

>> bring it to it's limits?

>>

>> Thanks for any further advice,

>> Joe

>>

>> ----- Original Message -----

>> From: "Scott Hammonds" shammo@...>

>> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 9:01 AM

>> Subject: RE: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>>

>>

>> >I have the 5 amp just for my dew heaters.

>> >

>> > This one runs the mount.

>> >

>> > radioproshop.com/pyramid-ps/ps15kx.htm

>> >

>>

>> > Scott Hammonds

>> >

>> > www.creatorsview.com

>> >

---------------

>> >

>>

>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>



----------------------------

#21353 Mar 18, 2008

Hi Bryan,



I was thinking about that approach as well - can you give us some more

detail about the manufacturer, etc.



One approach I had considered was to take a piece of thin copper

tubing - like the 1.25" chrome tubes used as sink tailpieces (the are also

great for 1.25 inch eyepiece tubes). My thought was to slit the tube and

insert it into a lighter socket part way down. It doesn't have to be very

long - just an internal collar at the point where the plug side springs come

to rest. This collar would act as a stopper, preventing the plug from easily

moving out, until you actually pull it out over that obstruction. However, I

decided that may not work because every DC power cord with its own plug is

different - the side springs vary in design, so the position of the copper

insert won't be the same for every plug. Some would stay in tightly, others

would still rattle, and possibly enough to disconnect anyway.



I would be interested in learning more about your socket. However, I

suspect that would only work for custom power supply designs, since units

like the Pyramid supply, can't be retrofitted with it - I assume.



Thanks,

Joe Z.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Bryan Henry" behenry10@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 4:05 PM

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





>A few years back I purchased a cigarette lighter jack that allows the

> plug to "clip" in place, giving a good connection with both

> conductors. This eliminated completely the problems I was having with

> them constantly backing out.

>

> Bryan

>

> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

> wrote:

>>

>> Hi Joe M.

>>

>> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter

> plugs

>> tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

>> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it

> into one

>> of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters.

> No way it

>> would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required

> a

>> significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into

> the plug

>> by hand!

>>

>> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded

> plugs at

>> an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were

> what I

>> would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of

> the plugs

>> not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the

> RoadPro hair

>> dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded

> cigarette

>> lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals,

> inside a very

>> small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power

> cord has

>> no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back

> pressure" - so it

>> will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the

> plug

>> looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket

> centre

>> pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>>

>> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am

> going to

>> implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>>

>> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the

> power

>> cord.

>> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

>> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

> soldered

>> wire joint)

>> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several

> much

>> thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

>> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent

> shorting

>> the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

>> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded

> wires to

>> the centre pin

>>

>> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch

> bundle

>> of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out"

> inside the

>> body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

> original

>> single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also

> not melt

>> from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires,

> there

>> should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally,

> using a

>> reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>>

>> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by

> the "power

>> cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

> depression.

>> The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>>

>> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were

> assembled,

>> but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of

> smaller

>> Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>>

>> Hope this idea helps,

>> Joe Z.

>>

>> ----- Original Message -----

>> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

>> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

>> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>>

>>

>> > r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

>> >

>> > I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette

> plugs

>> > can

>> > back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune

> time. One of

>> > your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew

> strips is

>> > faulty

>> > causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding

> posts

>> > instead.

>> >

>>

>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>







----------------------------

#21354 Mar 18, 2008

Joe Z. said, "I am going to have to think about and experiment with this."



Or, completely get rid of the cigarette plug and all its associated hassles

and using the firm tight built-in Binding Posts instead. :))) ...joe ;)





"May You Go Among The Imperishable Stars"

Joe Mize www.cav-sfo.com

Chiefland Astronomy Village, Fla. ----- Original Message -----

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 9:36 PM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply





> Thanks for the suggestion Joe M.

>

> However, if I clip off one turn of the spring, it will now be a bit

> shorter - so I might stretch it to push the centre pin to his original

> home

> position. I suspect that the spring tension will not be significantly

> changed by a single cut, and there aren't a lot of turns in the coil.

>

> Then again, if we can consider each turn as a separate spring, and the

> turns added in series, the new spring tension will not be the sum of the

> tension of each turn, but the product of tensions (spring constants),

> divided by the sums (as in calculating capacitors in parallel). This means

> that just removing one turn of the spring may not significantly reduce the

> tension of say a 5 or 6 turn spring - as I recall is used in the fused

> plug

> version.

> To make a significant change in the stiff spring you really need to change

> the mass of the wire, while keeping the length the same. Otherwise you

> will

> have a loose centre, without much change in tension.

>

> I am going to have to think about and experiment with this.

>

> Joe Z.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 2:24 PM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>

>

>> JoeZ, if going the rout of modifying the cigarette plug have you looked a

>> reducing the spring tension? When you reduce wire diameter resistance is

>> increased resulting in less current flow. Clipping off a turn of the

>> spring

>> will lower its spring rate reducing the springs tendency of pushing the

>> plug

>> out without increasing resistance. Just another thought...joe ;)

>>

>>

>> "May You Go Among The Imperishable Stars"

>> Joe Mize www.cav-sfo.com

>> Chiefland Astronomy Village, Fla.

>> ----- Original Message -----

>> From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

>> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 2:34 AM

>> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>>

>>

>>> Hi Joe M.

>>>

>>> I will agree with you on your statement that cigarette lighter plugs

>>> tend to want to gradually walk out of their socket.

>>> In fact, I purchased a RoadPro 12v Hair Drier and tried to plug it into

>>> one

>>> of the two auxiliary sockets on their RoadPro battery voltmeters. No way

>>> it

>>> would stay in place - it was totally unusable. In fact, it required a

>>> significant amount of force just to push the centre pin down into the

>>> plug

>>> by hand!

>>>

>>> To answer the challenge I went through a bin of similar corded plugs

>>> at

>>> an electronics store, and each one seemed different, but none were what

>>> I

>>> would call satisfactory. That got me to investigating the cause of the

>>> plugs

>>> not seating firmly, so I took the end cap off the plug on the RoadPro

>>> hair

>>> dryer and quickly discovered the problem with ALL such corded cigarette

>>> lighter plugs - a THICK power cord is solder to the terminals, inside a

>>> very

>>> small compartment. When you try to push the pin inward, the power cord

>>> has

>>> no room to scrunch down - resulting in an inordinate "back pressure" -

>>> so

>>> it

>>> will not stay set, and easily backs out. At that point, even if the plug

>>> looks to be inserted, the tip is barely touching the battery socket

>>> centre

>>> pin - a breeze would disconnect power!

>>>

>>> I quickly realized a very simple quick solution, which I am going to

>>> implement as a retrofit on ALL my cigarette lighter plugs.

>>>

>>> (1) Remove the plug tip, and pull it out of the body along with the

>>> power

>>> cord.

>>> (2) Unsolder the centre pin wire

>>> (3) Cut off about 2 inches (but still above the other, side springs

>>> soldered

>>> wire joint)

>>> (4) Replace the cut off section with a "short bundle" of several much

>>> thinner gage, TEFLON coated, "stranded" wires

>>> (5) Put a heat shrink around the multi soldered joint, to prevent

>>> shorting

>>> the new bundle to the other (negative) terminal

>>> (6) Solder the other end of the bundle of Teflon coated stranded wires

>>> to

>>> the centre pin

>>>

>>> Now, when you insert the plug into a lighter socket, the 2 inch

>>> bundle

>>> of thinner wire will easily push down, and "individually fan out" inside

>>> the

>>> body of the plug, and the bundle will carry as much current as the

>>> original

>>> single "lamp cord" wire section did. The Teflon coating will also not

>>> melt

>>> from possible high currents - although with enough parallel wires, there

>>> should be no more heating than the original thick wire. Finally, using a

>>> reasonably smaller gage stranded wire, adds to it's flexibility.

>>>

>>> This modification should make the plug totally unaffected by the

>>> "power

>>> cable" being jammed inside, and the pin will have a much softer

>>> depression.

>>> The plug will not have any tendency to walk out.

>>>

>>> I wish this is the way that all cigarette lighter cords were

>>> assembled,

>>> but I guess the extra step of soldering a "compressible bundle" of

>>> smaller

>>> Teflon wires, adds a penny to the assembly costs in China.

>>>

>>> Hope this idea helps,

>>> Joe Z.

>>>

>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>> From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

>>> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>>> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 10:51 AM

>>> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>>>

>>>

>>>> r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

>>>>

>>>> I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette plugs

>>>> can

>>>> back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune time. One

>>>> of

>>>> your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips is

>>>> faulty

>>>> causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding posts

>>>> instead.

>>>>

>>>

>>>

---------------

>>>

>>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

>>> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>

>>

>>

---------------

>>

>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

>> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>>

>>

>>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>

>







----------------------------

#21355 Mar 18, 2008

Thanks Gene,



Did a search on "Receptacles" at www.westmarine.com and see what you are

talking about. I would say the 12v socket/plug used for boating is exactly

what we should be using in field astronomy power. We face the same problems

as boaters - vibration kicking out the plug, and possible water penetration.

The 90 degree twist lock seems like a solid solution. Only a small

inconvenience that every power cord device will have to be cut off and

replaced at $12 a shot, and the socket will no longer accept standard 12v

power cord devices in a pinch.



Then again, one could make a short "adapter cord" with the marine plug

on one end, and one (or more) of the standard sockets to accept any standard

cords, when required. Will have to consider this product - sure beats losing

a long night of photography and ruin it because of a $160 12v plug.



Looks good - thanks for the lead.

Joe ----- Original Message -----

From: "Eugene Roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 4:01 PM

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





> Regarding Cigarette Plugs and Receptacles

> Your requirements are way beyond cigarettes, so look at these from

> 'WestMarine.com'

> Performance is superb, I have several and recommend them

> Cost accordingly

> Gene R

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>



----------------------------

#21356 Mar 18, 2008

... and finally, I hope ....



There is one more thing to look at when buying a device that uses a

cigarette lighter plug.

The centre pins, and the screw cap on the tip come in various sizes &

widths.

Some pins have a decent amount of travel on a soft spring, while other plugs

have a somewhat "shorter centre pin". This means that there is more of a

chance that the pin will not make a firm contact in the socket.



The other cause of "disconnect" inside the socket is the "shape of the

end cap" (or screw) on the plug. For example, on my RoadPro "Digital Volt

Meter & Socket Multiplier (#RP-203VM), the red end cap which is screwed onto

the tip, is quite wide and bulky, and to make things worse, the plunger

centre pin is somewhat short. When I plug this device into my Power Tank

receptacle, it doesn't take much of a side ways push, to get a disconnect.

This is due to two reasons: The first is as I described above, that the pin

has very little travel.



However the second problem you might not be aware of, is that a "wide

brim" on that end cap easily touches the bottom of the socket, and levers up

the pin away from the centre contact, if the device is not held absolutely

straight into the socket. Because this voltmeter/dual socket product is

somewhat heavy, it "sags" in the Power Tank socket, then leaning on its

cap's brim, it is levered into a disconnect internally.



Now, when I shop for a good lighter plug, there are certain things I

check for:



(1) Is the plug's end cap a narrow screw cap, of a wide brim, flat cap?

Ideally, a "bullet shaped plug tip" with a very narrow cap, should not

"lever itself" away from internal connection



(2) Is there a LONG centre pin? A short pin, combined with a wide cap, will

lose contact. If there is more than one model of plug, I either measure the

tips with a ruler in same store, or if in the same store, point one model's

tip into the tip of another model, and choose the plug with a longer centre

pin.



(3) How hard is it to push in the centre pin? A strong spring will push the

plug out. The side springs should grip the walls and hold the plug inside

the socket "harder than" the centre spring trying to push itself out. This

plug may require a spring replacement.



(4) Check the "side springs" - if they are thin and flexible, they might not

grip the insides of the socket hard enough, and the plug will undock. I have

seen some plugs in the same store, that had one fixed side contact wing, and

the other side had just one spring contact. The plug should have two side

springs, for proper alignment, and more side force.



(5) Is the plug a long bodied unit, or a "mini-bullet" shape? I find that

the longer the plug is, sticking out of the socket, the more chance there

will be that it will "fall out", get brushed aside, and be knocked out, or

with cord leverage, will drop off.



(6) A plug with an LED indicator on the body is an asset, since you can see

whether it is making good contact.



The AP-900 DC power cord plug is a good example of a reasonably fine

plug:

- soft centre spring, adequate bullet shaped tip,

- short torpedo type body that slips completely inside the socket, with no

overhang

- reasonable length centre power pin

- low mass plug body, so the side spring is able to maintain it inside



In the end, I must say I really like the RoadPro back lit LCD Voltmeter

with it's two lighter sockets. It acts like a Y-cable, so you gain an extra

12v socket when you insert the digital volt meter into your Power Tank

receptacle. It's also nice to know, from the digital readout, how close your

battery is to "calling it a night".

However, this is an excellent example of a product concept that was badly

executed at the manufacturing design stage. It has to be the worst

cigarette lighter plug I have yet come across. It suffers from every flaw in

my list above.

Someday I will take it apart and rebuild it the way it should have been

designed, with a new 12v DC plug for this meter.



Joe







----------------------------

#21359 Mar 19, 2008

-

The exact reference to the West Marine product is





Manufacturer.Style

MARINCO - .009_275_007_002





Description







Unlike many 12V plugs and receptacles on boats, Marinco's are

designed to withstand the rigors of wet environments and constant

motion.

..Large contact surfaces and corrosion resistant materials

ensure solid contact and low voltage drop

..Sealing ring around the shaft of the plug to seat firmly and

keep out spray

..ground contacts engage the receptacle, plug must be turned

90. to remove

Components are compatible with existing plugs and receptacle





Description.WM Model#.MFG Part #.Price.In Stock?

Qty



Plug - 12V Lighter

343568.12VPG. Only $11.99 USD .YES





Plug & Receptacle - 12V Lighter

343584.12VPK. Only $23.99 USD .YES





Receptacle - 12V Lighter

343576.12VRC. Only $17.99 USD .YES



















-- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Thanks Gene,

>

> Did a search on "Receptacles" at www.westmarine.com and see

what you are > talking about. I would say the 12v socket/plug used for boating is

exactly > what we should be using in field astronomy power. We face the same

problems > as boaters - vibration kicking out the plug, and possible water

penetration. > The 90 degree twist lock seems like a solid solution. Only a small

> inconvenience that every power cord device will have to be cut off

and > replaced at $12 a shot, and the socket will no longer accept

standard 12v > power cord devices in a pinch.

>

> Then again, one could make a short "adapter cord" with the

marine plug > on one end, and one (or more) of the standard sockets to accept any

standard > cords, when required. Will have to consider this product - sure

beats losing > a long night of photography and ruin it because of a $160 12v plug.

>

> Looks good - thanks for the lead.

> Joe

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Eugene Roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 4:01 PM

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

> > Regarding Cigarette Plugs and Receptacles

> > Your requirements are way beyond cigarettes, so look at these

from > > 'WestMarine.com'

> > Performance is superb, I have several and recommend them

> > Cost accordingly

> > Gene R

> >

> >

> >

> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

> >

> >

---------------

> >

> > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

> >

> >

> >

>



----------------------------

#21360 Mar 19, 2008

Hi,







There were two customer reviews on these products on the West Marine site. While that may not be a large sample of the people who have purchased these items, the reviews might still be worth a look. Both were very bad.







Mag. 7 skies!







Howard Hedlund



Astro-Physics, Inc.



815-282-1513



---------------



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of eugene roeschlein

Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:46 AM

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply







-

The exact reference to the West Marine product is





Manufacturer Style

MARINCO - 009_275_007_002



Description



Unlike many 12V plugs and receptacles on boats, Marinco's are

designed to withstand the rigors of wet environments and constant

motion.

* Large contact surfaces and corrosion resistant materials

ensure solid contact and low voltage drop

* Sealing ring around the shaft of the plug to seat firmly and

keep out spray

* ground contacts engage the receptacle, plug must be turned

90. to remove

Components are compatible with existing plugs and receptacle



Description WM Model# MFG Part # Price In Stock?

Qty



Plug - 12V Lighter

343568 12VPG Only $11.99 USD YES





Plug & Receptacle - 12V Lighter

343584 12VPK Only $23.99 USD YES





Receptacle - 12V Lighter

343576 12VRC Only $17.99 USD YES





-- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> , "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Thanks Gene,

>

> Did a search on "Receptacles" at www.westmarine.com and see

what you are > talking about. I would say the 12v socket/plug used for boating is

exactly > what we should be using in field astronomy power. We face the same

problems > as boaters - vibration kicking out the plug, and possible water

penetration. > The 90 degree twist lock seems like a solid solution. Only a small

> inconvenience that every power cord device will have to be cut off

and > replaced at $12 a shot, and the socket will no longer accept

standard 12v > power cord devices in a pinch.

>

> Then again, one could make a short "adapter cord" with the

marine plug > on one end, and one (or more) of the standard sockets to accept any

standard > cords, when required. Will have to consider this product - sure

beats losing > a long night of photography and ruin it because of a $160 12v plug.

>

> Looks good - thanks for the lead.

> Joe

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Eugene Roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> >

> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 4:01 PM

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

> > Regarding Cigarette Plugs and Receptacles

> > Your requirements are way beyond cigarettes, so look at these

from > > 'WestMarine.com'

> > Performance is superb, I have several and recommend them

> > Cost accordingly

> > Gene R

> >

> >

> >

> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

> >

> >

---------------

> >

> > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo> ! Groups Links

> >

> >

> >

>











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#21362 Mar 19, 2008

I don't know how seriously to take the bad reviews. Unlike A-P customers, maybe these reviewers did something bone-headed! ;-) Keep in mind that Gene (a group member and therefore a fine fellow) gave a very positive review in his initial post, and I would give his comments more weight than the comments of others. I found the reviews because Rolando asked me to look into the issue. We are always interested in possible ways to improve our products, but not every potential improvement pans out as genuine or practical. The cig lighter plugs that we use are already very high quality compared to most that you see, and they have a relatively short profile that makes them less likely to get knocked out. That being said, we certainly took a good look, and I gave Roland the spec sheets from the Marinco site to look at.







Mag. 7 skies!







Howard Hedlund



Astro-Physics, Inc.



815-282-1513



---------------



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Murray Hammick

Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 11:03 AM

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply







Interesting, Howard: thanks for the warning. What did you think of the points in the reviews ?



Is this an area anyone at AP has looked into with a view to upgrading the AP -supplied connectors ?



murray



Howard howard@... mailto:howard%40astro-physics.com> > wrote:

Hi,



There were two customer reviews on these products on the West Marine site. While that may not be a large sample of the people who have purchased these items, the reviews might still be worth a look. Both were very bad.



Mag. 7 skies!



Howard Hedlund



Astro-Physics, Inc.



815-282-1513



---------------



From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of eugene roeschlein

Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:46 AM

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply



-

The exact reference to the West Marine product is



Manufacturer Style

MARINCO - 009_275_007_002



Description



Unlike many 12V plugs and receptacles on boats, Marinco's are

designed to withstand the rigors of wet environments and constant

motion.

* Large contact surfaces and corrosion resistant materials

ensure solid contact and low voltage drop

* Sealing ring around the shaft of the plug to seat firmly and

keep out spray

* ground contacts engage the receptacle, plug must be turned

90. to remove

Components are compatible with existing plugs and receptacle



Description WM Model# MFG Part # Price In Stock?

Qty



Plug - 12V Lighter

343568 12VPG Only $11.99 USD YES



Plug & Receptacle - 12V Lighter

343584 12VPK Only $23.99 USD YES



Receptacle - 12V Lighter

343576 12VRC Only $17.99 USD YES



-- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> , "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Thanks Gene,

>

> Did a search on "Receptacles" at www.westmarine.com and see

what you are > talking about. I would say the 12v socket/plug used for boating is

exactly > what we should be using in field astronomy power. We face the same

problems > as boaters - vibration kicking out the plug, and possible water

penetration. > The 90 degree twist lock seems like a solid solution. Only a small

> inconvenience that every power cord device will have to be cut off

and > replaced at $12 a shot, and the socket will no longer accept

standard 12v > power cord devices in a pinch.

>

> Then again, one could make a short "adapter cord" with the

marine plug > on one end, and one (or more) of the standard sockets to accept any

standard > cords, when required. Will have to consider this product - sure

beats losing > a long night of photography and ruin it because of a $160 12v plug.

>

> Looks good - thanks for the lead.

> Joe

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Eugene Roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> >

> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 4:01 PM

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

> > Regarding Cigarette Plugs and Receptacles

> > Your requirements are way beyond cigarettes, so look at these

from > > 'WestMarine.com'

> > Performance is superb, I have several and recommend them

> > Cost accordingly

> > Gene R

> >

> >

> >

> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

> >

> >

---------------

> >

> > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo> groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo> > ! Groups Links

> >

> >

> >

>



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







----------------------------

#21364 Mar 19, 2008

Hi Howard,



I've been using West Marine Marinco plugs for years with my astro

equipment and have never had a problem. As with any plug, as long as

you are careful about polarity, they work fine. I particularly like

them because they do have the "locking" feature that minimizes the

plug pulling out of the receptacle.



Best Regards,



Dave

--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Howard" howard@...> wrote:

>

> I don't know how seriously to take the bad reviews. Unlike A-P

customers, maybe these reviewers did something bone-headed! ;-)

Keep in mind that Gene (a group member and therefore a fine fellow)

gave a very positive review in his initial post, and I would give his

comments more weight than the comments of others. I found the

reviews because Rolando asked me to look into the issue. We are

always interested in possible ways to improve our products, but not

every potential improvement pans out as genuine or practical. The

cig lighter plugs that we use are already very high quality compared

to most that you see, and they have a relatively short profile that

makes them less likely to get knocked out. That being said, we

certainly took a good look, and I gave Roland the spec sheets from

the Marinco site to look at.

>

>

>

> Mag. 7 skies!

>

>

>

> Howard Hedlund

>

> Astro-Physics, Inc.

>

> 815-282-1513

>

---------------

>

> From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com] On

Behalf Of Murray Hammick

> Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 11:03 AM

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com

> Subject: RE: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

>

> Interesting, Howard: thanks for the warning. What did you think of

the points in the reviews ?

>

> Is this an area anyone at AP has looked into with a view to

upgrading the AP -supplied connectors ?

>

> murray

>

> Howard howard@... mailto:howard%40astro-physics.com> > wrote:

> Hi,

>

> There were two customer reviews on these products on the West

Marine site. While that may not be a large sample of the people who

have purchased these items, the reviews might still be worth a look.

Both were very bad.

>

> Mag. 7 skies!

>

> Howard Hedlund

>

> Astro-Physics, Inc.

>

> 815-282-1513

>

---------------

>

> From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>

[mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> ] On

Behalf Of eugene roeschlein

> Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:46 AM

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

> -

> The exact reference to the West Marine product is

>

> Manufacturer Style

> MARINCO - 009_275_007_002

>

> Description

>

> Unlike many 12V plugs and receptacles on boats, Marinco's are

> designed to withstand the rigors of wet environments and constant

> motion.

> * Large contact surfaces and corrosion resistant materials

> ensure solid contact and low voltage drop

> * Sealing ring around the shaft of the plug to seat firmly and

> keep out spray

> * ground contacts engage the receptacle, plug must be turned

> 90. to remove

> Components are compatible with existing plugs and receptacle

>

> Description WM Model# MFG Part # Price In Stock?

> Qty

>

> Plug - 12V Lighter

> 343568 12VPG Only $11.99 USD YES

>

> Plug & Receptacle - 12V Lighter

> 343584 12VPK Only $23.99 USD YES

>

> Receptacle - 12V Lighter

> 343576 12VRC Only $17.99 USD YES

>

> -- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>

mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> , "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@>

> wrote:

> >

> > Thanks Gene,

> >

> > Did a search on "Receptacles" at www.westmarine.com and see

> what you are

> > talking about. I would say the 12v socket/plug used for boating

is

> exactly

> > what we should be using in field astronomy power. We face the

same

> problems

> > as boaters - vibration kicking out the plug, and possible water

> penetration.

> > The 90 degree twist lock seems like a solid solution. Only a

small

> > inconvenience that every power cord device will have to be cut

off

> and

> > replaced at $12 a shot, and the socket will no longer accept

> standard 12v

> > power cord devices in a pinch.

> >

> > Then again, one could make a short "adapter cord" with the

> marine plug

> > on one end, and one (or more) of the standard sockets to accept

any

> standard

> > cords, when required. Will have to consider this product - sure

> beats losing

> > a long night of photography and ruin it because of a $160 12v

plug.

> >

> > Looks good - thanks for the lead.

> > Joe

> > ----- Original Message -----

> > From: "Eugene Roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@>

> > To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com>

mailto:ap-gto%40yahoogroups.com> >

> > Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 4:01 PM

> > Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

> >

> >

> > > Regarding Cigarette Plugs and Receptacles

> > > Your requirements are way beyond cigarettes, so look at these

> from

> > > 'WestMarine.com'

> > > Performance is superb, I have several and recommend them

> > > Cost accordingly

> > > Gene R

> > >

> > >

> > >

> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

> > >

> > >

---------------

> > >

> > > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> > > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo

groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo>

groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo

groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo> > ! Groups Links

> > >

> > >

> > >

> >

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>

>

>

>

>

> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

>







----------------------------

#21365 Mar 19, 2008

Hi Gene,



One further question on the Marine connectors you use - are they

interchangeable with using existing "standard cig lighter" products?



If I should buy some new device with a car cig lighter on it - or

someone at a scope meet need to power something of his that has a standard

plug - will it plug into the Marine lighter socket, or do I have to modify

the new item replacing its plug with a matching Marine plug?

In other words, does the Marine lock-in socket preclude using existing cig

lighter based products?



And vice versa - if I modify my devices to a Marine plug, will the

Marine plug still fit into say a Celestron Power Tank on a field trip?



Because the Marine cig lighter sets are threaded to lock together, I am

concerned about maintaining "existing compatibility". No use making a Marine

connector based power system for back yard use, and not be able to use it

with a standard purchased power pack away from home.



Thanks,

Joe

----- Original Message -----

From: "eugene roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:45 AM

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





-

The exact reference to the West Marine product is





Manufacturer Style

MARINCO - 009_275_007_002



----------------------------

#21367 Mar 19, 2008

Hi Joe,

I use two of this model and it says regulated right in the front of the

product.

www.audiooutfitter.com/ps15kx/pyramid/p316751.html

Chuck/divenuts ----- Original Message -----

From: "JoeMize" jmize@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 4:29 PM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





>I wouldn't use Variable Voltage/Amperage Power Supply myself. I've never

> seen one which state they're a "Regulated" power supply...joe :)

>

>

> "May You Go Among The Imperishable Stars"

> Joe Mize www.cav-sfo.com

> Chiefland Astronomy Village, Fla.

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Rick Wiggins" rickwiggins@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Tuesday, March 18, 2008 3:54 PM

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

>> Hi Joe,

>> Another thought is to just get one Pyramid. They make models from 5

>> amp to at least 40 amps and maybe even higher. If you are going to

>> tie the grounds together, then might as well use one supply. It is

>> much cheaper as well...plus the larger units have settable voltage

>> that will allow you to use a sense line to precisely set voltage at

>> whatever you want at the device of interest.

>> Thanks, Rick

>>

>> --- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "JoeMize" jmize@...> wrote:

>>>

>>> r1300s, a 'different' Joe here.

>>>

>>> I never use cigarette plugs. I learned a long time ago Cigarette

>> plugs can

>>> back out by themselves for no reason at the most inopportune

>> time. One of

>>> your three may have partially backed out, or one of the Dew strips

>> is faulty

>>> causing over heating. I use banana plugs on the Pyramid binding

>> posts

>>> instead.

>>>

>>> Radio Shack has Mini-Solderless Banana plugs which work very well

>> without

>>> soldering, convenient for future changes too. I'd bet even a

>> single

>>> cigarette plug has a higher resistance than using banana plugs.

>>>

>>> Dew Heaters are very power hungry devices. I run my dew heaters

>> at 5deg

>>> above ambient and the power supply is always warmer that the other

>> two power

>>> supplies. Yup I use three dedicated power supplies, one for each

>> 12V piece

>>> of equipment, AP1200, Dew Heater, Focuser. I already had three

>> 5Amp/7Surge

>>> Pyramids so figured why not power each 12V piece of equipment

>> separately.

>>> Over-kill, yes but this setup has worked very well for >5yrs

>> without

>>> problems.

>>>

>>> A piece of trivia, but valuable for all who use multiple 12V power

>> sources:

>>> If you are using multiple power supplies, even a Battery in

>> addition to

>>> power supplies, run a single 12-14ga wire between all the Ground

>> posts.

>>> Take the time to add crimp-on rings to this wire instead of simply

>> wrapping

>>> exposed wire ends. Connecting all grounds posts will eliminate

>> Ground Loop

>>> potentials between power sources.

>>>

>>> HTH...joe :)

>>>

>>>

>>> "May You Go Among The Imperishable Stars"

>>> Joe Mize www.cav-sfo.com

>>> Chiefland Astronomy Village, Fla.

>>> ----- Original Message -----

>>> From: "r1300rs" cardiofuse@...>

>>> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>>> Sent: Monday, March 17, 2008 9:14 AM

>>> Subject: [ap-gto] AC/DC power supply

>>>

>>>

>>> >I currently use a Pyramid 5 amp, 12-15 volt power supply that has

>> one

>>> >cigarette adapter inlet

>>> > along with one set of power posts that plugs into my AC source.

>> Last

>>> > night, with my dew

>>> > heaters cooking along the power supply overheated and shut

>> everything down

>>> > via the built in

>>> > protection circuit.

>>> >

>>> > I would think that 5 amps (7 amp surge) would be plenty to run 4

>> dew

>>> > heaters (main scope,

>>> > finder, guidescope, telrad).

>>> >

>>> > I was wondering what every else used for a DC source. I did

>> have a

>>> > cigarette "y" splitter with

>>> > one leg to the scope and the other to the dew controller. Maybe

>> it was

>>> > bad or had a high

>>> > resistance.

>>> >

>>> > Thanks; maybe I need to upgrade.

>>> >

>>> >

---------------

>>> >

>>> > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

>>> > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>>> >

>>> >

>>> >

>>> >

>>>

>>

>>

>>

---------------

>>

>> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

>> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>>

>>

>>

>>

>

>

>

---------------

>

> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

>

>

>







----------------------------

#21369 Mar 20, 2008

The best way to check out the interchangeability thing is to just go

get a pair and try them out on your various applications.

I shudder every time I hear the word interchangeable !!

Never know for sure until I have first hand tryout.

This is true for both hardware and software these days.

If they work use them,,,if not give them to your brother-in-law or

some else.

Hoping for the best.

Gene R







--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Hi Gene,

>

> One further question on the Marine connectors you use - are

they > interchangeable with using existing "standard cig lighter" products?

>

> If I should buy some new device with a car cig lighter on it -

or > someone at a scope meet need to power something of his that has a

standard > plug - will it plug into the Marine lighter socket, or do I have

to modify > the new item replacing its plug with a matching Marine plug?

> In other words, does the Marine lock-in socket preclude using

existing cig > lighter based products?

>

> And vice versa - if I modify my devices to a Marine plug, will

the > Marine plug still fit into say a Celestron Power Tank on a field

trip? >

> Because the Marine cig lighter sets are threaded to lock

together, I am > concerned about maintaining "existing compatibility". No use making

a Marine > connector based power system for back yard use, and not be able to

use it > with a standard purchased power pack away from home.

>

> Thanks,

> Joe

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "eugene roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:45 AM

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

> -

> The exact reference to the West Marine product is

>

>

> Manufacturer Style

> MARINCO - 009_275_007_002

>



----------------------------

#21370 Mar 20, 2008

The best way to check out the interchangeability thing is to just go

get a pair and try them out on your various applications.

I shudder every time I hear the word interchangeable !!

Never know for sure until I have first hand tryout.

This is true for both hardware and software these days.

If they work use them,,,if not give them to your brother-in-law or

some else.

Hoping for the best.

Gene R







--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Hi Gene,

>

> One further question on the Marine connectors you use - are

they > interchangeable with using existing "standard cig lighter" products?

>

> If I should buy some new device with a car cig lighter on it -

or > someone at a scope meet need to power something of his that has a

standard > plug - will it plug into the Marine lighter socket, or do I have

to modify > the new item replacing its plug with a matching Marine plug?

> In other words, does the Marine lock-in socket preclude using

existing cig > lighter based products?

>

> And vice versa - if I modify my devices to a Marine plug, will

the > Marine plug still fit into say a Celestron Power Tank on a field

trip? >

> Because the Marine cig lighter sets are threaded to lock

together, I am > concerned about maintaining "existing compatibility". No use making

a Marine > connector based power system for back yard use, and not be able to

use it > with a standard purchased power pack away from home.

>

> Thanks,

> Joe

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "eugene roeschlein" eugeneroeschlein@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:45 AM

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

> -

> The exact reference to the West Marine product is

>

>

> Manufacturer Style

> MARINCO - 009_275_007_002

>



----------------------------

#21376 Mar 20, 2008

Hi Chuck,



Actually, I was once concerned about THIS PS-15KX being regulated,

because all of their other supplies on the Pyramid web page, use the term

Regulated in each headline, except this model. However, if you click on the

"Item Manual" in each spec sheet, you can get the details on the regulation,

specs - everything except weight :-)



I like their 25 amp model with the adjustable voltage with volt &

ammeter, but when I tried to lift it off the store shelf, my back told me

that unit carries too large a load for me to haul to the backyard - its

mostly transformer iron.



Joe Z.



----- Original Message -----

From: "divenuts" divenuts@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2008 4:21 PM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





>I use two of the same units as I mentioned yesterday when someone doubted

> they were regulated power supplies.. I use one for dew heaters and the

> other

> for the scope/mount. Great minds think alikeG> I have had mine for ~3

> years

> and paid arounf $39 at the time.

> Chuck/divenuts

>

> "Hi Joe,

> I use two of this model and it says regulated right in the front of the

> product.

> www.audiooutfitter.com/ps15kx/pyramid/p316751.html

> Chuck/divenuts"







----------------------------

#21377 Mar 20, 2008

Hi Joe,

I had my doubts, so I just put a Sears testers on it and it puts 13.8v out

..pretty much all the times I tested it. I periodically test it under

different draws and find it pretty reliable. I used to use just a 12v DC

powerpack on the scope/mount for the smooth power, but now trust the ac/dc

power supplies.

Chuck/divenuts ----- Original Message -----

From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Friday, March 21, 2008 12:08 AM

Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





> Hi Chuck,

>

> Actually, I was once concerned about THIS PS-15KX being regulated,

> because all of their other supplies on the Pyramid web page, use the term

> Regulated in each headline, except this model. However, if you click on

> the

> "Item Manual" in each spec sheet, you can get the details on the

> regulation,

> specs - everything except weight :-)

>

> I like their 25 amp model with the adjustable voltage with volt &

> ammeter, but when I tried to lift it off the store shelf, my back told me

> that unit carries too large a load for me to haul to the backyard - its

> mostly transformer iron.

>

> Joe Z.

>

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "divenuts" divenuts@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2008 4:21 PM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

>>I use two of the same units as I mentioned yesterday when someone doubted

>> they were regulated power supplies.. I use one for dew heaters and the

>> other

>> for the scope/mount. Great minds think alikeG> I have had mine for ~3

>> years

>> and paid arounf $39 at the time.

>> Chuck/divenuts

>>

>> "Hi Joe,

>> I use two of this model and it says regulated right in the front of the

>> product.

>> www.audiooutfitter.com/ps15kx/pyramid/p316751.html

>> Chuck/divenuts"

>

>

>

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>

>



----------------------------

#21378 Mar 20, 2008

Hi Hunter,



Actually, the AC/DC supply is more trust worthy. A DC battery power pack

will fade from full charge to about 12 volts in very little time, whereas,

the Pyramid will always stay at 13.8 volts. This is good for the AP mount

since it runs much happier at higher voltages upto 17 vdc. Running at 14 vdc

from the Pyramid provides a bit more torque than barely hanging in there

when a DC battery is at just 12 vdc.



Joe Z.

----- Original Message -----

From: "divenuts" divenuts@...>

To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Friday, March 21, 2008 12:25 AM

Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply





> Hi Joe,

> I had my doubts, so I just put a Sears testers on it and it puts 13.8v out

> ..pretty much all the times I tested it. I periodically test it under

> different draws and find it pretty reliable. I used to use just a 12v DC

> powerpack on the scope/mount for the smooth power, but now trust the ac/dc

> power supplies.

> Chuck/divenuts

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Friday, March 21, 2008 12:08 AM

> Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

>> Hi Chuck,

>>

>> Actually, I was once concerned about THIS PS-15KX being regulated,

>> because all of their other supplies on the Pyramid web page, use the term

>> Regulated in each headline, except this model. However, if you click on

>> the

>> "Item Manual" in each spec sheet, you can get the details on the

>> regulation,

>> specs - everything except weight :-)

>>

>> I like their 25 amp model with the adjustable voltage with volt &

>> ammeter, but when I tried to lift it off the store shelf, my back told me

>> that unit carries too large a load for me to haul to the backyard - its

>> mostly transformer iron.

>>

>> Joe Z.

>>

>>

>> ----- Original Message -----

>> From: "divenuts" divenuts@...>

>> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

>> Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2008 4:21 PM

>> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>>

>>

>>>I use two of the same units as I mentioned yesterday when someone doubted

>>> they were regulated power supplies.. I use one for dew heaters and the

>>> other

>>> for the scope/mount. Great minds think alikeG> I have had mine for ~3

>>> years

>>> and paid arounf $39 at the time.

>>> Chuck/divenuts

>>>

>>> "Hi Joe,

>>> I use two of this model and it says regulated right in the front of the

>>> product.

>>> www.audiooutfitter.com/ps15kx/pyramid/p316751.html

>>> Chuck/divenuts"

>>

>>

>>

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> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

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----------------------------

#21380 Mar 21, 2008

FWIW, if you are patient, and can live with "used", Acopian power

supplies can be found at Ham shops (etc) for around the same price

as the Pyramids. They do make regulated and unregulated, so check

the model number on their web page to assure it meets your needs.



Here'a representative sample from just browing a minute on "I Buy"



cgi.ebay.com/Acopian-Linear-Reg-Power-Supply-15VDC-4-2A-

B15G420_W0QQitemZ300207386329QQihZ020QQcategoryZ58286QQssPageNameZWDV

WQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem



I have an 11.5 Amp model in the observatory powering both the AP1200

and 600.



--- In ap-gto@yahoogroups.com, "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

wrote: >

> Hi Hunter,

>

> Actually, the AC/DC supply is more trust worthy. A DC battery

power pack > will fade from full charge to about 12 volts in very little time,

whereas, > the Pyramid will always stay at 13.8 volts. This is good for the

AP mount > since it runs much happier at higher voltages upto 17 vdc. Running

at 14 vdc > from the Pyramid provides a bit more torque than barely hanging in

there > when a DC battery is at just 12 vdc.

>

> Joe Z.

>

> ----- Original Message -----

> From: "divenuts" divenuts@...>

> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> Sent: Friday, March 21, 2008 12:25 AM

> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

>

>

> > Hi Joe,

> > I had my doubts, so I just put a Sears testers on it and it puts

13.8v out > > ..pretty much all the times I tested it. I periodically test it

under > > different draws and find it pretty reliable. I used to use just

a 12v DC > > powerpack on the scope/mount for the smooth power, but now trust

the ac/dc > > power supplies.

> > Chuck/divenuts

> > ----- Original Message -----

> > From: "Joseph Zeglinski" J.Zeglinski@...>

> > To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> > Sent: Friday, March 21, 2008 12:08 AM

> > Subject: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

> >

> >

> >> Hi Chuck,

> >>

> >> Actually, I was once concerned about THIS PS-15KX being

regulated, > >> because all of their other supplies on the Pyramid web page,

use the term > >> Regulated in each headline, except this model. However, if you

click on > >> the

> >> "Item Manual" in each spec sheet, you can get the details on the

> >> regulation,

> >> specs - everything except weight :-)

> >>

> >> I like their 25 amp model with the adjustable voltage with

volt & > >> ammeter, but when I tried to lift it off the store shelf, my

back told me > >> that unit carries too large a load for me to haul to the

backyard - its > >> mostly transformer iron.

> >>

> >> Joe Z.

> >>

> >>

> >> ----- Original Message -----

> >> From: "divenuts" divenuts@...>

> >> To: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com>

> >> Sent: Thursday, March 20, 2008 4:21 PM

> >> Subject: Re: [ap-gto] Re: AC/DC power supply

> >>

> >>

> >>>I use two of the same units as I mentioned yesterday when

someone doubted > >>> they were regulated power supplies.. I use one for dew heaters

and the > >>> other

> >>> for the scope/mount. Great minds think alikeG> I have had

mine for ~3 > >>> years

> >>> and paid arounf $39 at the time.

> >>> Chuck/divenuts

> >>>

> >>> "Hi Joe,

> >>> I use two of this model and it says regulated right in the

front of the > >>> product.

> >>> www.audiooutfitter.com/ps15kx/pyramid/p316751.html

> >>> Chuck/divenuts"

> >>

> >>

> >>

> >>

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=== > >> Groups related to ap-gto

> >>

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> >> groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-ug?

v=1&t=ipt&ch=email&pub=groups&slk=aftr0&sec=recg > >> Astronomy/Amateur: Greetings! This is a discussion group for

both own... > >>

> >> SBIG (641 common members)

> >> groups.yahoo.com/group/SBIG?

v=1&t=ipt&ch=email&pub=groups&slk=aftr1&sec=recg > >> Science/Astronomy: New Page 1 A word that is often used to

describe t... > >>

> >> UncensoredTakGroup (425 common members)

> >> groups.yahoo.com/group/UncensoredTakGroup?

v=1&t=ipt&ch=email&pub=groups&slk=aftr2&sec=recg > >> Science/Astronomy: Open and honest talk about Takahashi

Equipment. Su... > >>

> >> ccd-newastro (411 common members)

> >> groups.yahoo.com/group/ccd-newastro?

v=1&t=ipt&ch=email&pub=groups&slk=aftr3&sec=recg > >> Astronomy/Astrophotography: The CCD camera has revolutionized

the art of > >> astro...

> >>

> >> MaxImDL (408 common members)

> >> groups.yahoo.com/group/MaxImDL?

v=1&t=ipt&ch=email&pub=groups&slk=aftr4&sec=recg > >> Astronomy/Amateur: A group for users of MaxIm DL software to

discuss ... > >>

> >>

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> >>

> >> To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> >> see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

> >>

> >>

> >>

> >

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> >

> > To UNSUBSCRIBE, or for general information on the ap-gto list

> > see groups.yahoo.com/group/ap-gtoYahoo! Groups Links

> >

> >

> >

> >

>







----------------------------

#59102 Oct 19, 2017

Recently somebody (I think it was Roland) suggested that what we want is

a good quality regulated SWITCHING power supply.



Why a SWITCHING PS instead of an old-fashioned transformer PS? I

thought that even though transformers are much much heavier and larger,

they were in general cleaner.



The 12v PS I used to use with my Mach1 and camera was made by Pyramid --

with a very heavy transformer inside. A couple of years ago I put that

one in my mobile observatory -- where it is now. And I bought a second

one just like it for portable use with my Mach1 and camera.



But that "new" PS has a serious problem (I mentioned in another post

this evening). So I bought a new switching PS. I like the new one

because it's so much smaller and lighter and has built-in PP

connections. But it has a "noise adjuster" knob to hopefully minimize

noise for HAM radio use. The fact that it even has such an adjustment

tells me there's a problem with noise in at least this switching PS.



Any comments?



Woody



----------------------------

#59104 Oct 19, 2017

Woody, 

I don't know about the "noise adjuster" knob on a communications grade switching power supply.  I haven't ever seen one in any of the power supplies I have used but I have used Astron brand switching power supplies and Astron linear power supplies for decades with my ham radio gear and my astro gear without any problem.  I use the switching power supplies for the portable astronomy gear that I take out to the club's site because they are easier to lift in and out of the truck.  My 20 amp switching power supply is quite a bit lighter than my linear power supply.  

There is an outfit here in San Diego called Ham Radio Outlet.  They could set you up with a nice linear or switching power supply... whichever you prefer.

Dean Jacobsen



----------------------------

#59106 Oct 20, 2017

Modern switching power supplies use a frequency of about 20Khz to 2Mhz

instead of the old-school 60hz to change voltages from one level to another.

The higher the frequency, the smaller the transformer and filter components

can be. This saves in weight and cost and can increase conversion

efficiency, resulting in less heat generation (energy loss).



The down side is that the switcher frequency range is in the medium-wave &

shortwave radio spectrum bands and can cause primary and harmonic

interference for ham gear at certain frequencies placed close to the

switcher. Having a switcher with an adjustable frequency is sort of a cool

feature that would really appeal to ham radio enthusiasts and shortwave

listeners.





-Christopher Erickson

Observatory engineer

Summit Kinetics

Waikoloa, HI 96738

www.summitkinetics.com





-----Original Message-----

From: ap-gto@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ap-gto@yahoogroups.com]

Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2017 5:34 PM

To: A-P GOTO Mounts Yahoo Group

Subject: [ap-gto] 12v DC power supply question



Recently somebody (I think it was Roland) suggested that what we want is a

good quality regulated SWITCHING power supply.



Why a SWITCHING PS instead of an old-fashioned transformer PS? I thought

that even though transformers are much much heavier and larger, they were in

general cleaner.



The 12v PS I used to use with my Mach1 and camera was made by Pyramid --

with a very heavy transformer inside. A couple of years ago I put that one

in my mobile observatory -- where it is now. And I bought a second one just

like it for portable use with my Mach1 and camera.



But that "new" PS has a serious problem (I mentioned in another post this

evening). So I bought a new switching PS. I like the new one because it's

so much smaller and lighter and has built-in PP connections. But it has a

"noise adjuster" knob to hopefully minimize noise for HAM radio use. The

fact that it even has such an adjustment tells me there's a problem with

noise in at least this switching PS.



Any comments?



Woody







---------------

Posted by: "Woody Schlom" woody_is@...>

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